Tag Archives: leadership

George Washington bons mots

  • Adhere to your purpose and you will soon feel as well as you ever did. On the contrary, if you falter, and give up, you will lose the power of keeping any resolution, and will regret it all your life.
  • Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire, called conscience.
  • It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.
  • I walk slowly, but I never walk backward.
  • Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.
  • It is far better to be alone, than to be in bad company.
  • Leave nothing for tomorrow which can be done today.
  • Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness.
  • Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.
  • Happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected.
  • Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation.
  • Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.
  • Let your Discourse with Men of Business be Short and Comprehensive.
  • To contract new debts is not the way to pay old ones.
  • We should not look back unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dearly bought experience.
  • Nothing can be more hurtful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army the superiority over another.
  • The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.
  • Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.
  • There is nothing which can better deserve your patronage, than the promotion of science and literature.
  • I was summoned by my country, whose voice I can never hear but with veneration and love.

Chris George is an Ottawa-based government affairs advisor and wordsmith, president of CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. Contact: ChrisG.George@gmail.com

Margaret Thatcher on socialism

“The Iron Lady” Margaret Thatcher took office as Prime Minister of Britain in 1979 with the objective to transform what had become a socialist nation to value free enterprise and capitalism once again. In her own words, Thatcher stated: “I came to office with one deliberate intent: to change Britain from a dependent to a self-reliant society—from a give-it-to-me, to a do-it-yourself nation. A get-up-and-go, instead of a sit-back-and-wait-for-it Britain.”

Here is a collection of her bons mots on socialism and its evils:

“It is good to recall how our freedom has been gained in this country—not by great abstract campaigns but through the objections of ordinary men and women to having their money taken from them by the State. In the early days, people banded together and said to the then Government, ‘You shall not take our money before you have redressed our grievances.’ It was their money, their wealth, which was the source of their independence against the Government.”

“The philosophical reason for which we are against nationalization and for private enterprise is because we believe that economic progress comes from the inventiveness, ability, determination and the pioneering spirit of extraordinary men and women. If they cannot exercise that spirit here, they will go away to another free enterprise country which will then make more economic progress than we do. We ought, in fact, to be encouraging small firms and small companies, because the extent to which innovation comes through these companies is tremendous.”

“I was attacked for fighting a rearguard action in defense of ‘middle-class interests.’…Well, if ‘middle class values’ include the encouragement of variety and individual choice, the provision of fair incentives and rewards for skill and hard work, the maintenance of effective barriers against the excessive power of the State and a belief in the wide distribution of individual private property, then they are certainly what I am trying to defend. This is not a fight for ‘privilege’; it is a fight for freedom—freedom for every citizen.”

“Our challenge is to create the kind of economic background which enables private initiative and private enterprise to flourish for the benefit of the consumer, employee, the pensioner, and society as a whole…I believe we should judge people on merit and not on background. I believe the person who is prepared to work hardest should get the greatest rewards and keep them after tax. That we should back the workers and not the shirkers: that it is not only permissible but praiseworthy to want to benefit your own family by your own efforts.”

“I place a profound belief—indeed a fervent faith—in the virtues of self-reliance and personal independence. On these is founded the whole case for the free society, for the assertion that human progress is best achieved by offering the freest possible scope for the development of individual talents, qualified only by a respect for the qualities and the freedom of others…For many years there has been a subtle erosion of the essential virtues of the free society. Self-reliance has been sneered at as if it were an absurd suburban pretention. Thrift has been denigrated as if it were greed. The desire of parents to choose and to struggle for what they themselves regarded as the best possible education for their children has been scorned.”

“I do not believe, in spite of all this, that the people of this country have abandoned their faith in the qualities and characteristics which made them a great people. Not a bit of it. We are still the same people. All that has happened is that we have temporarily lost confidence in our own strength. We have lost sight of the banners. The trumpets have given an uncertain sound. It is our duty, our purpose, to raise those banners high, so that all can see them, to sound the trumpets clearly and boldly so that all can hear them. Then we shall not have to convert people to our principles. They will simply rally to those which truly are their own.”

“I shall never stop fighting. I mean this country to survive, to prosper and to be free…I haven’t fought the destructive forces of socialism for more than twenty years in order to stop now, when the critical phase of the struggle is upon us.”

