Tag Archives: inspirational

A Sunday Retreat with Marcus Aurelius

We all should take time to reflect upon the advice of ancient Roman sage Marcus Aurelius. There is much to learn from his writings Meditations. Of his most important musings is the fact that man’s happiness in, and appreciation for life begins with self knowledge.

These particular excerpts from the earlier books of Meditations are a great launching pad in understanding the teachings of this great counsel.

       Men seek retreats for themselves, houses in the country, sea-shores, and mountains; and thou, too, art wont to desire such things very much. But this altogether a mark of the most common sort of man, for it is in thy power whenever thou shalt choose to retire into thyself. For nowhere either with more quiet or more freedom from trouble does a man retire than into his own soul, particularly when he has within him such thoughts that by looking into them he is immediately in perfect tranquility; and I affirm that tranquility is nothing else than the good ordering of the mind. Constantly then give to thyself this retreat, and renew thyself; and let thy principles be brief and fundamental, which as soon as thou shalt recur to them, will be sufficient to cleanse the soul completely, and to send thee back free from all discontent with the things to which thou returnest.

       This then remains:  Remember to retire into this little territory of thy own, and above all do not distract or strain thyself, but be free, and look at things as a man, as a human being, as a citizen, as a mortal. But among the things readiest to thy hand to which thou shalt turn, let there be these, which are two. One is that things do not touch the soul, for they are external and remain immovable; but our perturbations come only from the opinion which is within. The other is that all things which thou seest change immediately and will no longer be; and constantly bear in mind how many of these changes thou hast already witnessed. The universe is transformation: life is opinion.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Quotes of Affirmation

“Positive anything is better than negative nothing.” – Elbert Hubbard

“We have to do the best we can. This is our sacred human responsibility.” – Albert Einstein

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Wishing is not enough; we must do.” – Johann Von Goethe

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” – Anais Nin

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and then go and do that.” – Harold Whitman

“There is no such thing in anyone’s life as an unimportant day.” – Alexander Woollcott

“The purpose of man is to live, not to exist.” – Jack London

“We change the world not by what we say or do, but as a consequence of what we have become.” – Dr. David Hawkins

“All you have to do is look straight and see the road, and when you see it, don’t sit looking at it – walk.” – Ayn Rand

“Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.” – Thomas Jefferson

“I think in terms of the day’s resolutions, not the year’s.” – Henry Moore

“Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” – Albert Einstein

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” – C.S. Lewis

“Forever is composed of nows.” – Emily Dickenson

“Happiness, not in another place but this place… not for another hour, but this hour.” – Walt Whitman

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

John Maxwell Bons Mots

  • The pessimist complains about the wind. The optimist expects it to change. The leader adjusts the sails.
  • Leadership is not about titles, positions or flowcharts. It is about one life influencing another.
  • You don’t overcome challenges by making them smaller but by making yourself bigger.
  • A difficult time can be more readily endured if we retain the conviction that our existence holds a purpose, a cause to pursue, a person to love, a goal to achieve.
  • “Failing forward” is the ability to get back up after you’ve been knocked down, learn from your mistake, and move forward in a better direction.
  • If you start today to do the right thing, you are already a success even if it doesn’t show yet.
  • The greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one.
  • If we are growing we are always going to be outside our comfort zone.
  • Leaders never outgrow the need to change.
  • Learn to say ‘no’ to the good so you can say ‘yes’ to the best.
  • The more seriously you take your growth, the more seriously your people will take you.
  • Most people have a desire to look for the exception instead of the desire to become exceptional.
  • Although it’s admirable to be ambitious and hard-working, it’s more desirable to be smart-working.
  • You build trust with others each time you choose integrity over image, truth over convenience, or honor over personal gain.
  • The timing of your decision is just as important as the decision you make.
  • A great leader’s courage to fulfill his vision comes from passion, not position.
  • A man must be big enough to admit his mistakes, smart enough to profit from them, and strong enough to correct them.
  • Happiness simply cannot be relied upon as a measure of success.
  • Reaching the top is a monumental achievement, but remaining there may be the most spectacular feat of all.
  • Plan and execute your first failure so that you no longer have to fear it.
  • If you don’t change the direction you are going, then you’re likely to end up where you’re heading…
  • Everything begins with a decision. Then, we have to manage that decision for the rest of your life.
  • It’s true that charisma can make a person stand out for a moment, but character sets a person apart for a lifetime.
  • People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

