Tag Archives: CG&A

A Summary on “The Future of News”

This week, By George Journal posted the insight of many of our leading news personalities as they considered, “What will be the future of news?”

Prompted by an excellent series of articles in the Business Insider, we explored the possibilities of what our new digital realities will mean for the news industry, reporting, and the delivery of information.

Our By George Journal commentary: The Future of News

The Business Insider’s special report on the future of news:  The Future of News is Going to be Awesome

News personalities’ opinions from the pages of The Business Insider:

Insights into the Future of News

Insights into the Future of News (2)

Insights into the Future of News (3)

Insights into the Future of News (4)

Also, two weeks ago, Canadians also witnessed the passing of a torch on the country’s most-watched nightly newscast. By George Journal paid tribute to this event – saying goodbye to Lloyd Robertson:

Having to say “Goodbye” to our trusted Lloyd Robertson

…and hello to Lisa LaFlamme:

Lisa LaFlamme – beginning the new era of CTV News 

In closing this review of the future of news, we quote Arianna Huffington, President & Editor-In-Chief of AOL Huffington Post Media Group, who says, “The future of news is about connection and engagement…” Today, there is growing involvement of the public in the development of news stories. According to the many newsmen who shared their insight, we can expect this involvement to increase in the years to come. The Internet is the “game-changer.” It has allowed news to become a participatory sport – that will come with new playbooks and responsibilities – and, undoubtedly, with growing pains. By George Journal will continue to explore and report on this fascinating transformation of “news.”

An Update on Our Anaphylaxis Activities

Readers of this Journal will know that we are active advocates for Canadians with severe, life-threatening allergies. (Tag: anaphylaxis for past articles)

Chris George is part of a group that formed in Fall 2010 to work with MPs and raise the level of awareness for anaphylaxis in Parliament and with the Ottawa bureaucracy. The Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI) has had some initial successes in grabbing the attention of Members of Parliament and prompting a debate in the House of Commons last March.  (Hansard link: http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&DocId=5039495#OOB-3811430

Today, CG&A COMMUNICATIONS issued a press release which provided an update on the current activities of the CAI. The group is poised to continue their advocacy efforts in Ottawa once the House of Commons resumes this September.  Chris George says, “…we’re persistent and ever-hopeful that our efforts will prompt action in Ottawa. We want to forge the necessary connections between those decision- and policy-makers in the federal government and those Canadians who are coping with life-threatening allergies.”

Here is the full release:  http://cgacommunications.com/main/?p=298

The Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative has launched a website to inform Canadians (and especially those people in Ottawa who are entrusted with responding to emerging medical and safety concerns in our country).  Visit the website: 

http://cai-allergies.ca/

In the months ahead, watch for more news of the CAI advocacy efforts on its new website and on the CAI Facebook page (ed. – and, of course, here in the By George Journal).

Top 50 favourite @ByGeorgeJournal Tweets (2)

Here are our top 50 favourite tweets of the first 500 @byGeorgeJournal tweets (this is the second of a two-part post):

  • Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending. – Maria Robinson
  • Insist on yourself. Never imitate. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out. – Robert Collier
  • The virtue lies in the struggle, not in the prize.- Richard Monckton Milnes
  • Looking for the dream makes us forget we are standing in the middle of one we use to have right now. – D. Carrizales
  • Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing. – Abe Lincoln
  • Great works are performed, not by strength, but by perseverance. – Samuel Johnson
  • If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things. – Albert Einstein
  • Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. – Aristotle
  • What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • To change one’s life: 1. Start immediately. 2. Do it flamboyantly. 3. No exceptions. – William James
  • Sow an action and you reap a habit; sow a habit and you reap a character; sow a character and you reap a destiny. – William James
  • You cannot dream yourself into character; you must hammer and forge yourself one. – J.A. Froude
  • The key is not to prioritize what’s on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities. – Stephen Covey
  • 10% of our lives is decided by uncontrollable circumstances. 90% is decided by how we react to those circumstances. – Unknown
  • Believe those who are seeking the truth; doubt those who find it. – Andre Gide
  • In this Internet age of faceless communications, words wield great power. Our challenge is to use with caution, use with grace. – Chris George
  • 10 persons who speak make more noise than 10,000 who are silent. – Napoleon Bonaparte
  • We must be the change we wish to see in the world. – Mahatma Gandhi
  • Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to be needed. – Storm Jameson
  • Do what you love. Know your own bone; gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still. – Thoreau
  • The difference between the impossible and the possible lies in a person’s determination. – Tommy Lasorda
  • It’s hard to beat a person who never gives up. – Babe Ruth
  • You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do. – Henry Ford
  • People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. – Mark Twain

