E-petition on Airline Allergy Policy

This being allergy awareness month, By George features an electronic motion now in Canada’s Parliament on the serious condition of anaphylaxis and safer airline allergy policies.

 

e-106 (Anaphylaxis) is sponsored by Dr. Hedy Fry, M.P. for Vancouver Centre and it is on-line on the Parliamentary website:

 

https://petitions.parl.gc.ca/en/Petition/Details?Petition=e-106

 

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This Petition to the Government of Canada reads:

 

Whereas:

On Wednesday, May 22, 2013, Members of Parliament voted unanimously in support of Anaphylaxis Motion M-230 proposed by M.P. Dean Allison “That in the opinion of the House, anaphylaxis is a serious concern for an increasing number of Canadians and the government should take the appropriate measures necessary to ensure these Canadians are able to maintain a high quality of life.”;

 

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening medical condition now affecting 2.5 million Canadians for which there is no treatment or cure;

 

Those with anaphylaxis are especially vulnerable while traveling on airlines at 35,000 feet in the air – far from emergency medical care; and

 

Improved Transportation Safeguards – relating to airline and public transportation policies that reduce risks for food allergic passengers is a primary goal of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative’s 5-Point Action Policy as it relates to Anaphylaxis Motion M-230.

 

We, the undersigned, members of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative and citizens of Canada, draw the attention of the House of Commons to the above and , call upon the Government of Canada to enact a “Policy to Reduce the Risk for Anaphylactic Passengers” applicable to all forms of passenger transportation falling within its jurisdiction.

 

For clarification, the stated policy is a two-step approach to air safety for those with anaphylaxis or severe allergies. It puts a procedure in place that, when a passenger identifies him/herself as having a severe peanut or nut allergy, an airline would be required to:

  • suspend the selling of peanuts/nuts/sesame snaps
  • make an announcement about refraining from eating these products
  • allow persons to carry epi-pens
  • allow pre-boarding so that persons can wipe down seats
  • require flight crew to be trained to administer an epi-pen in emergency situation
  • add “allergy notification” to passenger information list

 

Please take 2 minutes and click onto the on-line form and sign this e-petition.

e-106 (Anaphylaxis)

 

The e-petition is open for 120 days and closes for signature : July 20, 2016, at 8:44 a.m. (EDT). All persons 14 years of age and older can sign.

 

For more By George Journal articles on anaphylaxis, click into our archives.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Anaphylaxis Motion M-230 (one year later)

It was a year ago today that MPs in our federal Parliament passed a motion to raise greater awareness for anaphylaxis, a potentially, deadly medical condition for those with severe allergies. Below are my reflections of my family’s experience being on Parliament Hill to see this important vote.  

 

anaDSCN1880revI wish to wrap up the events of last week with a few personal observations.

  • It was very gratifying last Wednesday night to see the anaphylaxis awareness motion receive MPs’ unanimous consent in the House of Commons. Our group of families, who have been volunteering our efforts over the past five years, connected with many MPs over three different Parliaments. It was wonderful for us to see our work with MPs, to raise awareness and understanding of severe allergies, result in an overwhelming endorsement.
  • To our group of families that comprised the core of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative, thank you so much! What began as a bunch of questions posed in Cindy’s basement, has involved hundreds of hours of phone conversations and e-mails, meetings, envelope stuffing – and trips to Beamsville and a few to Ottawa – all special memories that have forged very special friendships. CAI was truly a group effort – and I know I can say that we were inspired and motivated by our respective love for our families. (Photo of some CAI family members on the steps of Parliament Hill) 
  • Another huge thank you goes out to MP Dean Allison (pictured below with David George), who moved M-230 and managed its progress to the vote last week. Dean introduced the motion in two successive Parliaments, picking up from MP Rick Dykstra’s original motion back in the mid 2000’s. We appreciate the time and effort Dean and Rick have given this important subject over the years. We hope your work with fellow MPs will spur government action on further allergy policy developments.
  • CAI’s voice on some important policy issues has been heard and, it demonstrates that a coordinated effort by a group of citizens can produce results. In our case, we got a motion through the House of Commons, signalling to all Parliamentarians the heightened importance Canadians place on finding better ways to deal with anaphylaxis. CAI was also part of the government’s labeling announcement; we were consulted concerning funding for research; and we have become a source of information for circles of MPs who are attempting to advance anaphylaxis concerns in Ottawa.
  • Finally, on a personal note, it was great that my sons could be witness to the M-230 vote. I was pleased David got to see the MPs resolve concerning severe allergies. He has followed the debate in the House and has followed the actions of Dean and Rick through these past few years. Our Family hopes that this motion is but a first step in a fulsome government response to creating the proper public understanding and a safer environment for Canadians with anaphylaxis.

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(ed. – This article is a report from the original Journal entry in May 2013.)

Re: Anaphylaxis and the unanimous Motion 230 vote

anaDSCN1880revI wish to wrap up the events of last week with a few personal observations.