A Dozen Maxims By John Maxwell

  • Speak the truth. Transparency breeds legitimacy.
  • People may hear your words, but they feel your attitude.
  • Change is inevitable. Growth is optional.
  • The only guarantee for failure is to stop trying.
  • Talent is a gift, but character is a choice.
  • Life is 10% of what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it.
  • We cannot become what we need by remaining what we are.
  • Doing the right thing daily, compounds over time.
  • Growth inside fuels growth outside.
  • People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.
  • To add value to others, one must first value others.
  • You cannot overestimate the unimportance of practically everything.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Writers on Life (more memes)

To pass along these remarkable memes, right click on the images and copy/save – and then share widely.

To regularly receive these bons mots, follow By George on Facebook and Twitter.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Writers on Life (10 memes)

 

To pass along these remarkable memes, right click on the images and copy/save – and then share widely.

To regularly receive these bons mots, follow By George on Facebook and Twitter.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

On the Meaning and Wonder of Life

  • Life has no meaning the moment you lose the illusion of being eternal. – Jean-Paul Sarte
  • This is it. There are no hidden meanings. All that mystical stuff is just what’s so. – Werner Erhard
  • The search is what anyone would undertake if he were not sunk in the everydayness of his own life. To become aware of the possibility of the search is to be onto something. Not to be onto something is to be in despair. – Walker Percy
  • The mountains, rivers, earth, grasses, trees, and forests are always emanating a subtle, precious light, day and night, always emanating a subtle, precious sound, demonstrating and expounding to all people the unsurpassed ultimate truth. – Yuan-sou
  • In my hut this spring, there is nothing — there is everything! – Sodo
  • The world is not to be put in order, the world is order incarnate. It is for us to put ourselves in unison with this order. – Henry Miller
  • I am a part of all that I have met. – Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • Darkness within darkness. The gateway to all understanding. – Tao Te Ching
  • Perhaps the truth depends on a walk around the lake. – Wallace Stevens
  • How could drops of water know themselves to be a river? Yet the river flows on. – Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  • Hide your body in the Big Dipper. – Zen saying
  • Being is. Being is in-itself. Being is what it is. – Jean-Paul Sarte

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top 3 Facebook posts of 2018

This week, By George counted down the top 10 posts to be highlighted in 2018 on the By George Facebook Page. Here are the top three selected from last year:

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The #1 By George Facebook post of 2018…

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Friedrich Nietzsche (memes to wake the soul)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To pass along these remarkable insights of Nietzsche, right click on the images and copy/save – and then share widely.  To receive similar, profound memes on a regular basis, follow By George on Facebook and Twitter.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Wisdom of Winston Churchill (6 FAV memes)

Here are 6 brilliant sayings by Sir Winston Churchill which have been made into attractive memes (ready for you to right-click-copy-and-paste into your presentation).

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

On Gratitude

The Pilgrims made seven times more graves than huts. No Americans have been more impoverished than these who, nevertheless, set aside a day of thanksgiving. – H.U. Westermayer

Not what we say about our blessings, but how we use them, is the true measure of our thanksgiving. – WT Purkiser

So while it’s true that Thanksgiving only comes but once a year, we should actually celebrate thanks each and every day. It’s just a matter of learning to live with a spirit of gratitude. – Unknown

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity.  It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.  Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow. – Melody Beattie

On Thanksgiving Day we acknowledge our dependence. – William Jennings Bryan

Greed grabs, Gratitude receives. – Unknown

Happiness cannot be traveled to, owned, earned, worn or consumed.  Happiness is the spiritual experience of living every minute with love, grace, and gratitude. – D. Waitley

Thankfulness is the ‘chief exercise of godliness’ in which we ought to engage during the whole of our life. ‘Gratitude is the heart … of the Christian life.’ – Unknown

Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings. – William Arthur Ward

How wonderful it would be if we could help our children and grandchildren to learn thanksgiving at an early age. Thanksgiving opens the doors. It changes a child’s personality. A child is resentful, negative, or thankful. Thankful children want to give, they radiate happiness, they draw people. – Sir John Templeton

Gratitude is a constant attitude of thankfulness and appreciation for life as it unfolds.  Living in the moment, we are open to the abundance around us and within us.  We express appreciation freely.  We contemplate the richness of our life.  In life’s trials, we seek to understand, to accept, to learn. Gratitude is a continual celebration of life. – Unknown