Our core mission on Twitter is to provide memorable quotes to motivate and inspire – and provoke. You can follow the By George Journal on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal

Top 50 favourite @ByGeorgeJournal Tweets

Yesterday, By George Journal tweeted its 500th tweet.  Our core mission on Twitter is to provide memorable quotes to motivate and inspire – and provoke. (We also offer views on Canada, public relations, the world of politics and business.) You can follow us:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal

Here are our top 50 favourite tweets of the first 500 @byGeorgeJournal tweets (this is the first of a two-part post): 

  • To want to be what one can be is purpose in life. – Cynthia Ozick
  • They may forget what you said, but they will never forget how you made them feel. – Carl W. Buechner
  • We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit. – Aristotle
  • Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going. – Jim Rohn
  • Success is not to be pursued; it is to be attracted by the person we become. – Jim Rohn
  • Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts. – Albert Einstein
  • Happiness comes when we test our skills towards some meaningful purpose. – John Stosssel
  • If you have the courage to begin, you have the courage to succeed. – David Viscott
  • We were born to succeed, not to fail. – Henry David Thoreau
  • Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed, is more important than any other one thing. – Abraham Lincoln
  • Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. – Thomas Edison
  • You become a champion by fighting one more round. When things are tough, you fight one more round. – James J. Corbett
  • Never mistake motion for action. – Ernest Hemingway
  • Weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character. – Albert Einstein
  • Ability will enable a man to get to the top, but character will keep him from falling. – American proverb
  • You have to learn the rules of the game. And then you have to play better than anyone else. – Albert Einstein
  • We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give. – Winston Churchill
  • Never mistake knowledge for wisdom. One helps you make a living the other helps you make a life. – E Roosevelt
  • We have to do the best we can. This is our sacred human responsibility. – Albert Einstein
  • A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, & his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. – Oscar Wilde
  • Strive for excellence, not perfection. – Jackson Brown Jr.
  • Common sense is not so common. – Voltaire
  • There’s no substitute for hard work. – Thomas Edison
  • Happiness depends upon ourselves. – Aristotle
  • Life is a series of commas, not periods. – Matthew McConaughey

Anaphylaxis awareness motion back in Parliament

MP Dean Allison has re-introduced his anaphylaxis awareness motion in the House of Commons yesterday.  Motion-230 reads: That in the opinion of the House, anaphylaxis is a serious concern for an increasing number of Canadians and the government should take the appropriate measures necessary to ensure these Canadians are able to maintain a high quality of life.

Our volunteer group of families from across Canada have come together to form the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI). The group currently has a Facebook page and soon will have a website dedicated to news of the advance of anaphylaxis issues in Ottawa.

The families involved in the CAI are renewing our efforts with this new Parliament to prompt change in how the federal government responds to the many concerns Canadians with severe allergies must deal with in their daily lives.

Thank you to Dean Allison for this motion, which will now serve us as a focal point for discussions with MPs and federal bureaucrats.  And we have many MPs to thank for their continued commitment to this issue – MPs Bob Dechert, Malcolm Allen, Megan Leslie, Ron Canon, Joy Smith, Bob Rae, Carolyn Bennett, Cheryl Gallant – the MP who started this initiative two Parliament’s back – Rick Dykstra – and over 40 more MPs who have responded positively to our awareness drive.  With their collective efforts, in the previous Parliament, Dean Allison was able to achieve all-Party support for this motion – and we hope and trust more positive results in this Parliament from our MPs.

Please visit the on-line news source Niagara At Large to read the media release on Motion-230:  http://niagaraatlarge.com/2011/06/16/niagara-mp-reintroduces-motion-to-raise-awareness-for-anaphylaxis/

Visit CAI Facebook page for more information:  https://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Canadian-Anaphylaxis-Initiative/131919763524514

(Photo is from Dec 2010 when CAI representatives Chris George, Cindy Paskey and Debbie Bruce visited with the MP in his Ottawa office.)

Our “Cherry Bombs” were popular

In a series of tweets last week, the By George Journal highlighted the colourful life of sports commentator Don Cherry. Taken largely from the Toronto Star news expose “The wonderful, unlivable life of Don Cherry” written by Vinay Menon, we offered many quotes and tidbits of information about the man who has become a Canadian icon.

Our Don Cherry Twitter series and our previous blog article, posted on the eve of the Stanley Cup finals, got By George Journal featured in The Fan Zoo Hockey Daily last week.