  • It was very gratifying last Wednesday night to see the anaphylaxis awareness motion receive MPs’ unanimous consent in the House of Commons. Our group of families, who have been volunteering our efforts over the past five years, connected with many MPs over three different Parliaments. It was wonderful for us to see our work with MPs, to raise awareness and understanding of severe allergies, result in an overwhelming endorsement.
  • To our group of families that comprised the core of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative, thank you so much! What began as a bunch of questions posed in Cindy’s basement, has involved hundreds of hours of phone conversations and e-mails, meetings, envelope stuffing – and trips to Beamsville and a few to Ottawa – all special memories that have forged very special friendships. CAI was truly a group effort – and I know I can say that we were inspired and motivated by our respective love for our families. (Photo of some CAI family members on the steps of Parliament Hill) 
  • Another huge thank you goes out to MP Dean Allison (pictured below with David George), who moved M-230 and managed its progress to the vote last week. Dean introduced the motion in two successive Parliaments, picking up from MP Rick Dykstra’s original motion back in the mid 2000’s. We appreciate the time and effort Dean and Rick have given this important subject over the years. We hope your work with fellow MPs will spur government action on further allergy policy developments.
  • CAI’s voice on some important policy issues has been heard and, it demonstrates that a coordinated effort by a group of citizens can produce results. In our case, we got a motion through the House of Commons, signalling to all Parliamentarians the heightened importance Canadians place on finding better ways to deal with anaphylaxis. CAI was also part of the government’s labeling announcement; we were consulted concerning funding for research; and we have become a source of information for circles of MPs who are attempting to advance anaphylaxis concerns in Ottawa.
  • Finally, on a personal note, it was great that my sons could be witness to the M-230 vote. I was pleased David got to see the MPs resolve concerning severe allergies. He has followed the debate in the House and has followed the actions of Dean and Rick through these past few years. Our Family hopes that this motion is but a first step in a fulsome government response to creating the proper public understanding and a safer environment for Canadians with anaphylaxis.   

IMG_1321

 

Members of Parliament pass Anaphylaxis Awareness Motion

CAIMPs’ votes in the House of Commons last night included the passing of Motion 230, a motion to raise awareness of anaphylaxis, a life-threatening medical condition brought on by severe allergies. This is welcomed news for family members of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI), a volunteer network of concerned families who have been working with MPs to raise awareness of severe allergies in Ottawa.

 

The anaphylaxis motion passed with unanimous, all-Party support. Niagara West-Glanbrook MP Dean Allison initiated the debate in the House of Commons, moving: That in the opinion of the House, anaphylaxis is a serious concern for an increasing number of Canadians and the government should take the appropriate measures necessary to ensure these Canadians are able to maintain a high quality of life.

 

“By bringing more attention and awareness to the Canadian public, our debate in Parliament has helped Canadians understand the signs, dangers and consequences of an anaphylactic reaction,” said MP Dean Allison. “With the passing of this motion, Canadians living with anaphylaxis receive much needed recognition from our government. We stand with them in their efforts to promote awareness of the condition.”

 

For the full press release by the CAI, click HERE.

Raising Awareness for Anaphylaxis

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The families of the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI – cia-allergies.ca) thank MP Dean Allison (photo taken at Mr. Allison’s Beamsville office).

 

Anaphylaxis was debated again in Parliament yesterday.  MP Dean Allison, who is sponsoring a motion to raise awareness of anaphylaxis, spoke about the motives behind his Motion-230.

       On the first day of discussion in the House, I referred to the stories of Lucas, Liam and David. Their daily struggles with anaphylaxis and the fear of reaction can be reduced. Motion No. 230 aims for this goal. By bringing more attention and awareness to the Canadian public, this motion will help these children and many other Canadians who live with this condition. It will help Canadians understand the signs, dangers and consequences of an anaphylactic reaction.

       Although these considerable steps have been taken, more can be done. Businesses and governments should do more to help those who live with the condition. More specifically, Parliament should recognize that anaphylaxis is a serious condition and create the necessary awareness to help those living with anaphylaxis have a higher quality of life.

       Preventive measures should be taken by everyday Canadians in order to ensure the safety of those around them, especially those at risk of having an anaphylactic reaction. Understanding the condition and which allergens could cause reactions could lead to a reduction of incidents and more peace of mind for Canadians living with severe life-threatening allergies. With the passing of Motion No. 230, Canadians living with anaphylaxis will receive much needed recognition from our government. We stand with them in their efforts to promote awareness of the condition.

 

Mississauga MP Brad Butt spoke to the statistics in Canada, that demonstrate the magnitude of anaphylaxis and the importance of bringing it to national attention.

  • It is estimated that 2.5 million Canadians live with anaphylaxis and the number continues to rise every year.
  • 3,500 Canadians experience anaphylactic shock each year from eating the wrong foods.
  • Of those 3,500, about a dozen will die unfortunately.
  • One in two Canadians know someone with a serious food allergy. Alarmingly, it is most prevalent in young children, specifically those under three years of age.
  • Close to 6% of children below the age of three, and 300,000 youth under 18 are affected by general food allergies.
  • The frequency of food allergies has increased 350% from 1996 to 2002.
  • The prevalence of peanut and nut allergies has increased 250% over that time.
  • More than 40% of Canadians examine the ingredient information on food labels, either for themselves or for someone living with anaphylaxis.
  • The most recognized allergy, of course, is the one to peanuts. This allergy affects two out of 100 children in Canada.
  • Even with great vigilance, someone with a nut allergy will have an accidental episode every three to five years. 

 

The Member of Parliament urged his colleagues to support the motion:

       Motion No. 230 is about more awareness so that Canadians will become familiar with the risks of anaphylaxis and will hopefully take precautions to limit accidental exposure for those who may be vulnerable. This, in turn, will create a safer environment for everyone.

       More awareness of this serious medical condition is needed on a nationwide level. That is why I urge members of this House to approve this motion and launch anaphylaxis further onto the national stage. By adopting this motion, the Canadian government would be taking another important step forward in ensuring that Canadians living with anaphylaxis are able to maintain a higher quality of life.

 

Click here to read the full Parliamentary M-230 debate from yesterday.