Gratitude is a vaccine, an antitoxin, and an antiseptic.’ This is a most searching and true diagnosis. Gratitude can be a vaccine that can prevent the invasion of a disgruntled attitude. As antitoxins prevent the disastrous effects of certain poisons and diseases, thanksgiving destroys the poison of fault-finding and grumbling. When trouble has smitten us, a spirit of thanksgiving is a soothing antiseptic.- John Henry Jowett

Thanksgiving Day is a jewel, to set in the hearts of honest men; but be careful that you do not take the day, and leave out the gratitude. – E.P. Powell

I am grateful for what I am and have. My thanksgiving is perpetual. – Henry David Thoreau

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

A life lesson at home plate

This is making the rounds – a great story with a remarkable life lesson.

 

In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.  While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”  Who the hell is John Scolinos, I wondered. No matter, I was just happy to be there.

In 1996, Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948. He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate.  Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally … “You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility. “No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.
“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth’s time? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”
Another long pause.
“Seventeen inches?” came a guess from another reluctant coach.
“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”
“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.
“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”
“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.
“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”
“Seventeen inches!”
“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide home plate is in the Major Leagues?”
“Seventeen inches!”
“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls. “And what do they do with a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Jimmy. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of hitting it. If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”
Pause.
“Coaches …”
Pause.
” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? When our team rules forbid facial hair and a guy shows up unshaven? What if he gets caught drinking? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him, do we widen home plate?”

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold. He turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!”
Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.
“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful, and to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?” Silence. He replaced the flag with a Cross.
“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …” With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.  “… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.

 

(ed. – Thank you to Dick Inwood and Claude Bennett who forwarded this poignant story to us.)

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Some of Muhammad Ali’s greatest quotes

ali_1992By George has compiled some of our favourite quotes from the life of Muhammad Ali – “The Greatest of All-time.”

 

“I am an ordinary man who worked hard to develop the talent I was given. I believed in myself, and I believe in the goodness of others.”

 

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.”

 

“It’s lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believed in myself.”

 

“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

 

“The man who has no imagination has no wings.”

 

“Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on earth.”

 

“A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life.”

 

“Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams – they all have different names, but they all contain water. Just as religions do – they all contain truths.”

 

“It isn’t the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it’s the pebble in your shoe.”

 

“The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses – behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights.”

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“I hated every minute of training, but I said, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.”

 

“He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life.”

 

“Silence is golden when you can’t think of a good answer.”

 

ali_foreman“Only a man who knows what it is like to be defeated can reach down to the bottom of his soul and come up with the extra ounce of power it takes to win when the match is even.”

 

“I never thought of losing, but now that it’ s happened, the only thing is to do it right. That’s my obligation to all the people who believe in me. We all have to take defeats in life.”

 

“I wish people would love everybody else the way they love me. It would be a better world.”

 

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Here are a few golden quips about the ring and Ali’s mastery of talking trash.

“Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. His hands can’t hit what his eyes can’t see. Now you see me, now you don’t. George thinks he will, but I know he won’t.”

 

“I’m the greatest thing that ever lived! I’m the king of the world! I’m a bad man. I’m the prettiest thing that ever lived.”

 

“I am the greatest. I said that even before I knew I was.”

 

“It’s just a job. Grass grows, birds fly, waves pound the sand. I beat people up.”

 

“I done wrestled with an alligator, I done tussled with a whale; handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder in jail; only last week, I murdered a rock, injured a stone, hospitalised a brick; I’m so mean I make medicine sick.”

 

“If you even dream of beating me you’d better wake up and apologize.”

 

“I’m so fast that last night I turned off the light switch in my hotel room and was in bed before the room was dark.”

 

“I am the astronaut of boxing. Joe Louis and Dempsey were just jet pilots. I’m in a world of my own.”

 

“I used to tease Joe Louis by reminding him that I was the greatest of all time. But Joe Louis was the greatest heavyweight fighter ever.”

 

“People don’t realize what they had till it’s gone. Like President Kennedy, there was no one like him, the Beatles, and my man Elvis Presley. I was the Elvis of boxing.”

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

12 Habits Of Genuine People

How genuine are you? Here is a list of character traits that Travis Bradberry (author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0 and principle at www.TalentSmart.com) has compiled that will provide you with a measuring stick of your moral fiber as it pertains to genuineness.