Here are those quotes and facts, first issued on the ByGeorgeJournal Twitter channel:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal 

  • “I mean everything I say.” – #DonCherry
  • “They (CBC) really did not like me. But I think I became so popular they had no choice.”
  • “Television is a jungle… is a tough business… Everybody hopes you fail.”
  • “I’m a construction worker. I’m not a performer.” ~ on his approach to TV broadcast
  •  “Once you start thinking you’re a big star & stuff like that, then u lose something.” ~ on his approach to TV
  • “Better suits.” ~ on the only change since becoming a celebrity sports commentator
  • “Cherry occupies a rarefied place in the pantheon of Canadian celebrity.” – TorStar reporter Vinay Menon
  • “It really toughens you. Nothing can hurt you after that.” – #DonCherry on 16 yrs in minor #hockey
  •  “I grew up with a lot of Scots and Irish who were construction workers. I picked up a lot of their expressions.”
  • “I honest to God still think of myself as a 32-year-old hockey player who worked on construction in the summer.”
  • #DonCherry priorities: “As long as I can get home at night and have my three or four beers and my steamer (sauna).”
  • Dghtr Cindy on her Father: “I haven’t seen him change 1 iota. Sometimes people mellow w age, but that doesn’t apply to D.C.”
  • The great Bobby Orr on #DonCherry: ““He’s the most consistent man I know.”
  • Brian Williams on #DonCherry: “Don is about integrity & values. He believes if u do something, u do it for the proper reasons…”
  • Believe it? #DonCherry reads books on Lawrence of Arabia, Sir Francis Drake, Lord Nelson & writings of Horatio Alger & Miguel de Cervantes.
  • Ron MacLean: #DonCherry “is an essayist who is trying to combine a little bit of journalism, a little bit of philosophy & theology.”
  • Ron MacLean: #DonCherry “is trying to convince the world of the need for honour….”
  • “…in our world, it’s very easy 2 be isolated from a deeper conversation about those kinds of lessons.” MacLean on #DonCherry
  • “The game has lost a lot of honour. There’s no doubt they skate faster and they’re bigger…”
  • “…but they don’t respect one another like they used to and I don’t think the intensity is there.” – #DonCherry #quotes #hockey #hnic #nhl

Join us on Twitter for topical information and bons mots:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal

Raising Awareness in Ottawa for Anaphylaxis

Our efforts for greater awareness of anaphylaxis have resumed…

The Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI) issued a press release yesterday and our favourite local, on-line news source Niagara At Large published the news.  Visit:  

http://niagaraatlarge.com/2011/05/31/anaphylaxis-awareness-effort-resumes-with-return-of-federal-parliament/

     Lead:  This week when Members of Parliament return to the House of Commons, Niagara West – Glanbrook MP Dean Allison will be picking up where he left off before the election, assisting Canadian families in raising greater awareness of the health and quality of life challenges posed by living with severe, life-threatening allergies (anaphylaxis).

     Quote:  “We are prepared to push the re-start button this week. Our families are very appreciative of Dean’s commitment to get the Motion back in Parliament and to make sure the Health Minister and her officials, and others, are kept focused on the positive steps they can take to improve quality of life for Canadian families living with anaphylaxis.”

CAI is looking for a number of steps to be taken in the months ahead. With the focus being Dean Allison’s motion, we will pursue the following policy points:

1. Federal Coordination – of programs and services dealing with anaphylaxis and food allergy information
2. Coordinated Awareness Campaigns – both targeted and general public information initiatives
3. Long Term Commitment to Research – a strategic response and more dollars for research  
4. Improved Allergen Labelling – for foods, drugs, cosmetic and personal care products
5. Improved Transportation Safeguards – airline and public transportation policies that reduce risk for food allergic passengers

We ask all Canadian families to make their points of view known on the serious matter of reducing the risks for individuals with severe, life-threatening allergies.  You can help:

  • Spread the word of this great news.  Encourage other families to get involved.
  • Contact your MP – ask for his/her support.  Visit.  Phone.  Email.  Write.
  • Post to your Facebook page – click ‘like’ to show support.  Go to Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative Facebook page.
  • Blog. Tweat. Join on-line dialogues. Participate in dialogue on Allergic Living’s forum.  Go to Allergic Living Forum – Advocacy and Accommodations.

Go to the NASK website for updates on how the organization is advancing these issues in Ottawa. Visit:  http://www.nask.ca/events.html

Allergic Living website is here:  http://allergicliving.com

On Facebook, visit the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative.

