Workplace Tip: How to Listen

In a LinkedIn article, By George recently saw Dr. Travis Bradberry’s “7 Things Fabulous Listeners Do Differently

 

Bradberry rightly points out that listening is a skill you want to be great at. He cites a recent study conducted at George Washington University showed that listening can influence up to 40% of a leader’s job performance.

 

Effective listening is something that can absolutely be learned and mastered. There are straightforward strategies that can make you a better listener.  Here are Bradberry’s 7 tips:

 

  1. Focus — The biggest mistake most people make when it comes to listening is they’re so focused on what they’re going to say next or how what the other person is saying is going to affect them that they fail to hear what’s being said.

 

  1. Put away your phone — When you commit to a conversation, focus all your energy on the conversation.

 

  1. Ask good questions — People like to know you’re listening, and something as simple as a clarification question shows not only that you are listening but that you also care about what they’re saying.

 

  1. Practice reflective listening – Psychologist Carl Rogers used the term “reflective listening” to describe the listening strategy of paraphrasing the meaning of what’s being said in order to make certain you’ve interpreted the speaker’s words correctly.

 

  1. Use positive body language – Become cognizant of your gestures, expressions, and tone of voice (and making certain they’re positive).

 

  1. Don’t pass judgment — If you want to be a good listener, you must be open-minded. Being open-minded makes you approachable and interesting to others.

 

  1. Keep your mouth shut – If you’re not checking for understanding or asking a probing question, you shouldn’t be talking. Not only does thinking about what you’re going to say next take your attention away from the speaker, hijacking the conversation shows that you think you have something more important to say.

 

This post comprises of excerpts from the original. Read Dr. Bradberry’s full article here…

Source:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/7-things-fabulous-listeners-do-differently-dr-travis-bradberry

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Workplace Tip: How to Talk

In a great Inc.com article, Bill Murphey Jr. reveals “17 Verbal Habits of Highly Likeable People

 

It starts with what you say–and what you know not to say.  Murphey contends that how you listen to people will add (or take away from) your charisma.  Here are some of the most important things highly likeable people do every day.

 

  1. They are polite when then can be — Words like “please” and “thank you” might be technically unnecessary but they’re invaluable if you want to be more charismatic.

 

  1. They acknowledge small favors — “You’re welcome.” These two short words communicate much more than “no problem” (or, of course, “yup”) when someone thanks you for something.

 

  1. They offer meaningful praise — The key word here is “meaningful.” Charismatic people give sincere compliments–never bashful, never obsequious. When someone merits praise, they say so.

 

  1. They express sincere empathy — They use phrases like, “That must have made you feel proud,” or “I can imagine you must feel angry,” thus both exploring and validating other people’s feelings. Everybody wants to be understood.

 

  1. They share useful information — Some people like to hoard information because they think it makes them more powerful. Don’t be that person.

 

  1. They offer to help — The most charismatic people among us start simply by looking for chances to help–in their families, in their communities, and in the small moments of their day-to-day lives.

 

  1. They speak with justifiable confidence — They don’t boast or brag. But when faced with challenging situations–especially things that affect other people–they’re the ones who approach the problem with an air of calmness, curiosity, and confidence.

 

  1. They use names and titles that connote respect — Charismatic people remember other people’s names, and use their titles in circumstances when it makes those people feel good.

 

  1. They express their faith in others — Four simple words: “I believe in you.”

 

  1. They remember that they’re part of a team — A sense of camaraderie makes tough situations bearable. Having a sense of humor can even make them fun.

 

  1. They make introductions — Want to know five of the nicest words anyone can ever say to two people at the same time? “I’d like you to meet….” .

 

  1. They take their turn — Likable people aren’t afraid to step up when it’s their turn to do something enjoyable, or even to bear the burden of something that isn’t so great.

 

  1. They let others make their own decisions — Truly charismatic people have confidence in their opinions–but they also recognize that other people may legitimately see things differently.

 

  1. They listen–and they want to hear more — Highly likable people are active and sincere listeners. You can tell them your opinion or a story or ask for their advice, and they respond with questions and verbal cues that suggest they’re present in the moment.

 

  1. They take responsibility — When it’s their job or their fault, they step up. They take control of the things they’re supposed to have control over.

 

  1. They voice their support — We all appreciate people who stand by us and who let us know that they’re there.

 

  1. They ask, “Why not?” — Likable people are often dreamers, optimists, and doers. RFK put it best: “There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why? I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?”

 

This post comprises of excerpts from the original. Read the full article here…

SOURCE:  https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/want-to-be-more-charismatic-17-verbal-habits-of-highly-likable-people.html

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

8 Things You Should Do After 8 P.M.

Here are some great tips on how to unplug and recharge. These suggestions are from a column written by Elle Kaplan in Thrive Global of LinkedIn:  “8 Things You Should Do After 8 P.M. If You Want to Be Happy and Successful — Wake up on the right side of the bed tomorrow.”

 

Elle Kaplan tells you hows you how to set yourself up to have a more productive day.

 

  1. Strolls by the moonlight

Adopt a routine of nighttime walks to decompress.

 

  1. Unplug. Literally.

Unplug everything besides your alarm clock, and watch the tension recede. Unplugging is also a key to a good night’s sleep.

 

  1. Sleep hygiene

Sleep hygiene is about more than just making your bed. Give yourself at least an hour to unwind before you actually doze off.

 

  1. Read up

Bill Gates found great success by reading for one hour every night, no matter what.

 

  1. Prioritize

You can avoid the morning scramble by laying out clear goals and priorities for tomorrow.  You’ll reduce your anxiety, and you’ll rest easy knowing you already have your ducks in a row.

 

  1. Stop mid-sentence

“The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next,” Ernst Hemmingway once said. “If you do that every day… you will never be stuck.”

 

  1. School’s in

One of the best times to learn is after a long and exhausting day. Learn something new while winding down.

 

  1. Write your stress away

Writing down our problems reduces open “loops” of bad thoughts, and washes away anxiety.

 

FULL ARTICLE:  “8 Things You Should Do After 8 P.M. If You Want to Be Happy and Successful — Wake up on the right side of the bed tomorrow.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Harold S. Geneen sharing good business sense

Here are a dozen quotes on a decent approach to the world of business from the legendary, American corporate leader Harold S. Geneen.

  • The worst disease which can afflict executives in their work is not, as popularly supposed, alcoholism; it’s egotism.
  • You can’t run a business or anything else on a theory.
  • In business, words are words; explanations are explanations, promises are promises, but only performance is reality.
  • Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions.
  • Leadership cannot really be taught, it can only be learned.
  • Better a good decision quickly than the best decision too late.
  • A true leader has to have a genuine open-door policy so that his people are not afraid to approach him for any reason.
  • I don’t believe in just ordering people to do things. You have to sort of grab an oar and row with them.
  • The best way to inspire people to superior performance is to convince them by everything you do and by your everyday attitude that you are wholeheartedly supporting them.
  • The only unforgivable sin in business is to run out of cash.
  • Telephones, hotels, insurance—it’s all the same. If you know the numbers inside out, you know the company inside out.
  • In the business world, everyone is paid in two coins: Cash and Experience. Take the experience first. The cash will come later.

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

30 Behaviors That Will Make You Unstoppable

This is an excerpt from blogger and writer Benjamin Hardy’s list of suggestions for “what it takes to succeed.” It was first posted in Thrive Global on LinkedIn.

 

  1. Don’t think — know and act.

“Don’t think. You already know what you have to do, and you know how to do it. What’s stopping you?” — Tim Grover

Rather than analyzing and thinking, act.

 

  1. Always be prepared so you have the freedom to act on instinct.

Become a master of your craft. Learn the left-brained rules in and out so your right brain can have limitless freedom to break the rules and create.

 

  1. Don’t be motivated by money or anything external.

 

  1. Never be satisfied.

“The drive to close the gap between near-perfect and perfect is the difference between great and unstoppable.” — Tim Grover… Even after you achieve a goal, you’re not content. For you, it’s not even about the goal. It’s about the climb to see how far you can push yourself.