“What are the lessons then that we’ve learned from the last thirty years? First, that the pursuit of equality itself is a mirage. What’s more desirable and more practicable than the pursuit of equality is the pursuit of equality of opportunity. And opportunity means nothing unless it includes the right to be unequal and the freedom to be different. One of the reasons that we value individuals is not because they’re all the same, but because they’re all different. I believe you have a saying in the Middle West: ‘Don’t cut down the tall poppies. Let them rather grow tall.’ I would say, let our children grow tall and some taller than others if they have the ability in them to do so. Because we must build a society in which each citizen can develop his full potential, both for his own benefit and for the community as a whole, a society in which originality, skill, energy and thrift are rewarded, in which we encourage rather than restrict the variety and richness of human nature.”

“Let me give you my vision. A man’s right to work as he will to spend what he earns, to own property, to have the State as servant and not as master; these are the British inheritance. They are the essence of a free economy. And on that freedom all our others depend.”

“Some socialists seem to believe that people should be numbers in a State computer. We believe they should be individuals. We are all unequal. No one, thank heavens, is like anyone else, however much the socialists may pretend otherwise. We believe that everyone has the right to be unequal but to us every human being is equally important.”

“The socialists tell us that there are massive profits in a particular industry and they should not go to the shareholders—but that the public should reap the benefits. Benefits? What benefits? When you take into public ownership a profitable industry, the profits soon disappear. The goose that laid the golden eggs goes broody. State geese are not great layers. The steel industry was nationalized some years ago in the public interest—yet the only interest now left to the public is in witnessing the depressing spectacle of their money going down the drain at a rate of a million pounds a day.”

“There are others who warn not only of the threat from without, but of something more insidious, not readily perceived, not always deliberate, something that is happening here at home. What are they pointing to? They are pointing to the steady and remorseless expansion of the socialist State. Now none of us would claim that the majority of socialists are inspired by other than humanitarian and well-meaning ideals. At the same time few would, I think, deny today that they have made a monster that they can’t control. Increasingly, inexorably, the State the socialists have created is becoming more random in the economic and social justice it seeks to dispense, more suffocating in its effect on human aspirations and initiative, more politically selective in its defense of the rights of its citizens, more gargantuan in its appetite—and more disastrously incompetent in its performance. Above all, it poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.”

“One of our principal and continuing priorities when we are returned to office will be to restore the freedoms which the Socialists have usurped. Let them learn that it is not a function of the State to possess as much as possible. It is not a function of the State to grab as much as it can get away with. It is not a function of the State to act as ring-master, to crack the whip, dictate the load which all of us must carry or say how high we may climb. It is not a function of the State to ensure that no-one climbs higher than anyone else. All that is the philosophy of socialism. We reject it utterly for, however well-intended, it leads in one direction only: to the erosion and finally the destruction of the democratic way of life.”

“There is no such thing as ‘safe’ socialism. If it’s safe, it’s not socialism. And if it’s socialism, it’s not safe. The signposts of socialism point downhill to less freedom, less prosperity, downhill to more muddle, more failure. If we follow them to their destination, they will lead this nation into bankruptcy.”

“The economic success of the Western world is a product of its moral philosophy and practice. The economic results are better because the moral philosophy is superior. It is superior because it starts with the individual, with his uniqueness, his responsibility, and his capacity to choose. Surely this is infinitely preferable to the socialist-statist philosophy which sets up a centralized economic system to which the individual must conform, which subjugates him, directs him and denies him the right to free choice. Choice is the essence of ethics: if there were no choice, there would be no ethics, no good, no evil; good and evil have meaning only insofar as man is free to choose.”

“In our philosophy the purpose of the life of the individual is not to be the servant of the State and its objectives, but to make the best of his talents and qualities. The sense of being self-reliant, of playing a role within the family, of owning one’s own property, of paying one’s way, are all part of the spiritual ballast which maintains responsible citizenship, and provides the solid foundation from which people look around to see what more they might do, for others and for themselves. That is what we mean by a moral society; not a society where the State is responsible for everything, and no-one is responsible for the State.”

“Once you give people the idea that all this can be done by the State, and that it is somehow second-best or even degrading to leave it to private people…then you will begin to deprive human beings of one of the essential ingredients of humanity—personal moral responsibility. You will in effect dry up in them the milk of human kindness. If you allow people to hand over to the State all their personal responsibility, the time will come—indeed it is close at hand—when what the taxpayer is willing to provide for the good of humanity will be seen to be far less than what the individual used to be willing to give from love of his neighbour. So do not be tempted to identify virtue with collectivism. I wonder whether the State services would have done as much for the man who fell among thieves as the Good Samaritan did for him?”