My Right Hand – a social media service

After a few months collaborating with our network, our public relations company CG&A COMMUNICATIONS is unwrapping My Right Hand.  We are offering a virtual assistant service that will support and enhance clients’ social media activities. The core strategy and content development services include: 

  • Content and Copywriting Services – articles and blog posts, media releases, web content; proofreading and editing; identify value-added links, videos, photos, surveys, etc.
  • Internet Design and Development Services – create new site(s) architecture or improve existing one; develop websites, blogs, microsites, brochureware sites
  • Online Management Services – create and manage your social media accounts via blogs, Facebook and Twitter; stakeholder relations including moderating comments and developing content so that you are an active participant
  • Monitoring and Analysis – monitor your communications and produce “Interaction Reports”; suggestions to meet the stated communications objectives; develop your content marketing strategy

To read more information on My Right Hand, today’s press release is here:

http://cgacommunications.com/main/?p=292

Or find out more from the CG&A COMMUNICATIONS website:

http://cgacommunications.com/main/?page_id=255

3 Favourite Videos of By George – A Redux

Here are three of our favourite fascinating videos. (Relax, this is a diversion…)

1) Every time we see this video, the message overwhelms me.  It is truly remarkable – a must-see (over 5.5 million views to date!).  ‘The Story of Stuff’ bills itself as a 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. Given what is happening to our North American economy, we suggest you should refer this link to all your friends. – Chris

http://www.storyofstuff.com/

2) For those who wonder what our young minds, the generations of today and tomorrow are up against, take a look at this most revealing video: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cL9Wu2kWwSY&feature=fvw

3) There is truly one unforgettable video available on-line that will move you and make a difference in the way you look at life (and death).   On September 18, 2007, computer science professor Randy Pausch stepped in front of an audience of 400 people at Carnegie Mellon University to deliver a last lecture called “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams.”  

https://www.bygeorgejournal.ca/?p=25

Finally, here’s a LOL – It’s ‘elfish’ for sure!

https://www.bygeorgejournal.ca/?p=190

Best re-posts of 2009 – Certainly, our #1 is on Hockey

Hockey is the glue that binds our Nation

https://www.bygeorgejournal.ca/?p=460

In order to be a dynamic, sustainable national entity, a country’s people must have shared values, perspectives, and experiences. A country’s peoples must know and understand certain common things – whether they be moments in time, or iconic images that stir a common passion. In Canada our sense of national identity has become blurred through the past two to three decades largely because we are loosing our national common identifiers. And we are losing our sense of being because we no longer collectively share special moments or recognize and appreciate meaningful symbols.

So, one needs to ask “What do we have in Canada to unite us? What will provide that sense of nationalism that can pull us together and have us share moments in time – that can become our peoples’ common memories and source of pride?”

We offer that our national game of hockey is the glue that binds our nation.

Hockey is a shared experience that transcends pucks and ice surfaces.  Hockey envelops everything from pre-dawn breakfasts and cold car rides to the smell of locker rooms and those smiles and arena exchanges with your children. There are tens of thousands of Canadian children who love the game and dream of being the next Gretzky or Crosby. There is a legend of parents who come together to converse and share moments in the rinks and the parking lots. And there is Saturday night. Imagine how many households have the HNIC ritual of cheering the opening face-off and needing to hear Don Cherry bark through another Coach’s Corner. 

Hockey is the reference point for Canada. Quite simply, it is what defines us.

Hockey defines us in a way that other things do not – or can no longer. For example, Canada is beyond being defined by its two founding Nations.  This has given way to multiculturalism and, today, we have our three most populous urban centres as, literally, cultural mosaics. What of bilingualism? A native heritage? Our historic memberships in the commonwealth or NATO? None of these strike a resounding chord with our current society.

Canadians no longer rally around historic icons like our founding father Sir John A, the Mounties, the mighty moose or maple syrup? Many Canadians have never seen a canoe or an inukshuk – so these symbols simply cannot provide a common reference point.  Perhaps there is a case for the maple leaf icon and our ensign – but Canadians differ greatly on what our red-and-white flag represents and the maple leaf is less a shared symbol of national passion than it is a default icon representing the notion of our country.

So, the contention is hockey is the glue that binds…. and in the months ahead the By George Journal will celebrate hockey and explore the idea of this glorious game is “the defining element” of Canada – our peoples’ source of “being Canadian.”