 

  1. Always be in control.

Act based on instinct, not impulse.

 

  1. Be true to yourself.

Unstoppable people purge everything from their life they hate. Have the self-respect and confidence to live life on your terms.

 

  1. Never let off the pressure.

“Pressure can bust pipes, but it also can make diamonds.” — Robert Horry… Pressure is what keeps you alert and active.

 

  1. Don’t be afraid of the consequences of failure.

It’s all in your head. If something goes wrong — if you “fail” — you adjust and keep going.

 

  1. Don’t compete with others. Make them compete with you.

Competing with others makes absolutely zero sense to you. It pulls you from your authentic zone. So you zone out all the external noise and instead zone in to your internal pressure to produce.

 

  1. Never stop learning.

When you’re relentless, success only increases the pressure to do more. Immediately following the achievement of a goal, you’re focused on your next challenge.

 

  1. Don’t get crushed by success.

“Success can become a catalyst for failure.” — Greg McKeown… But for you, no external noise can push harder than your own internal pressure. It’s not about this achievement, but the one after, and the one after that. There is no destination. Only when you’re finished.

 

  1. Completely own it when you screw up.

No blame. No deception or illusion. Just the cold hard truth. When you mess up, you own it.

 

  1. Let your work speak for itself.

“Well done, is well said.” — Anthony Liccione

 

  1. Always work on your mental strength.

The better you can be under pressure, the further you’ll go than anyone else. The best training you will ever do is mental training.

 

  1. Confidence is your greatest asset.

You’ve heard it before: Running a marathon is far more mental than physical. A person’s ability to run a marathon — or do anything hard — is more a reflection of their level of confidence than their actual ability.

 

  1. Surround yourself with people who remind you of the future, not the past.

Surrounding yourself with people who you want to be like allows you a fresh slate. You’re no longer defined by your past, only the future you are creating.

 

  1. Let things go, but never forget.

 

  1. Have clear goals.

 

  1. Respond immediately, rather than analyzing or stalling.

“He who hesitates is lost.” — Cato… Just do it. Train yourself to respond immediately when you feel you should do something. Stop questioning yourself. Don’t analyze it. Don’t question if it came from God or from yourself. Just act.

 

  1. Choose simplicity over complication.

“If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” — Albert Einstein…

Cutting to the core and hitting the truth is hard, because it’s simple. As Leonardo da Vinci has said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

 

  1. Never be jealous or envious of someone else’s accomplishments.

 

  1. Take the shot every time.

You miss every shot you don’t take. The only way you can become unstoppable is if you stop thinking about it. Just take the shot.

 

  1. Don’t get caught up in the results of your success. Always remain focused on what got you those results: the work.

It can get easy to “ride the wave” of your previous work. Keep practicing. Perfect your craft. Never forget what got you here.

 

  1. Think and act 10X.

“When 10X is your measuring stick, you immediately see how you can bypass what everyone else is doing.” — Dan Sullivan… When you take your goal of earning $100,000 this year and change it to $1,000,000, you’re forced to operate at a different level. The logical and traditional approach doesn’t work with 10X.

 

  1. Set goals that far exceed your current capabilities.

If your goals are logical, they won’t force you to create luck. Being unstoppable means your goals challenge you to be someone more than you currently are. As Jim Rohn has said, “Don’t wish it was easier, wish you were better.”

 

  1. Make time for recovery and rejuvenation.

“Wherever you are, make sure you’re there.” — Dan Sullivan… Recovering from my work generally consists of writing in my journal, listening to music, spending time with my wife and kids, preparing and eating delicious food, or serving other people. These things rejuvenate me. They make my work possible, but also meaningful.

 

  1. Start before you’re ready.

“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” — Chinese Proverb

 

  1. If you need permission, you probably shouldn’t do it.

No one will ever give you permission to live your dreams.

 

  1. Don’t make exceptions.

 

Read the full article here: 30 behaviors that will make you unstoppable

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.