“Popular capitalism, which is the economic expression of liberty, is proving a much more attractive means for diffusing power in our society. Socialists cry “Power to the people,” and raise the clenched fist as they say it. We all know what they really mean—power over people, power to the State. To us Conservatives, popular capitalism means what it says: power through ownership to the man and woman in the street, given confidently with an open hand.”

“I think we have gone through a period when too many children and people have been given to understand ‘I have a problem, it is the Government’s job to cope with it!’ or ‘I have a problem, I will go and get a grant to cope with it!’ ‘I am homeless, the Government must house me!’ and so they are casting their problems on society and who is society? There is no such thing! There are individual men and women and there are families and no government can do anything except through people and people look to themselves first. It is our duty to look after ourselves and then also to help look after our neighbor and life is a reciprocal business and people have got the entitlements too much in mind without the obligations. There is no such thing as society. There is living tapestry of men and women and people and the beauty of that tapestry and the quality of our lives will depend upon how much each of us is prepared to take responsibility for ourselves and each of us prepared to turn around and help by our own efforts those who are unfortunate.”

“I set out to destroy socialism because I felt it was at odds with the character of the people. We were the first country in the world to roll back the frontiers of socialism, then roll forward the frontiers of freedom. We reclaimed our heritage; we are renewing it and carrying it forward.”

Chris George is an Ottawa-based government affairs advisor and wordsmith, president of CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. Contact: ChrisG.George@gmail.com

(This collection of quotes was acquired from a post on the Foundation for Economic Education: Margaret Thatcher on socialism – 20 of her best quotes / Photo credit:  Marion S. Trikosko [Public domain])

 

John Wooden: 10 of Life’s Lessons

Leafing through a old February 2000 Esquire magazine last night, I came across a “John Wooden: What I’ve Learned” article. Here are ten short observations on life from the legendary basketball coach. He was 89 when he gave this interview:

  • You can do more good by being good than any other way.
  • Be more concerned with your character than your reputation.
  • If I am through learning, I am through.
  • Discipline yourself and others won’t need to.
  • Don’t let making a living prevent you from making a life.
  • I don’t believe in praying to win.
  • I had three rules for my players: No profanity. Don’t criticize a teammate. Never be late.
  • If a player’s not doing the things he should, put him on the bench. He’ll come around.
  • Never let your emotions overrule your head.
  • Passion is momentary; love is enduring.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Margaret Thatcher’s musings on politics

  • Being prime minister is a lonely job… you cannot lead from the crowd. 
  • I always cheer up immensely if an attack is particularly wounding because I think, well, if they attack one personally, it means they have not a single political argument left. 
  • I am in politics because of the conflict between good and evil, and I believe that in the end good will triumph. 
  • Nothing is more obstinate than a fashionable consensus. 
  • One of the things being in politics has taught me is that men are not a reasoned or reasonable sex. 
  • Standing in the middle of the road is very dangerous; you get knocked down by the traffic from both sides. 
  • Of course it’s the same old story. Truth usually is the same old story. 
  • There can be no liberty unless there is economic liberty. 
  • There is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women, and there are families. 
  • This lady is not for turning. 
  • To cure the British disease with socialism was like trying to cure leukaemia with leeches. 
  • To me, consensus seems to be the process of abandoning all beliefs, principles, values and policies. So it is something in which no one believes and to which no one objects. 
  • We were told our campaign wasn’t sufficiently slick. We regard that as a compliment. 
  • You don’t tell deliberate lies, but sometimes you have to be evasive. 
  • You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it. 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Allan Gotlieb and 10 Rules for Canada-U.S. Relations

Former Canadian Ambassador Allan Gotlieb died last month but his approach to Canada-U.S. relations has revolutionized Canadian diplomacy with our closest cultural and largest trading partner. Gotlieb insights into America and the value of a pro-active diplomatic relations continue to have great relevance today.

Gotlieb’s methodical approach is best described in I’ll Be With You In A Minute, Mr. Ambassador: The Education of a Canadian Diplomat in Washington. It contains the Gotlieb “decalogue” for the conduct of the “new diplomacy” in Washington.