(ed. – This is a repost, picked as one of our favourite three posts of 2009, taken from the earlier posts on the By George Journal. We have tagged “ hockey” and you can read much more on this glorious sport in By George. ) 

Our favourite 25 quotes

As regular readers of the By George Journal know, we are on Twitter, tweeting favourite quotes and observations about leadership, success, a healthy attitude and life.  Here are our current Favourite 25: 

  1. Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. – Aristotle
  2. A ship is safe in harbour, but that’s not what ships are for. – William Shedd
  3. People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. – Mark Twain
  4. If you cannot do great things, do small things in a great way. – Napoleon Hill
  5. Believe those who are seeking the truth; doubt those who find it. – Andre Gide
  6. Respect all. Admire some. Idolize none. – Anonymous
  7. The first rule of focus is ”Wherever you are, be there.” – Anonymous
  8. Great minds have purposes, little minds have wishes. – Washington Irving
  9. You cannot dream yourself into character; you must hammer and forge yourself one. – J.A. Froude
  10. It’s hard to beat a person who never gives up. – Babe Ruth
  11. 10 persons who speak make more noise than 10,000 who are silent. – Napoleon Bonaparte
  12. In this Internet age of faceless communications, words wield great power. Our challenge is to use with caution, use with grace. – Chris George
  13. To change one’s life: 1. Start immediately. 2. Do it flamboyantly. 3. No exceptions. – William James
  14. Sow an action and you reap a habit; sow a habit and you reap a character; sow a character and you reap a destiny. – William James
  15. Looking for the dream makes us forget we are standing in the middle of one we use to have right now. – D. Carrizales
  16. To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe. – Anatole France
  17. The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you never know if they are genuine. – Abraham Lincoln (as quoted by Camberley)
  18. Having a dream you don’t pursue is like buying an ice-cream cone and watching it melt all over your hand. – Frank Papasso
  19. We must be the change we wish to see in the world. – Mahatma Gandhi
  20. Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to be needed. – Storm Jameson
  21. Do what you love. Know your own bone; gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still. – Thoreau
  22. Success is simple: Do what’s right, the right way, at the right time. – Arnold H. Glasow
  23. You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do. – Henry Ford
  24. Insist on yourself. Never imitate. – Ralph Waldo Emerson:
  25. It is a luxury to be understood. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Join us on Twitter at:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal

Daily Motivation/Inspiration from BGJ Tweets

Recently, By George Journal has begun tweeting a few poignant motivational and inspirational quotes each day. Here are ten of our favourite from the past two weeks…

  1. Do what you love. Know your own bone; gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still. – Thoreau
  2. Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to be needed.- Storm Jameson
  3. Insist on yourself. Never imitate. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  4. Success is simple: Do what’s right, the right way, at the right time. – Arnold H. Glasow
  5. You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do. – Henry Ford
  6. Everything comes to him who hustles while he waits. – Thomas Edison
  7. One’s mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions. – Oliver Wendell Holmes
  8. A man should make all he can, and give all he can. – Nelson Rockefeller
  9. Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it. – Lou Holtz
  10. There is nothing that fear and hope does not permit men to do. – Marquis De Vauvenargues

Follow By George Journal on Twitter at:

http://twitter.com/#!/ByGeorgeJournal

Grassroots’ Efforts for Anaphylaxis Being Heard in Ottawa

Last spring when families met with local MPs Dean Allison and Rick Dykstra, there was little thought that 10 months later, Parliamentarians would be debating how the federal government may come to the assistance of Canadians diagnosed with anaphylaxis.

Yesterday, however, not only did Members of Parliament discuss anaphylaxis in the House of Commons, but they also came together to urge the federal government to consider tangible steps towards reducing the risk of anaphylactic attacks and raising the general public awareness of severe allergies.  The House of Commons debates can be found here:

http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&DocId=5039495#OOB-3811430

This debate was significant for three reasons.

  1. There was support from all political Parties and statements from each, acknowledging the seriousness of anaphylaxis in Canada.
  2. There was recognition that the motion had a clear set of five action items that required consideration by MPs and government officials.  
  3. There was a commitment by MPs to work together to advance the five policy areas raised during the debate.

Niagara-area MP Allison, who moved the debate motion, has been working with a group of Canadian families from across Canada to identify realistic measures that can help people with anaphylaxis. This group – the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative (CAI) – developed a five point policy agenda, which today is the focus of discussions with MPs and senior bureaucrats in Ottawa. (Here is the five point agenda backgrounder: http://www.nask.ca/files/5-Point%20Policy%20Items%20re%20Motion%20546.pdf )

In the weeks and months ahead, CAI supporters will continue to work with MPs and advance the discussions around safer environments for children and all Canadians who must cope with life-threatening allergies.  (Stay up to date on the CAI awareness efforts on Facebook.)