Consider the hallmarks of genuine people.

  1. Genuine people don’t try to make people like them. They are who they are. They know that some people will like them, and some won’t. And they’re OK with that. It’s not that they don’t care whether or not other people will like them but simply that they’re not going to let that get in the way of doing the right thing. They’re willing to make unpopular decisions and to take unpopular positions if that’s what needs to be done.
  2. They don’t pass judgment. Genuine people are open-minded, which makes them approachable and interesting to others.
  3. They forge their own paths. Genuine people don’t derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from the opinions of others. Their direction comes from within, from their own principles and values. They do what they believe to be the right thing, and they’re not swayed by the fact that somebody might not like it.
  4. They are generous. Genuine people are unfailingly generous with whom they know, what they know, and the resources they have access to. They want you to do well more than anything else because they’re team players and they’re confident enough to never worry that your success might make them look bad.
  5. They treat everyone with respect. Genuine people are unfailingly polite and respectful. They believe they’re no better than anyone else.
  6. They aren’t motivated by material things. Genuine people don’t need shiny, fancy stuff in order to feel good. Their happiness comes from within, as well as from the simpler pleasures—such as friends, family, and a sense of purpose—that make life rich.
  7. They are trustworthy. People gravitate toward those who are genuine because they know they can trust them. Genuine people mean what they say, and if they make a commitment, they keep it.
  8. They are thick-skinned. Genuine people have a strong enough sense of self that they don’t go around seeing offense that isn’t there. They’re able to objectively evaluate negative and constructive feedback, accept what works, put it into practice, and leave the rest of it behind without developing hard feelings.
  9. They put away their phones. When genuine people commit to a conversation, they focus all of their energy on the conversation. Genuine people create connection and find depth even in short, everyday conversations.
  10. They aren’t driven by ego. Genuine people don’t make decisions based on their egos because they don’t need the admiration of others in order to feel good about themselves. Likewise, they don’t seek the limelight or try to take credit for other people’s accomplishments.
  11. They aren’t hypocrites. Genuine people practice what they preach. And genuine people fix their own problems first.
  12. They don’t brag. Genuine people don’t need to brag. They’re confident in their accomplishments, but they also realize that when you truly do something that matters, it stands on its own merits, regardless of how many people notice or appreciate it.

In summary, genuine people know who they are. They are confident enough to be comfortable in their own skin. They are firmly grounded in reality, and they’re truly present in each moment because they’re not trying to figure out someone else’s agenda or worrying about their own.

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(SOURCE – Read the full article in Forbes Magazine: 12 Habits of Genuine People)

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Marcus Tullius Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (English byname Tully) was born in 106 BC in where is now Arpino, Italy. He was a Roman statesman, lawyer, scholar, and writer who vainly tried to uphold republican principles in the final civil wars that destroyed the Roman Republic. His writings include books of rhetoric, orations, philosophical and political treatises, and letters. Above all, he considered politics of utmost importance, which should be effectively influenced by philosophy. He is remembered in modern times as the greatest Roman orator and innovator of what became known as Ciceronian rhetoric. Marcus Tullius Cicero was murdered by decree as an enemy of the state in 43 BC. Here is a favourite observation that should be committed to memory:

“Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.”

Here are some more of our favourite Tully musings:

  • “Our span of life is brief, but is long enough for us to live well and honestly.”
  • “If we are not ashamed to think it, we should not be ashamed to say it.”
  • “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.”
  • “Dum Spiro, spero.” – “As long as I breathe, I hope.”
  • “The life given us, by nature is short; but the memory of a well-spent life is eternal.”
  • “Politicians are not born; they are excreted.”
  • “Non nobis solum nati sumus.” – “We are not born for ourselves alone.”
  • “A happy life consists in tranquility of mind.”
  • “It is not by muscle, speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgment.”
  • “What an ugly beast is the ape, and how like us.”

And Marcus Tullius Cicero is also known for his love of books and reading. On this subject he espoused:

  • “Read at every wait; read at all hours; read within leisure; read in times of labor; read as one goes in; read as one goest out. The task of the educated mind is simply put: read to lead.”
  • “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”
  • “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”
  • “For books are more than books, they are the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the reason why men worked and died, the essence and quintessence of their lives.”

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.