  1. The particular process by which a decision is reached in Washington is often so complex and mysterious that it defies comprehension.
  2. The most important requirement for effective diplomacy in Washington is the ability to gain access to the participants in the decision-making process.
  3. Given the vast numbers of players in the field of decision-making, and the great difficulty of predicting their likely behavior, the highest possible premium must be placed on political intelligence.
  4. Since there are so many participants in decision-making, so many special-interest and pressure groups and so many shifting alliances, a diplomat cannot design any grand or overarching strategy to further his nation’s interests. Every issue involves its own micro-strategy and every micro-strategy is unique.
  5. In Washington, a foreign power is itself just another special interest and not a very special one at that.
  6. A foreign power, as a general rule, has no permanent friends or adversaries on Capitol Hill.
  7. A foreign power, as a general rule, has no permanent friends or adversaries within the Administration.
  8. No permanent solutions are within reach of the ambassador or his government, only temporary ones. Instability is the norm, alliances and coalitions are always being forged, forces and counter forces are always mounting.
  9. Effective diplomacy means public diplomacy. The line between public diplomacy and interference in local affairs is a thin one and thus it must be practiced with considerable fi nesse.
  10. The best and often the only way to gain access to all the key players is through the social route. In Washington, parties are a continuation of work by other means.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Marcus Aurelius’ 10 Rules for an Exceptional Leader

MarcusAureliusThe Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius ruled from 161 to 180 A.D. Aurelius is renown for being the ideal wise leader whom Plato called the “philosopher king.” His book, Meditations (from which By George has often quoted), has inspired leaders for centuries because of its timeless wisdom about human behavior.

Here are 10 rules, as prescribed by Marcus Aurelius, that every great leader should know and practice.

1. Understand that people exist to help one another. Mankind was meant to live in harmony, “That we came into the world for the sake of one another.”

2. Be mindful of others’ humanity. Every person has dignity and pride.

3. Realize that many mistakes, even egregious ones, are the result of ignorance.
Punishment or chastisement should thus be done in an educational way.

4. Do not overly exalt yourself. “You’re just like them.”

5. Avoid quick judgments of others’ actions. “A lot of things are means to some other end. You have to know an awful lot before you can judge other people’s actions with real understanding.”

6. Maintain self-control. You can choose to spend your time and energy languishing over things that have already happened, or you can choose to be calm and address any problems that arise.

7. Recognize that others can hurt you only if you let them. The only actions that should truly hurt you are things you do that are shameful, since you are in control of your own self-worth and values.

8. Know that pessimism can easily overtake you. “How much more damage anger and grief do than the things that cause them.”

9. Practice kindness. Sincere kindness is “invincible” and more powerful than any negative transgression.

10. Do not expect bad people to exempt you from their destructive ways. It is “the act of a tyrant” to think that you can try to change these kinds of people or persuade them to treat you differently.

To read more on these rules click here.

Read more in the By George Journal of this great leader and sage here:  Marcus Aurelius

.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

20 quotes on leadership

  • If you’re actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader. – John Quincy Adams
  • A leader is a dealer in hope. – Napoleon Bonaparte
  • Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy. – Norman Schwarzkopf
  • In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. – Thomas Jefferson
  • Where there is no vision, the people perish. – Proverbs 29:18
  • People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. – Theodore Roosevelt
  • Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt to offer a solution everybody can understand. – Colin Powell
  • A highly credible leader under-promises and over-delivers. – John C. Maxwell
  • The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality; the last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant. – Max De Pree
  • Don’t tell people how to do things, tell them what do and let them surprise you with their results. – George S. Patton
  • To lead people, walk beside them. As for the best leaders, the people do not notice their existence … When the best leader’s work is done, the people say, ‘We did it ourselves!’” – Lao Tsu
  • Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing. – Albert Schweitzer
  • All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. – John Kenneth Galbraith
  • Our chief want is someone who will inspire us to be what we know we could be. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. – Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Treat a man as he is and he will remain as he is. Treat a man as he can and should be and he will become as he can and should be. – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall. – Stephen R. Covey
  • Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. – John F. Kennedy
  • Great leadership is about human experiences. It’s not a formula or a program. It is a human activity that comes from the heart and considers the hearts of others. It is an attitude, not a routine. – Lance Secretan
  • Leaders aren’t born, they are made. – Vince Lombardi

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

10 rules for crisis management

We are often asked advice about our rules of communications during a crisis. It is best if organizations think about crises before they hit. Be assured, a little bit of preparation will pay off ten-fold.

So, here’re 10 rules CG&A COMMUNICATIONS promotes to assist with crisis management:

1.  Write it down! Before a crisis occurs, draw up and distribute a comprehensive crisis communications plan. Always have a plan on paper.