IN THE NEWS – Niagara This Week on the Parliamentary debate – “Motion pushes for federal allergies plan”

http://www.niagarathisweek.com/news/article/970159–motion-pushes-for-federal-allergies-plan

MP Dean Allison leads Parliamentary debate on anaphylaxis

Families across Canada, with a loved one with the medical condition anaphylaxis, applaud the efforts of MP Dean Allison as he took our concerns to the floor of the House of Commons. Here is an excerpt from Mr. Allison’s speech that captures his motives in advancing the motion.

     How can bringing forward such a motion and passing this motion help these and other families living with anaphylaxis? Perhaps my greatest goal with this motion is to increase awareness. Education tends to lead to more consideration from those who do not suffer toward those who do. I think about how it is now becoming common to be asked whether one has food allergies when being invited to weddings and other public events,and even smaller dinner parties with new friends. This would have seemed very strange 10 or 20 years ago, but as food allergy organizations have increasingly educated the public, we are seeing this type of consideration become more commonplace.

    As the general public learns more about the grave dangers facing anaphylaxis sufferers, they can take and are taking more precautions in their daily lives, reducing that burden that, until recently, tended to lie solely with the affected person and their families.

    Thoughtful Canadians are now asking about allergies before cooking meals for dinner guests. They are now packing lunches for their children that avoid some of the most common allergens. They are using more discretion in the snacks they choose to eat in public places where they might be sitting too close to someone with severe food allergies. This is very important in places like sports stadiums and classrooms but even more so on a plane or train where medical assistance may not be readily available should an anaphylactic attack occur. This type of consideration by non-allergy sufferers is becoming more commonplace and it is hoped that through greater awareness this level of thoughtfulness will only continue to increase. 

     To understand why this awareness and consideration is so highly sought by the anaphylaxis community, one must consider the fears that a parent of an affected child has on a daily basis. Let us imagine a father or mother who has seen first-hand their child having a life-threatening attack where, within minutes, their face and neck have swollen to become almost unrecognizable and the child struggles just to breathe.

    Let us imagine that each day when the child goes to school the parent is left worrying whether that child will unknowingly come into contact with the trigger that could cause a similar reaction. It could be something as simple and innocent as another child sharing a snack that could cause a life or death situation. These very real and terrifying fears of a parent can never go away, but collective steps can be taken to help ease them considerably….

 

… more can be done, and going forward there are five key areas where stakeholders have asked the federal government to consider further action: One, initiating awareness campaigns; two, greater federal coordination on anaphylaxis matters; three, a long-term commitment to research; four, improved transportation safeguards; and five, improved allergen labelling.

You can read Mr. Allison’s speech in full and the anaphylaxis debate in the House of Commons here:

http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&DocId=5039495#OOB-3811430

Working towards solutions for Canadians with anaphylaxis

Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative is an advocacy effort marshaled by a volunteer group of families from anaphylaxis support associations in communities across Canada. The CAI’s mission is to prompt the federal government to develop a strategic plan to decrease the risks for Canadians living with anaphylaxis (severe, life-threatening allergies) and to educate the public.

Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative has a 5 point policy request of the federal government.

  1. Federal Coordination – of programs and services dealing with anaphylaxis and food allergy information
  2. Coordinated Awareness Campaigns – both targeted and general public information initiatives
  3. Long Term Commitment to Research – a strategic response and more dollars for research
  4. Improved Allergen Labelling – for foods, drugs, cosmetic and personal care products 
  5. Improved Transportation Safeguards – airline and public transportation policies that reduce risk for food allergic passengers

A detailed backgrounder on the 5 point policy request can be found here:

http://www.nask.ca/files/5-Point%20Policy%20Items%20re%20Motion%20546.pdf

More information about this initiative can be found on the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative Facebook page.

Anaphylaxis Debate in Parliament Monday

       

MP Dean Allison will begin the debate on Motion 546 when Parliament resumes on Monday (March 21 @ 11 a.m.).  The MP’s motion reads: That in the opinion of the House, anaphylaxis is a serious concern for an increasing number of Canadians and the government should take the appropriate measures necessary to ensure these Canadians are able to maintain a high quality of life.

Mr. Allison has worked with Canadian families who are raising awareness of anaphylaxis (severe, life-threatening allergies) amongst MPs and in the Ottawa bureaucracy. His motion is to focus attention on government action that can be taken to reduce risks of for Canadians diagnosed with anaphylaxis and to educate the general public.

The Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative, of which Chris George is a member, applauds MP Dean Allison as he takes this issue to the floor of the House of Commons.  [Photo (l to r): Chris George, Cindy Paskey, Debbie Bruce – all of the CAI – with MP Dean Allison}

BACKGROUND ON THE CAI

Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative is an advocacy effort marshaled by a volunteer group of families from anaphylaxis support associations in communities across Canada. The CAI has a 5 point policy request of the federal government.

  1. Federal Coordination – of programs and services dealing with anaphylaxis and food allergy information
  2. Coordinated Awareness Campaigns – both targeted and general public information initiatives
  3. Long Term Commitment to Research – a strategic response and more dollars for research
  4. Improved Allergen Labelling – for foods, drugs, cosmetic and personal care products 
  5. Improved Transportation Safeguards – airline and public transportation policies that reduce risk for food allergic passengers

More background information about this initiative can be found on Face Book – the Canadian Anaphylaxis Initiative or the NASK website at: http://www.nask.ca/events.html

Top-Ten-Quotes-of-All-Time

      

In December 2005, CG&A COMM published their research on uncovering the most significant quotes through the ages. Here is an annotated list (in no particular order) of the ‘Top-Ten-Quotes-of-All-Time.’ 

 

Do onto others as you would have others do onto you. The Bible – This is known as the ‘Golden Rule’.  It captures the fundamental belief of what we most want from the human condition – to be treated with the same degree of respect that we afford others.

 

Know thyself. Anon. – This ancient Greek quote is an inscription at the temple of Apollo at Delphi. The sage advice is said to be the key to happiness. It is found in ancient scriptures; writings from the middle ages; cited in thoughts of Nietzsche, Schopenhauer and Freud; and, today, it can be found as core advice in many ‘self-help’ works.

 

I think therefore I am. Rene Descartes (1596-1650) – a French mathematician and philosopher.  ‘Cogito ergo sum’ is a profound thought that influenced many thinkers for centuries. For his many works, Descartes is recognized as the ‘The Founder of Modern Philosophy.’

 

Nothing succeeds like success. Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) – a French novelist.  A saying that successful people like to quote – one of Donald Trump’s favourites. It is also often used by sports coaches and commentators. It best sums up the thought that if one experiences success at something, then the next success will be that much easier.

 

Knowledge is power. Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – an English philosopher and scientist. Bacon believed that one should learn and acquire as much knowledge as possible. It’s liberating – powerful. Today, this saying serves as a cornerstone of our information age. With the advent of the Internet and our telecommunications industries – acquiring information and the ability to acquire information is of paramount importance.  

 

The more things change, the more it is the same thing. Alphonse Karr (1808-1890) – a French writer.  This observation is often used to rationalize man’s reoccurring life experiences.  The thought is wrongly attributed to the existentialist J.P. Sarte who slightly altered Karr’s quote to muse: The more things change, the more they stay the same.

 

It is better to have loved and lost, than not to have loved at all. Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 – 1892) – an English novelist.  Consolation for that raw feeling of loved lost. This is a very popular saying for jilted lovers who are trying to rationalize the time spent in a failed relationship.

 

Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Lord Acton (1834 – 1902) – an English historian.  Unbridled power is dangerous and leads to misuse of power. Think of how many times we hear political analysts and pundits comment on a dictatorship or an abuse of power with this quote. Lord Acton’s thought: Power requires checks and balances.

 

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. George Santayana (1863 – 1952) – a Spanish born philosopher and poet, schooled in America and resided in Italy.  Santayana’s thoughts moved many world leaders in the aftermath of the World Wars. He believed people (our leaders included) are not properly instructed in history. We see this quote often employed when a historian or writer wishes to juxtapose a current happening with a historical event.

 

God, give us serenity to accept what cannot be changed; courage to change what should be changed; and wisdom to distinguish the one from the other. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892 – 1971) – an American theologian. Probably best known as the Alcoholic Anonymous creed. It is also used within many spiritual writings. We see it in many pieces dealing with death, particularly untimely deaths of loved ones. It is a powerful saying that has helped many accept the unknown and unacceptable.

 

(ed. – This is a repost, picked as one of our favourite three posts from the earliest of posts on this By George Journal back in 2008.) 

