Tag Archives: writing

10 FAV quotes on writing

  1. Easy reading is damn hard writing.  — Nathaniel Hawthorne
  2. Good writers define reality; bad ones merely restate it. A good writer turns fact into truth; a bad writer will, more often than not, accomplish the opposite. – Edward Albee
  3. The sovereign rule:  don’t say it, write it. — James Michener
  4. I think all writing is a disease. You can’t stop it. — William Carlos Williams
  5. I keep going over a sentence. I nag it, gnaw it, pat and flatter it. – Janet Flanner
  6. Without words, without writing and without books there would be no history, there could be no concept of humanity. – Hermann Hesse
  7. The difference between the right word and almost the right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug.  — Mark Twain
  8. There’s a great power in words, if you don’t hitch too many of them together. – Josh Billings
  9. Only a mediocre writer is always at his best. – W. Somerset Maugham
  10. A writer is somebody for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people. – Thomas Mann

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Quotes for writers on writing

“Almost all good writing begins with terrible first efforts. You need to start somewhere.” – Anne Lamott

“Bad things don’t happen to writers; it’s all material.” – Garrison Keillor

“You can fix anything but a blank page.” – Nora Roberts

“Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.” – Stephen King

“Writing well means never having to say, ‘I guess you had to be there.’” – Jef Mallett

“Find your niche, and then go even more niche.” – Joe Pulizzi

“When I sit down to write, I don’t think about writing about an idea or a given message. I just try to write a story which is hard enough.” – Jhumpa Lahiri

“Don’t wait for moods. You accomplish nothing if you do that. Your mind must know it has got to get down to work.” – Pearl S. Buck

“Why waste a sentence saying nothing?” – Seth Godin

“A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.” – Richard Bach

“Exercise the writing muscle every day, even if it is only a letter, notes, a title list, a character sketch, a journal entry. Writers are like dancers, like athletes. Without that exercise, the muscles seize up.” – Jane Yolen

“Don’t try to figure out what other people want to hear from you; figure out what you have to say. It’s the one and only thing you have to offer.” – Barbara Kingsolver

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Our e-bookshelf

e-book_1Check out our e-bookshelf for the seven e-books available as PDF files for your reading enjoyment. Visit our e-bookshelf to get your By George writing today.

 

By George Journal E-bookshelf

 

We offer on-line payment through PayPal. (Once your order is complete, you will receive an e-mail containing your e-book.) For less than the price of your Starbucks morning coffee, you can pull from the By George e-bookshelf:

Becoming Better Communicators

Keep Them Laughing

1001 Quotes on Politics, Elections, Democracy and Government

Our 1000 FAV Quotes

A Day in the Life of Man – Sustenance for the Soul

The By George Treasury

By George Treasury II

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Chris George’s 3 Simple Rules for Writers

  1. img_1978newJust do it – write. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down. And, if it’s not the right word, put it down anyways (you can always edit later).
  2. Put your writing away for a night, a whole day, a week (whatever it takes) and then re-read it like you are reading it for the first time. Let your trusted friends read it. Fix what doesn’t read well. Read it one more time, edit and accept it – and then move on (you’ve got more to write!).
  3. Always finish what you are writing. Like a campfire, when you have come to an end of a piece, extinguish your thoughts and feelings and don’t leave anything to smolder. In this way, you’ll have peace of mind to pack up and leave for your next writing adventure.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top-10 Words about Nonsense

Here’s another great top-10 list. Admittedly, it’s codswallop.

However, you will recognize some of the words – and you may just use a few of them.

  1. Buffoonery / foolish or playful behavior or practice
  2. Codswallop / words or language having no meaning or conveying no intelligible ideas; drivel
  3. Bosh / foolish talk or activity; nonsense – often used interjectionally
  4. Tomfoolery / playful or foolish behavior
  5. Bunkum / insincere or foolish talk; claptrap
  6. Blatherskite / voluble nonsensical or inconsequential talk or writing; blather
  7. Flapdoodle / foolish, empty, and often specious talk, writing, ideas, or opinions
  8. Balderdash / nonsense; empty talk
  9. Monkeyshines / pranks; mischievous or questionable tricks or pranks; monkey business
  10. Folderol / nonsensical talk or action; trivial nonsense

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SOURCE: The Merriam Webster Dictionary

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Creative Thinking is Work

     Creative thinking is work. You must have passion and the determination to immerse yourself in the process of creating new and different ideas. Then you must have patience to persevere against all adversity.

     All creative geniuses work passionately hard and produce incredible numbers of ideas, most of which are bad. In fact, more bad poems were written by the major poets than by minor poets.

     Thomas Edison created 3000 different ideas for lighting systems before he evaluated them for practicality and profitability.

     Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart produced more than six hundred pieces of music, including forty-one symphonies and some forty-odd operas and masses, during his short creative life.

     Rembrandt produced around 650 paintings and 2,000 drawings and Picasso executed more than 20,000 works.

    Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets. Some were masterpieces, while others were no better than his contemporaries could have written, and some were simply bad.

This is an excerpt from an article written by Michael Michalko, author of Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative Thinking Techniques and Creative thinking: Putting your Imagination to Work.  It first appeared in Psychology Today and has reappeared in many forms on the Internet. To read the full article, “Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking” click here.

More on Michael Michalko’s books, read here.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Monday morning thought on “Creativity”

Creativity is paradoxical. To create, a person must have knowledge but forget the knowledge, must see unexpected connections in things but not have a mental disorder, must work hard but spend time doing nothing as information incubates, must create many ideas yet most of them are useless, must look at the same thing as everyone else, yet see something different, must desire success but embrace failure, must be persistent but not stubborn, and must listen to experts but know how to disregard them.

This reflection of creativity is from Michael Michalko, author of Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative Thinking Techniques and Creative thinking: Putting your Imagination to Work.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Benjamin Franklin on improving thinking and writing

benfranklinAs we dig into our post-Labour Day realities, the scribes at CG&A COMM thought it best to review some advice from Benjamin Franklin – a very productive and prolific man. Here is this American genius on how to improve your own thinking and writing skills. Benjamin Franklin writes in his autobiography how he used news copy of current affairs:

About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator. … I thought the writing excellent and wished if possible to imitate it. With that view, I took some of the papers, and making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then without looking at the book, tried to complete the papers again by expressing each hinted sentiment at length and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should occur to me. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them. … I also sometimes jumbled my collections of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavoured to reduce them into the best order before I began to form the full sentences and complete the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of the thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I discovered many faults and corrected them; but I sometimes had the pleasure of fancying that in certain particulars of small import I had been lucky enough to improve the method or the language, and this encourage me to think that I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Oscar Wilde on artistry

  • I’ve put my genius into my life; I’ve only put my talent into my works.
  • A book or poem which has no pity in it had better not be written.
  • There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written.
  • Good artists exist simply in what they make, and consequently are perfectly uninteresting in what they are.
  • When critics disagree, the artist is in accord with himself.
  • The play was a great success, but the audience was a disaster.
  • The suspense is terrible. I hope it will last.
  • This morning I took out a comma and this afternoon I put it back again.
  • The public is wonderfully tolerant. It forgives everything except genius.
  • The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable, and literature is not read.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

“The write stuff”

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Whether you need your brand promoted, an issue positioned, key messages polished, or interests advanced, we will provide you with “the write stuff.”

 

We offer an experienced and insightful writing service that produces effective copy to profile, raise awareness and build engagement for businesses, organizations, interest groups and individuals. Chris George leads a team of wordsmiths and public relations specialists who will provide:

  • A talented braintrust to write or copy-edit, and the experience to offer a second opinion or fresh perspective.
  • Reliable counsel and services that will produce clear and creative copy on deadline and on budget.
  • SM & PR strategies with engaging copy and tactical advice for social media feeds and in traditional media channels.

 

Our Writing Services

  • Persuasive PR content and wordsmith services to advance issues, enhance reputations, and to profile and position within the media, public or key stakeholders.
  • Ghostwriting and editing services to support an organization’s or corporate executive team, including writing for social media, presentations, internal memos and documents, correspondence, etc.
  • Social media content services to develop, implement and/or manage a social media strategy.

 

Our virtual assistants will provide executive services that can take care of all your communications and writing needs.

  • Writing
  • press releases & media backgrounders
  • brochures, newsletters, annual reports
  • internal memos & communiques
  • business letters & correspondence

 

  • Editing and Proofreading

 

  • Social Media Content (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.)

 

  • Blog Posts
  • writing & copy-editing
  • research

 

  • PowerPoint Presentations

 

  • Internet Research

 

  • Media Monitoring

 

Use our Communications Concierge Service as you need it!

 

This is the easy, convenient way to ensure you have access to a wordsmith or communications specialists when you need them.

 

With Chris, you’re hiring an experienced communications aide, a can-do scribe and idea guy to be by your side. A Virtual Assistant will make you sound and look good!  Our service will relieve you of stressful frustration and anxiety over those looming deadlines. Your Virtual Assistant will save you time – and provide that extra to get the results you need.

 

Connect with us to learn more.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Writers on “Words”

  • Words are the physicians of a mind diseased. – Aeschylus
  • Like stones, words are laborious and unforgiving, and the fitting of them together, like the fitting of stones, demands great patience and strength of purpose and particular skill. – Edmund Morrison
  • Proper words in proper places, make the true definition of a style. – Jonathan Swift
  • The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug. – Mark Twain
  • A language is a dialect with its own army and navy. – Max Weinreich
  • Some words are like the old Roman galleys; large-scaled and ponderous. They sit low in the water even when their cargo is light – William Jovanovich
  • Slang is language which takes off its coat, spits on its hands – and goes to work. – Carl Sandburg
  • In certain trying circumstances, urgent circumstances, desperate circumstances, profanity furnishes a relief denied even to prayer. – Mark Twain
  • I wonder what language truck drivers are using, now that everyone is using theirs? – Beryl Pfizer
  • Footnotes, the little dogs yapping at the heels of the text. – William James
  • A good catchword can obscure analysis for fifty years. – Johan Huisinga
  • Words once spoken, can never be recalled. – Wentworth Dillon
  • The word is half his that speaks, and half his that hears it. – Montaigne
  • “When I say a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean – neither more nor less.” / “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” / “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master – that’s all.” – Lewis Carroll
  • Often I am struck in amazement about a word. I suddenly realize that the complete arbitrariness of our language is but a part of the arbitrariness of our own world in general. – Christian Morgenstern

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Ernest Hemingway on effective writing

I couldn’t refer to authors’ rules on effective writing without mentioning my favourite writer and his perspective on what makes great writing. Ernest Hemingway wrote a lot about writing.

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Here’s a few rules from the Master on what it takes to write well.

  1. Use short sentences and short first paragraphs.
  2. Use vigorous English – passion, focus and intention.
  3. Be positive, not negative.
  4. Spend time to edit and rewrite. (“I write one page of masterpiece to ninety-one pages of shit,” Hemingway confided to F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1934. “I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.”)

 

Joanna Young of the blog The Confident Writing Coach catalogued 27 gems from Hemingway on the art of writing.

Here Is Young’s list of Hemingway’s advice to writers:

1 Start with the simplest things

2 Boil it down

3 Know what to leave out

4 Write the tip of the ice-berg, leave the rest under the water

5 Watch what happens today

6 Write what you see

7 Listen completely

8 Write when there is something you know, and not before

9 Look at words as if seeing them for the first time

10 Use the most conventional punctuation you can

11 Ditch the dictionary

12 Distrust adjectives

13 Learn to write a simple declarative sentence

14 Tell a story in six words

15 Write poetry into prose

16 Read everything so you know what you need to beat

17 Don’t try to beat Shakespeare

18 Accept that writing is something you can never do as well as it can be done

19 Go fishing in summer

20 Don’t drink when you’re writing

21 Finish what you start

22 Don’t worry. You’ve written before and you will write again

23 Forget posterity. Think only of writing truly

24 Write as well as you can with no eye on the market

25 Write clearly – and people will know if you are being true

26 Just write the truest sentence that you know

27 Remember that nobody really knows or understands the secret

 

Joanna Young’s blog entry is here:

http://confidentwriting.com/2008/02/27-secrets-to-w/

 

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

 

 

Kurt Vonnegut Jr. on writing

Here’s a fabulous American writer – Kurt Vonnegut – on his art form of writing.

 

  1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
  2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
  3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
  4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.*
  5. Start as close to the end as possible.
  6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
  7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
  8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Mark Twain’s thoughts on quality writing

bg164In a letter to D. W. Bowser, in 1880, Mark Twain described what he saw as quality writing:

 

     I notice that you use plain, simple language, short words and brief sentences. That is the way to write English – it is the modern way and the best way. Stick to it; don’t let fluff and flowers and verbosity creep in. When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don’t mean utterly, but kill most of them – then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit, once fastened upon a person, is as hard to get rid of as any other vice.

 

Here are some of this great master’s musings on the art of writing.

 

  • We write frankly and fearlessly but then we “modify” before we print. – Life on the Mississippi

 

  • It is no use to keep private information which you can’t show off. – “An Author’s Soldiering,” 1887

 

  • I conceive that the right way to write a story for boys is to write so that it will not only interest boys but strongly interest any man who has ever been a boy. That immensely enlarges the audience. – Letter to Fred J. Hall, 10 Aug 1892

 

  • Experience of life (not of books) is the only capital usable in such a book as you have attempted; one can make no judicious use of this capital while it is new. – letter to Bruce Weston Munro, 21 Oct 1881 (Karanovich collection)

 

  • To get the right word in the right place is a rare achievement. To condense the diffused light of a page of thought into the luminous flash of a single sentence, is worthy to rank as a prize composition just by itself…Anybody can have ideas–the difficulty is to express them without squandering a quire of paper on an idea that ought to be reduced to one glittering paragraph. – Letter to Emeline Beach, 10 Feb 1868

 

  • The time to begin writing an article is when you have finished it to your satisfaction. By that time you begin to clearly and logically perceive what it is that you really want to say. – Mark Twain’s Notebook, 1902-1903

 

  • You need not expect to get your book right the first time. Go to work and revamp or rewrite it. God only exhibits his thunder and lightning at intervals, and so they always command attention. These are God’s adjectives. You thunder and lightning too much; the reader ceases to get under the bed, by and by. – Letter to Orion Clemens, 23 March 1878

 

  • I wrote the rest of The Innocents Abroad in sixty days and I could have added a fortnight’s labor with the pen and gotten along without the letters altogether. I was very young in those days, exceedingly young, marvelously young, younger than I am now, younger than I shall ever be again, by hundreds of years. I worked every night from eleven or twelve until broad daylight in the morning, and as I did 200,000 words in the sixty days, the average was more than 3,000 words a day- nothing for Sir Walter Scott, nothing for Louis Stevenson, nothing for plenty of other people, but quite handsome for me. In 1897, when we were living in Tedworth Square, London, and I was writing the book called Following the Equator, my average was 1,800 words a day; here in Florence (1904) my average seems to be 1,400 words per sitting of four or five hours. – Autobiography of Mark Twain

 

  • Well, my book is written–let it go. But if it were only to write over again there wouldn’t be so many things left out. They burn in me; and they keep multiplying; but now they can’t ever be said. And besides, they would require a library–and a pen warmed up in hell. – Letter to W. D. Howells, 22 Sept 1889 (referring to A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court)

 

  • Let us guess that whenever we read a sentence & like it, we unconsciously store it away in our model-chamber; & it goes, with the myriad of its fellows, to the building, brick by brick, of the eventual edifice which we call our style. – Letter to George Bainton, 15 Oct 1888

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Twain’s Rules of Writing

twain2Here are great rules for quality writing by America’s renown author Mark Twain. The rules are taken from Twain’s scathing essay on the “Literary Offenses of James Fenimore Cooper.”

 

  1. A tale shall accomplish something and arrive somewhere.

 

  1. The episodes of a tale shall be necessary parts of the tale, and shall help develop it.

 

  1. The personages in a tale shall be alive, except in the case of corpses, and that always the reader shall be able to tell the corpses from the others.

 

  1. The personages in a tale, both dead and alive, shall exhibit a sufficient excuse for being there.

 

  1. When the personages of a tale deal in conversation, the talk shall sound like human talk, and be talk such as human beings would be likely to talk in the given circumstances, and have a discoverable meaning, also a discoverable purpose, and a show of relevancy, and remain in the neighborhood of the subject in hand, and be interesting to the reader, and help out the tale, and stop when the people cannot think of anything more to say.

 

  1. When the author describes the character of a personage in his tale, the conduct and conversation of that personage shall justify said description.

 

  1. When a personage talks like an illustrated, gilt-edged, tree-calf, hand-tooled, seven-dollar Friendship’s Offering in the beginning of a paragraph, he shall not talk like a Negro minstrel at the end of it.

 

  1. Crass stupidities shall not be played upon the reader by either the author or the people in the tale.

 

  1. The personages of a tale shall confine themselves to possibilities and let miracles alone; or, if they venture a miracle, the author must so plausibly set it forth as to make it look possible and reasonable.

 

  1. The author shall make the reader feel a deep interest in the personages of his tale and their fate; and that he shall make the reader love the good people in the tale and hate the bad ones.

 

  1. The characters in tale be so clearly defined that the reader can tell beforehand what each will do in a given emergency.

 

An author should:

 

  1. Say what he is proposing to say, not merely come near it.

 

  1. Use the right word, not its second cousin.

 

  1. Eschew surplusage.

 

  1. Not omit necessary details.

 

  1. Avoid slovenliness of form.

 

  1. Use good grammar.

 

  1. Employ a simple, straightforward style.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Read the E-mail Charter

Computer Monitors Shaking HandsEveryone should read (and share) the E-mail Charter.

 

Here are the 10 rules – and click on the link below to take you to a very thoughtful explanation of each of the points.

 

  1. Respect Recipients’ Time
  2. Short or Slow is not Rude
  3. Celebrate Clarity
  4. Quash Open-Ended Questions
  5. Slash Surplus cc’s
  6. Tighten the Thread
  7. Attack Attachments
  8. Give these Gifts:  EOM  NNTR
  9. Cut Contentless Responses
  10. Disconnect!

 

Click here to read the E-mail Charter in its entirety.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

How are my e-mails received?

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Your e-mails matter. So, before you hit “Send” on your next missive, consider this interesting study.

 

Chelsea Rae De Jonge and Frank McAndrew, a professor of psychology at Knox College in Illinois co-authored a study published in Social Psychological & Personality Science, that looks at three elements of e-mail that shape how others perceive us.  The three elements examined are: first person versus third person, typographical errors, and punctuation.

 

When this study was first published in 2010, the Montreal Gazette interviewed the authors and the professors summarized their findings by saying:

 

“Very subtle little things you might not think about when writing an email -like the kind of punctuation you use, for example -actually have an effect on the people reading that message. If you’re emailing a friend, they’re not going to change their opinion of you based on how the message is put together. But for first impressions, we find these three elements really matter.”

 

The study findings include:

  • Emails written in the third person conveyed a sense of formality that caused study participants to believe the message had come from someone in a supervisory position. It also saw readers presume the sender was angry, as opposed to the perceived intimacy of first-person emails.
  • Emails riddled with errors gave readers the impression that the sender was apathetic. This is so particularly with an older demographic that, unlike younger people did not grow up with text-messaging. Older people make stronger judgments about the intellect of the person sending the message id they see typographical and grammatical errors.
  • Punctuation proved highly influential in moulding people’s opinions. E-mails with no question marks or exclamation points were perceived as being sent by a superior, while those that included lots of question marks and exclamation points were interpreted as coming from a subordinate. In general, question marks conveyed anger and confusion, while exclamation points, as you might expect, communicated happiness. The absence of both types of punctuation implied apathy, and a high frequency of such punctuation caused readers to assume the sender was female.

 

So, before you hit “Send”, reread what you have written and correct your typos and grammar errors!

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

We believe the power of words is a magnificent thing

CG&A_LOGO[1]At CG&A COMM, Content is (Still) King

The power of words is a magnificent thing. Out of profound respect of language, the wordsmiths at CG&A COMMUNICATIONS ply their copy-writing skills to craft content that makes an impression and moves people.

In a press interview from a few years ago, company president (and By George Journal editor) Chris George was quoted to explain a strategic approach to writing and content development. “With the explosion of social media in our business and personal space, the PR adage of ‘Content is King’ is increasingly significant for all of us. Anyone with something to say and wanting to be heard must confront the hurricane of images and words that are continuously blasted at us. To get noticed over this maelstrom, you need quality content that is engaging and persuasive.”

“While it’s a fact that it’s never been easier to express yourself, it’s never been harder to be heard, understood, and appreciated,” George observed.