2.  Know who will speak. Designate a small list of possible spokespersons and ensure they have training to give media interviews. The objective in responding during a crisis is to have a single voice, not a chorus.

3.  Organize yourself. Establish internal communications lines to ensure fast, accurate information when a crisis does occur. Prepare a list of inside and outside people to inform of a crisis. And, ensure all employees know where to direct media inquiries.

4.  Make good first impression. When the issue breaks, there must be an immediate meeting with senior management to determine the stance to take with the public. You have two critical hours to effectively respond. Your challenge is to define the issue accurately, deploy constantly changing tactics, and anticipate reactions.

5.  Prepare for media. Spend time briefing designated spokesperson(s) and ensure message lines are tight and clear.

6.  Be pro-active. Get out in front of the issue/event and make a public statement. No comment is no response and silence is anything but golden.

7.  Keep everyone in-the-know. Remember to keep your own house informed. Distribute statement to staff and other key people.

8.  Keep the channel(s) to media open. The media must know who the spokespersons are. An inquiry number should be made available to send and receive messages. In a crisis, it is essential that you are honest, accessible, and forthcoming.

9.  Always stay ahead of the issue. If the crisis is on-going, release periodic statements or hold periodic media briefings/news conferences.

10.  Never follow a list of ten golden rules. Each crisis is unique and requires special tactics to ensure the issues are dealt with effectively. Do not limit your options in answering to your crisis. A creative, pro-active plan is your best offense.

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

The essence of leadership

Alexander the Great“Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and action.” – as quoted by American business leader Harold S. Geneen. This truth is borne out by the actions of Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.) is this demonstrative tale as told by the Plutarch.

       Alexander the Great was leading his army homeward after the great victory against Portus in India. The country through which they now marched was bare and desert, and his army suffered dreadfully from heat, hunger, and, most of all, thirst. The soldiers’ lips cracked and their throats burned from want of water, and many were ready to lie down and give up.

       About noon one day the army met a party of Greek travelers. They were on mules, and carried with them a few vessels filled with water. One of them, seeing the king almost chocking from thirst, filled a helmet and offered it to him.

       Alexander took it into his hands, then looked around at the faces of his suffering soldiers, who craved refreshment just as much as he did.

       “Take it away,” he said, “for if I drink alone, the rest will be out of heart, and you have not enough for all.”

       So he handed the water back without touching a drop of it. And the soldiers, cheering their king, leaped to their feet, and demanded to be led forward.

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Harold S. Geneen sharing good business sense

Here are a dozen quotes on a decent approach to the world of business from the legendary, American corporate leader Harold S. Geneen.

  • The worst disease which can afflict executives in their work is not, as popularly supposed, alcoholism; it’s egotism.
  • You can’t run a business or anything else on a theory.
  • In business, words are words; explanations are explanations, promises are promises, but only performance is reality.
  • Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions.
  • Leadership cannot really be taught, it can only be learned.
  • Better a good decision quickly than the best decision too late.
  • A true leader has to have a genuine open-door policy so that his people are not afraid to approach him for any reason.
  • I don’t believe in just ordering people to do things. You have to sort of grab an oar and row with them.
  • The best way to inspire people to superior performance is to convince them by everything you do and by your everyday attitude that you are wholeheartedly supporting them.
  • The only unforgivable sin in business is to run out of cash.
  • Telephones, hotels, insurance—it’s all the same. If you know the numbers inside out, you know the company inside out.
  • In the business world, everyone is paid in two coins: Cash and Experience. Take the experience first. The cash will come later.

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

20 Brian Tracy Quotes on Leadership

 

“Integrity is the most valuable and respected quality of leadership. Always keep your word.”

 

“Leadership is the ability to get extraordinary achievement from ordinary people”

 

“Leaders set high standards. Refuse to tolerate mediocrity or poor performance”

 

“Clarity is the key to effective leadership. What are your goals?”

 

“The best leaders have a high Consideration Factor. They really care about their people”

 

“Leaders think and talk about the solutions. Followers think and talk about the problems.”

 

“The key responsibility of leadership is to think about the future. No one else can do it for you.”

 

“The effective leader recognizes that they are more dependent on their people than they are on them. Walk softly.”

 

“Leaders never use the word failure. They look upon setbacks as learning experiences.”

 

“Practice Golden Rule Management in everything you do. Manage others the way you would like to be managed.”

