Category Archives: Features

News, articles and opinion pieces

Top-10 List of Canadian Symbols

In celebrating Canada Day in 2020, By George is producing a Top-10 List of Canadian Symbols.

For this list By George consulted the following:  WatchMojo.com, Yahoo Answers, The Canadian Guide and Canada.com. Ultimately, however the By George braintrust selected and ranked the top ten list.

Here are Honourable Mentions:

The Bluenose, totem poles, toque, ice sculptures, soapstone carvings, plate of poutine, maple sap bucket and the RCMP

The By George Top-10 List of Canadian Symbols

10. Wilderness (mountains, wheat fields, shoreline, forests, etc.)

9. The Loon

8. Maple Syrup

7. The Moose

6. The Canoe

5. Niagara Falls

4. Tim Hortons

3. The Beaver

2. Hockey

1. The Maple Leaf

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Quotes on Hockey’s Greats

  • To play so well and for so long is simply incredible. No player will ever do the things in hockey that Gordie [Howe] did. – Wayne Gretzky
  • The finest athlete of them all, that’s what Gordie [Howe] is. And when I say athlete I’m talking about any sport. Take everything into consideration: his age, his record, his condition. There are some pretty good athletes around, great boxers, great football players, everything, but Gordie is in a league by himself. I’d be proud to be half the man on or off the ice that Gordie is. – Bobby Orr
  • On sheer ability, Mario [Lemieux] is good enough to win scoring titles with a broken stick. On pure talent, he’s the best there is. But Wayne [Gretzky] almost never disappoints you. He comes to work every night. – Bobby Orr
  • Gretzky would dominate in any era. It doesn’t make any difference. He may well be the smartest hockey player who ever played the game. – Phil Esposito
  • Gretzky is something else again… he strikes me as the first nondescript hockey star. Sometimes you don’t even realize he’s out there, watching as he whirls, until he emerges out of nowhere, finding open ice, and accelerating to a score… Gretzky is arguably the best player hockey has ever know. – Mordecai Richler
  • By far Gretzky is the most talented player ever. Every time he gets the puck something exciting happens. – Mike Milbury
  • He is hockey now. Although virtually every age of the game has had its pre-eminent players – Morenz, Richard, Howe, Hull, Orr – no one has ever transcended it as he has. – Peter Gzowski
  • I’m not sure Mario [Lemieux] is going to get the accolades he deserves, especially from outside the game. But from within, the players, the people who follow closely, realize exactly what he’s brought to the table, exactly what he has done… – Wayne Gretzky
  • He had talent for everything. How big he is, how he protects the puck, his hands, how smart he is on the ice, all the plays he made. He was always the smartest player on the ice…. With him, it’s easy. It’s just natural ability. – Vincent Lecavalier
  • No disrespect to Wayne Gretzky, Gordie Howe, Mark Messier, Bobby Orr, Gilbert Perreault…. But Mario [Lemieux] did things nobody else could ever do. – Bryan Trottier
  • The greatest hockey player who ever lived: Bobby Orr, and I love him. – Don Cherry
  • If I can be half the hockey player that Bobby Orr was, I’ll be happy. – Ray Bourque
  • There ought to be two leagues, one for the pros and one for Beliveau. – Dollard St. Laurent
  • I may not be the hockey player Jean Beliveau was, but some day I hope to be the man he is – Guy Lafleur
  • From the blue line in, I never saw a player as exciting as [Maurice] Richard. When he had the goalie beat, he finished it off, and you had no chance to recover. – Emile Francis
  • Rocket [Maurice Richard] had that mean look in every game we played. He was 100 percent hockey. He could hate with the best of them. – Gordie Howe
  • He could shoot harder than anybody I see nowadays. When he’d wind up behind the net he wasn’t number 7, he was number 777, just a blur. – Roy Worters

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a trusted executive assistant, a communications can-do guy, or a go-to-scribe? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top-10 List of Canadian Inventions

In celebrating Canada Day in 2020, By George is producing a Top-10 List of Canadian Inventions.

For this list By George consulted the following: CBC’s Greatest Canadian Invention, CBC survey, Yahoo and Thought Company. Ultimately, however the By George braintrust selected and ranked the top ten list.

Here are Honourable Mentions:

Canoe, jetliner, the pager, garbage bag, peanut butter, road lines, Archie (the first internet search engine), basketball, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, instant mashed potatoes, snowblower, snowmobile, Robertson Screw, paint roller, wireless radio, and the Wonderbra.

The By George Top-10 List of Canadian Inventions 

10. IMAX

9. Jet Liner

8. Game of Hockey

7. The Canadarm

6. Electric Wheelchair

5. Zipper

4. Artificial Pacemaker

3. Light Bulb

2. Insulin

1. Telephone

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top-10 List of Canadian Songs

In celebrating Canada Day in 2020, By George is producing a Top-10 List of Canadian Songs through the modern times.

For this list By George consulted the following:  CBC Music, Strong Words, Billboard’s 100 Canadian #1s, Zoomer Magazine and Indie 8.  Ultimately, however the By George braintrust selected and ranked the top ten list.

Here are Honourable Mentions:

Stompin’ Tom Connors – The Hockey Song, Paul Anka – Diana, Ian Tyson – Four Strong Winds, Rita MacNeil – She’s Called Nova Scotia, The Band – The Weight, Gordon Lightfoot – The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, Gordon Lightfoot – Sundown, The Guess Who – These Eyes, Joni Mitchell – Both Sides Now, Anne Murray – Could I Have This Dance, Sarah McLachlan – Angel, Jann Arden – Insensitive, Jann Arden – Good Mother, Bryan Adams – Summer of ’69, Tom Cochrane – Life is a Highway, The Tragically Hip – Bobcaygeon, Alanis Morissette – Ironic, Justin Bieber – Despacito, Drake –God’s Plan, and Bill Ray Cyrus – Old Town Road.

The By George Top-10 List of Canadian Songs

10. Bryan Adams – Everything I Do I Do It For You

9. Avril Lavigne – Complicated

8. Blue Rodeo – Try

7. Celine Dion – Because You Loved Me

6. Paul Anka – My Way

5. Neil Young – Heart of Gold

4. Bachman Turner Overdrive – Takin’ Care of Business

3. The Guess Who – American Woman

2. Leonard Cohen – Hallelujah

1. Anne Murray – Snowbird

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top-10 List of Canadian Foods

In celebrating Canada Day in 2020, By George is producing a Top-10 List of Canadian Foods.

For this list By George consulted the following: Hostelworld.com, Readers’ Digest, Yahoo, