Top-10 Modern Phrases Originating from a Shakespeare Play

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Here are the Merriam-Webster on-line dictionary’s top-10 phrases used in our language today that have been taken from one of the masterful Bard’s works.

 

#1: Green-Eyed Monster

#2: In a Pickle

#3: Love is Blind

#4: Salad Days

#5: Wear My Heart on My Sleeve

#6: There’s the Rub

#7: Cruel to Be Kind

#8: Wild Goose Chase

#9: Dogs of War

#10: Strange Bedfellows

 

To have the sayings sourced and to learn of their common usage today, we encourage you to go to the dictionary’s slide presentation.

 

(ED. – This is a repost that originally appeared in By George Journal in July 2010.)

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Top-10 Modern Phrases Originating from a Shakespeare Play

William_Shakespeare_1609Here is a top-10 list of Shakespearean phrases most frequently used in our language today, as complied by the Merriam-Webster on-line dictionary.

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Yes indeed, the Bard lives!

 

#1: Green-Eyed Monster

 

#2: In a Pickle

 

#3: Love is Blind

 

#4: Salad Days

 

#5: Wear My Heart on My Sleeve

 

#6: There’s the Rub

 

#7: Cruel to Be Kind

 

#8: Wild Goose Chase

 

#9: Dogs of War

 

#10: Strange Bedfellows

 

To have the sayings sourced and to learn of their common usage today, we encourage you to go to the dictionary’s presentation – Merriam Webster’s Top 10 phrases from Shakespeare.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Shakespearean phrases frequently used in today’s discourse (2)

Here’s are 30 more of the Bard’s memorable sayings still in use today.

 

  • In the twinkling of an eye
  • It was Greek to me
  • Love is blind
  • Make your hair stand on end
  • Milk of human kindness
  • Much Ado about Nothing
  • Mum’s the word
  • Out of the jaws of death
  • Pound of flesh
  • Rhyme nor reason
  • Screw your courage to the sticking place
  • Short shrift
  • Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ’em
  • Star crossed lovers
  • Such stuff as dreams are made on
  • The Devil incarnate
  • The game is up
  • The Queen’s English
  • There’s method in my madness
  • This is the short and the long of it
  • To be or not to be, that is the question
  • To gild refined gold, to paint the lily
  • To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub
  • Too much of a good thing
  • Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown
  • Vanish into thin air
  • Wear your heart on your sleeve
  • What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet
  • Wild goose chase
  • Woe is me

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Shakespearean phrases frequently used in today’s discourse (1)

There are many, many phrases and quotes that William Shakespeare penned for his plays centuries ago that are still frequently used today. In the first of two postings, here’s a selected list of 30 of the most common of the Bard’s memorable – and timeless – sayings.

 

  • A dish fit for the gods
  • A fool’s paradise
  • A foregone conclusion
  • A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse
  • A plague on both your houses
  • A sorry sight
  • All corners of the world
  • All that glitters is not gold
  • All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players
  • All’s well that ends well
  • As dead as a doornail
  • As good luck would have it
  • As pure as the driven snow
  • At one fell swoop
  • Come what come may
  • Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war
  • Eaten out of house and home
  • Fight fire with fire
  • For ever and a day
  • Frailty, thy name is woman
  • Good riddance
  • Green eyed monster
  • He will give the Devil his due
  • Heart’s content
  • His beard was as white as snow
  • Hoist by your own petard
  • I have not slept one wink
  • If music be the food of love, play on
  • In a pickle
  • In my mind’s eye

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The Mastery of William Shakespeare

  • All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts – (As You Like It – Act II, Scene VII)
  • Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them. – (Twelfth Night – Act II, Scene V)
  • Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more: it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. – (Macbeth – Act V, Scene V)
  • This above all: to thine own self be true. – (Hamlet – Act I, Scene III)
  • Nothing will come of nothing. – (King Lear – Act I, Scene I)
  • Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings. – (Julius Caesar – Act I, Scene II)
  • What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. – (Romeo and Juliet – Act II, Scene II)
  • Thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges. – (Taming of the Shrew – Act V, Scene I)
  • There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. – (Hamlet – Act II, Scene II)
  • Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, it seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come. – (Julius Caesar – Act II, Scene II)
  • A man can die but once. – (King Henry IV, Part II – Act III, Scene II)
  • Fair is foul, and foul is fair. – (Macbeth – Act I, Scene I)
  • I am a man more sinned against than sinning. – (King Lear – Act III, Scene II)
  • Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. – (Julius Caesar – Act III, Scene II)
  • Have more than thou showest, speak less than thou knowest, lend less than thou owest. – (King Lear – Act I, Scene IV)
  • The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool. – (As You Like It – Act V, Scene I)
  • If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?. – (The Merchant of Venice – Act III, Scene I)
  • Why, then the world ‘s mine oyster – (The Merry Wives of Windsor – Act II, Scene II)
  • Out of the jaws of death. – (Taming of the Shrew – Act III, Scene IV)
  • Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. – (Julius Caesar – Act III, Scene II)
  • Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. – (King Henry IV, Part II – Act III, Scene I)
  • Cry “Havoc,” and let slip the dogs of war. – (Julius Caesar – Act III, Scene I)
  • The worst is not, So long as we can say, ‘This is the worst.’. – (King Lear – Act IV, Scene I)
  • We are such stuff as dreams are made on, rounded with a little sleep. – (The Tempest – Act IV, Scene I)
  • To be, or not to be: that is the question. – ( Hamlet – Act III, Scene I)