 

“Superior leaders are willing to admit a mistake and cut their losses. Be willing to admit that you’ve changed your mind. Don’t persist when the original decision turns out to be a poor one.”

 

“Leaders are anticipatory thinkers. They consider all consequences of their behaviors before they act.”

 

“The true test of leadership is how well you function in a crisis.”

 

“Leaders concentrate single-mindedly on one thing– the most important thing, and they stay at it until it’s complete.”

 

The three ‘C’s’ of leadership are Consideration, Caring, and Courtesy. Be polite to everyone.

 

“Respect is the key determinant of high-performance leadership. How much people respect you determines how well they perform.”

 

“Leadership is more who you are than what you do.”

 

“Entrepreneurial leadership requires the ability to move quickly when opportunity presents itself.”

 

“Leaders are innovative, entrepreneurial, and future oriented. They focus on getting the job done.”

 

“Leaders are never satisfied; they continually strive to be better.”

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Leaders within our Workplace

In surfing through old business columns (dated 2010), we came across a good commentary on effective leadership in today’s workplace. Dave Jones, then with Proximity Canada in Toronto, comments on the distinction between two types of people in the workplace – managers and leaders.

Jones says: “There are few true leaders in the world.  It’s risky.  It’s hard.  It’s often times unappreciated.”  

Here’s his distinction.

 

Managers:

  • deal with what’s handed to them
  • iterate on what’s been done
  • chart a course in ink
  • check boxes
  • have “not my…” in their vocabulary i.e. department, job, budget, responsibility
  • lean to the conservative
  • maximize resources against goals
  • measure at the end

 

Leaders:

  • redefine their environment
  • allergic to “this is how we’ve always done it”
  • head in a direction, but not certain to reach destination
  • colour outside the boxes
  • strive to be innovative
  • focus resources on goals; but saves some for the sandbox
  • measure along the way; course-correcting on the fly

 

SOURCE:

http://davejones.ca/blog/2010/11/17/manager-or-leader-whats-the-future-of-the-corporate-social-s.html

    

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Modern Business Wisdom

“In today’s business environment, a company’s website is the key to their entire business.” – Marcus Sheridan

“In the digital space, attention is a currency. We earn it. We spend it.” – Brian Solis

“Content is fire; social media is gasoline.” – Jay Baer

“Mass marketing is turning into a mass of niches.” – Chris Anderson

“The customer’s perception is your reality.” – Kate Zabriskie

“Content marketing is no longer a numbers game. It’s a game of relevance.” – Jason Miller

“Content is the fuel for your lead generation efforts.” – Dayna Rothman

“Marketing is telling the world you’re a rock star. Content marketing is showing the world you are one.” – Robert Rose

“The key is, no matter what story you tell, make your buyer the hero.” – Chris Brogan

“Every email is an opportunity to test a different benefit or angle.” – Heather Morgan

“There is no sale without the story; no knockout without the setup.” – Gary Vavnerchuk

“We need to stop interrupting what people are interested in and be what people are interested in.” – Craig Davis

“Listening is not about skills or techniques or calculated movements or gestures. Listening is not about what you do. Listening is about what you intend, what you feel, who you are.” – Gavin Ingham

“When reps take the role of a curious student rather than an informed expert, buyers are much more inclined to engage.” – Jeff Hoffman

“People buy emotionally, and they justify their decisions intellectually.” – David Sandler

“Pretend that every single person you meet has a sign around his or her neck that says, ‘Make me feel important.’ Not only will you succeed in sales, you will succeed in life.” – Mary Kay Ash

“Prospects are making their purchase decision based on whether they think you understand their problems and you have the knowledge, resources and commitment to solve them.” – Trish Bertuzzi

“If you are not taking care of your customer, your competitor will.” – Bob Hooey

“Don’t find customers for your products. Find products for your customers.” – Seth Godin

“A brand for a company is like a reputation for a person. You earn reputation by trying to do hard things well.” – Jeff Bezos

“You are your greatest asset. Put your time, effort and money into training.” – Tom Hopkins

“For every sale you miss because you’re too enthusiastic, you will miss a hundred because you’re not enthusiastic enough.” – Zig Ziglar

“A mediocre person tells. A good person explains. A superior person demonstrates. A great person inspires others to see for themselves.” – Harvey Mackay

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Colin Powell: 13 Rules

Colin_Powell_1

In his memoir It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, Colin Powell provided a valuable list of life lessons accompanied by a collection of personal anecdotes. For this great man, there are 13 Rules to how to live life.