The attention to detail and to crafting core messages has always set CG&A COMMUNICATIONS writing services and advocacy work apart from other PR/GR services. The difference? The scribes within the CG&A network are wordsmiths and advocates first and foremost: from traditional writing of press releases and speeches, brochure copy and documents; to developing social media content with digital press releases and copy for blogs, Facebook and Twitter pages.

CG&A writing has been described as “persuasive”, “engaging”, and “informative.” The company’s services have been described as “reliable”, “empowering”, and “a God-send.”

George says, “One of our favourite quotes is a Ralph Waldo Emerson observation, “To be understood is a luxury.” We suggest organizations connect with our braintrust and let us provide them with that luxury.”

CG&A is providing “the write stuff” with its Communications Concierge Service (a Virtual Assistant who is your personal go-to scribe) and its Communications Tune-up offering.

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

What makes for an exceptional writer?

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Recently I was asked about the skill set required for writing and what makes for an exceptional writer. In the engrossing discussion that ensued a distinction was made between “writers” and “wordsmiths.”  For the purposes of dissecting this subject matter, the distinction could best be characterized as the line between writing for oneself as a personal pursuit and reflection and wordsmithing for/with someone else for a pay cheque.

 

Here are the key questions and answers from that exchange….

 

Q: What are the primary skills needed to be an excellent writer?

A:  To be an excellent writer, one needs:

  • a healthy mix of creativity and perceptiveness to capture and record the truths of our world in words
  • a masterful command of words:  possessing a good vocabulary and the sense to use the right word for the right reasons
  • the perseverance to revise and rewrite works until they are as they should be

 

Q:  What are the skills needed to be an excellent wordsmith (def’n: one who creates or re-drafts materials for commercial purposes)?

A: To be an excellent wordsmith, one needs:

  • a superior ability to frame ideas and issues in powerful and precise words
  • the nerve of a hard-nosed editor, who will focus on the appropriate style, proper grammar, use of language and words, and the necessary word counts
  • to be part- collaborator, part-facilitator to work with others and accommodate, reason and synthesize all input – and still produce a meaningful, effective piece

 

As both writers and wordsmiths at our firm, we find this type of discussion most intriguing for it cuts to the very core of what we do. It is also the essence of what is describes in our tag line, when we say we are “providing the write stuff.”

 

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Ever wonder what we do?

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Ever wonder what we do? How we help our clients? What is it that we do all day at CG&A COMMUNICATIONS?

Much of our day we’ll spend staring into a screen, with fingers effortlessly tapping the keyboard in the pursuit of the next perfect sentence or provocative image. It’s a day of creativity and an attention to details. Our goal is always to develop effective, evocative communications that achieve the desired results.

Whether you are mounting a PR campaign for your organization, need to win over a particular audience with your idea, or wish to leave a great impression at your up-coming meeting, your success will depend directly on the clarity of your thought and the persuasiveness of your presentation.

Providing clarity and effective advocacy is precisely the invaluable support CG&A COMMUNICATIONS can provide. To use a Canadian analogy: we’ll pack killer snowballs so you can toss ‘em.

We provide the communications support required to be successful in advancing your cause. We have a disciplined approach to our PR and issue management initiatives that has come with decades worth of public and government relations experience. At the core of everything we do is quality writing, copy-editing and content development.

Some communications consultants will shroud their work in a mystic creative process. As results-oriented communicators, we prefer to talk about our systematic approach to meeting defined objectives. Our discipline in achieving results is a stepped process:

  • Set clear objectives and plan of approach
  • Craft persuasive arguments and well developed materials
  • Plan a systematic implementation – eye to detail and info gathering
  • Execute consistent follow-through and persistent follow-up
  • Review and analyze results to develop next steps

To describe our approach in another way, you might say we’re part-chief-investigator-part-dream-weaver. I personally like to think of myself as an “amiable gadfly and seeker-of-all-things-that-can-make-a-good-story.” However, that title would likely raise more questions than it answers around a boardroom table… so, I will stick with the rather conservative albeit clumsy: PR/GR advocate, writer, copy-editor & content developer.

To read more background on myself and the company, here are a few interesting links:

About Chris George

The CG&A COMMUNICATIONS website

About our services

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a trusted executive assistant, a communications can-do guy, or a go-to-scribe? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.