 

This article also appears in the By George Treasury, a collection of the very best materials from the CG&A COMM offices dating into the mid-90’s. In that collection, there are pages and pages of remarkable quotations, classic wordplay, puns and quizzes, editorials, humour and popular feature articles.  You can read more about this book at:

https://www.bygeorgejournal.ca/?page_id=10

 

 

In the news: Anaphylaxis / Food Labelling and Allergens

    

The Niagara Region’s independent, on-line news organ, Niagara At Large, has published Chris George’s article: “Important Allergen Labelling Laws Achieved With Help Of Niagara Families”

 

http://niagaraatlarge.com/

 

The article begins… As a parent of a child with anaphylaxis – coping with severe, life threatening allergies – this February’s St. Valentines Day was especially sweet! My family traveled to Ottawa this week to take part in an important federal government announcement concerning the labelling of allergens on Canadian food products. 

 

Here’s the direct link to this article:

http://niagaraatlarge.com/2011/02/25/important-allergen-labelling-laws-achieved-with-help-of-niagara-families/

 

Other recent news release posts can be found here:

 

“New food labelling regulations good news – underlines efforts to raise anaphylaxis awareness”

http://cgacommunications.com/main/?p=240

 

“New food labelling regulations for allergens welcomed by NASK families”

http://www.nask.ca/events.html

 

Popular Inspirational Quotes

     

Here are “the ten most popular inspirational quotes,” according to the Famous Quotes and Quotations website.

  • Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right. – Henry Ford
  • You see things; and you say ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say ‘Why not? – George Bernard Shaw
  • Within each of us lies the power of our consent to health and sickness, to riches and poverty, to freedom and to slavery. It is we who control these, and not another. – Richard Bach (Illusions)
  • Never look down on anybody unless you’re helping him up. – Jesse Jackson
  • To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song. – Maya Angelou
  • There is no use trying, said Alice; one can’t believe impossible things. I dare say you haven’t had much practice, said the Queen. When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. – Lewis Carroll
  • The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. – George Bernard Shaw
  • The journey is the reward. – Chinese Proverb
  • People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within. – Elizabeth Kubler Ross

SOURCE:

http://www.famous-quotes-and-quotations.com/inspirational-quote.html

 

As regular readers will know, the By George Journal is compiling the greatest inspirational and motivational quotes to publish an e-book later this year.

 

By George has a standing invitation for our readers to send us favourite sayings that inspire and motivate.

 

My Remarks on Food Labelling & Anaphylaxis

    
Here is the text of my remarks at Monday’s Ottawa news conference announcing new food labelling regulations.  

 

I am here today as a parent who deals with anaphylaxis; a volunteer member of NASK (Niagara Anaphylaxis Knowledge and Support group); and, a member of a group of families from local community anaphylaxis groups across Canada who are working with MPs to help raise awareness in Ottawa for issues concerning severe, life-threatening allergies.

 

My son David is anaphylactic. He was diagnosed at 2 years of age with severe allergies to peanuts, some tree nuts, and legumes – beans, peas, lentils, and the whole of the legumes family.  This fact has caused our family to make lifestyle changes that will ensure David has a safe environment to grow up in. Our family is very careful about the food we eat. David is 7 years old today – and for years now he has known not to put anything in his mouth that he is not 100% sure is safe.

 

Shopping for us, at times, is challenging. We read food labels a lot. We are the family that go, aisle to aisle, reading every label before putting the product into our shopping cart. We read the labels a few times in the store – and again at home. David even knows what to look for on the labels. For us, this is habitual. It is also absolutely necessary.

 

We depend on food producers and packagers to label contents correctly. Over the years, labels concerning allergens have been getting better. However, there are still times when the label is unclear and we are unsure. When food contents become a guessing game, our family rule is that we don’t purchase the product. We need to be 100% sure.

 

That is why this announcement today is so important for our family. These new regulations will make our shopping trips a lot less confusing. Clear, consistent, standardized labeling will make shopping a lot easier. When these regulations come into effect, no doubt, our family’s shopping trips will be safer.

 

So, we are pleased to have made the trip from St. Catharines to be here to hear the Minister announce that the Government is moving forward with these important new regulations. Thank you Minister.

 

I also want to thank the 4 Niagara MPs who support NASK, and the almost 40 MPs from all Parties who have worked with our families and expressed their commitment to raising awareness of anaphylaxis on Parliament Hill and within the federal bureaucracy.

 

Thank you to MP Dean Allison for his Motion 546 relating to anaphylaxis. Thank you to Dean and St. Catharines MP Rick Dykstra for your work on this important matter of food labeling. Our family appreciates the work you have done for us – and I know I speak for many families and friends in Niagara who appreciate your efforts.

 

Thank you again, Minister Aglukkaq, for making our day.