Rule 1. It ain’t as bad as you think. It will look better in the morning. Keep all things in perspective when having to make a tough decision. Give the matter the perspective of some time.

Rule 2. Get mad, then get over it. Do not carry anger for any time. Instead of letting anger destroy you, use it to make constructive change.

Rule 3. Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it. Whatever position you hold, check your ego at the door when you are making major decisions. Foremost, consider the good of the organization and people in the organization. Then, should the action fail, your intentions never do.

Rule 4. It can be done! Exude optimist. Be positive. Leaders are about making things happen.

Rule 5. Be careful what you choose. Consider wisely your choices. Project ahead and assess the best developments for your objective(s).

Rule 6. Don’t let adverse facts stand in the way of a good decision. Solid leadership is often a matter of superb instinct. Leaders often stand alone on what they know to be the right decision.

Rule 7. You can’t make someone else’s choices. While good leaders listen and consider all perspectives, they ultimately make their own decisions. Ultimate responsibility is yours.

Rule 8. Check small things. Mind the details. Small details often ensure the success of your big decisions.

Rule 9. Share credit. Share the credit, take the blame, and quietly find out and fix things that went wrong. Success is very much a team effort.

Rule 10. Remain calm. Be kind. The difference between a good leader and a great leader is their degree of kindness. Kindness, like calmness, reassures loyalty and galvanizes respect and confidence.

Rule 11. Have a vision. Be demanding. Your vision must inspire – incite and enthuse. Your purpose is the fuel for the vision. It energizes – drives it. Be compelling and excite those around you.

Rule 12. Don’t take counsel of your fears or naysayers. Fear is a normal human emotion that has the potential to be a paralyzing force. So, acknowledge your fears, stare them down, but don’t let them guide your decisions.

Rule 13. Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier. Perpetual optimism, believing in yourself, believing in your purpose, believing you will prevail, and demonstrating passion and confidence will have an amazingly beneficial impact on those around you. There is something to be said for the leader who refuses to accept defeat but continues to adapt until he is successful.

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

More of Napoleon’s bons mots

More insight from Napoleon Bonaparte:

  • He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat.
  • A man will fight harder for his interests than for his rights.
  • The torment of precautions often exceeds the dangers to be avoided. It is sometimes better to abandon one’s self to destiny.
  • Men take only their needs into consideration, never their abilities.
  • To do all that one is able to do is to be a man; to do all that one would like to do is to be a god.
  • Courage is like love, it must have hope for nourishment.
  • As to moral courage, I have very rarely met with the two o’clock in the morning kind. I mean unprepared courage, that which is necessary on an unexpected occasion, and which, in spite of the most unforeseen events, leaves full freedom of judgement and decision.
  • The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue.
  • How many really capable men are children more than once during the day?
  • All the scholastic scaffolding falls, as a ruined edifice, before a single word: faith.
  • If they want peace, nations should avoid the pinpricks that precede cannon shots.
  • 10 persons who speak make more noise than 10,000 who are silent.
  • Riches do not consist in the possession of treasures, but in the use made of them.
  • You may ask me for anything you like except time.
  • Time is one kind of robber whom the law does not strike at, and who steals what is most precious to men.
  • If you start to take Vienna – take Vienna.
  • Circumstances-what are circumstances? I make circumstances.
  • One must change one’s tactics every ten years if one wishes to maintain one’s superiority.
  • This man Wellington is so stupid he does not know when he is beaten, and goes on fighting.
  • The greatest general is he who makes the fewest mistakes.
  • My downfall raises me to infinite heights.
  • Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Napoleon on the art of governing and leadership

Here are By George’s favourite 10 quotes of Napoleon Bonaparte on the subject of governing and effective leadership:

  1. The art of governing consists in not letting men grow old in their jobs.
  2. A leader is a dealer in hope.
  3. The heart of a statesman should be in his head.
  4. Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.
  5. There are two levers for moving men – interest and fear.
  6. With audacity one can undertake anything.
  7. Ability is of little account without opportunity.
  8. The strong man is the one who is able to intercept at will the communication between the senses and the mind.
  9. All celebrated people lose dignity on a close view.
  10. Victory belongs to the most persevering.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The wisdom of QB Tom Brady

Tom Brady did it again yesterday, leading his New England Patriots team to an amazing 4th quarter comeback Superbowl victory. Brady becomes the first QB with 5 NFL championship rings. So, to follow-up on this game-for-the-ages, By George compiled our 15 FAV observations of a truly great football quarterback – and a decent human being.

  • Football is unconditional love.
  • If you don’t play to win, don’t play at all.
  • You wanna know which ring is my favorite? The next one.
  • I didn’t come this far to only come this far, so we’ve still got further to go.
  • I think that at the start of a game, you’re always playing to win, and then maybe if you’re ahead late in the game, you start playing not to lose. The true competitors, though, are the ones who always play to win.
  • Mentally, the only players who survive in the pros are the ones able to manage all their responsibilities. Everybody struggles in different ways.
  • If you don’t believe in yourself why is anyone else going to believe in you?
  • A lot of times I find that people who are blessed with the most talent don’t ever develop that attitude, and the ones who aren’t blessed in that way are the most competitive and have the biggest heart.
  • I’m not a person who defends myself very often. I kind of let my actions speak for me.
  • To me, football is so much about mental toughness, it’s digging deep, it’s doing whatever you need to do to help a team win and that comes in a lot of shapes and forms.
  • You have to believe in your process. You have to believe in the things that you are doing to help the team win. I think you have to take the good with the bad.
  • Too often in life, something happens and we blame other people for us not being happy or satisfied or fulfilled. So the point is, we all have choices, and we make the choice to accept people or situations or to not accept situations.
  • We all have experiences in our lives that change us, and we all learn from people, like my dad, but at the end of the day, it’s only us. And we’re only responsible to make ourselves happy.
  • You know, watching Dan Marino and Steve Young get nominated to the Hall of Fame… those guys are unbelievable and they did it for so long. I’d love to play like those guys, but there’s still a long way to go and a lot of growing.
  • If I have something to say, I want it to be meaningful.

.

Chris George, providing reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The Dalai Lama (5 memes)

These memes have appear through this past year both on By George Twitter @ByGeorgeJournal and on the BGJ Facebook page. The Dalai Lama provides inspiration and reason to pause for millions around the world. He is truly a spiritual guiding light.

bgj_top36

bg183

bg186

bg185

bg187

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Jack Welch’s Strategic Questions

Jack Welch is the infamous American business executive who guided General Electric for two decades. Today he is author and business coach and he shares his business acumen in many profile articles.

 

In a recent LinkedIn article, Welch lists the core questions to ask when developing (or reviewing) a successful business strategy. There are five key lines of questioning to begin a thorough assessment.

 

1  What does the playing field look like now?

  • Who are the competitors in this business, large and small, new and old?
  • Who has what share, globally and in each market? Where do we fit in?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of each competitor? How good are their products? How much does each one spend on R&D? How big is each sales force? How performance-driven is each culture?
  • Who are this business’s main customers and how do they buy?

 

2  What has the competition been up to?

  • What has each competitor done in the past year to change the playing field?
  • Has anyone introduced game-changing new products, new technologies, or a new distribution channel?
  • Are there any announced or potential new entrants, and what have they been up to in the past year?

 

3  What have you been up to?

  • What have you done in the past year to change the competitive playing field?
  • Have you bought a company, introduced a new product, stolen a competitor’s key salesperson, or licensed a new technology from a start-up?
  • Have you lost any competitive advantages that you once had – a great salesperson, a special product, a proprietary technology?

 

4  What’s around the corner?

  • What scares you most in the year ahead — what one or two things could a competitor do to nail you?
  • Is your top talent secure, and are you caring for them appropriately, with pay, perks, and a culture that inspires them?
  • What new products or technologies could your competitors launch that might change the game?
  • What M&A deals would knock you off your feet?

 

5.  What’s your winning move?

  • What can you do to change the playing field – is it an acquisition, a new product, globalization, or better talent?
  • What can you do to make customers stick to you more than ever before and more than anyone else?

 

To read the full article, here is LinkedIn link.

 

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

It’s not the critic who counts

CGA Poster Quotes:Finals

Perhaps one of the most motivational sayings is that of Theodore Roosevelt’s “It’s not the critic who counts.”

Through life there are many nay-sayers, but Teddy Roosevelt wisely points out that a man who acts, who presses forward in the face of criticism and failure, is a man who lives and has no regrets.

It’s not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or when the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worth cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.

This passage is from a speech delivered by the 26th President of the USA in Paris in 1910. Click here to read the full speech.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.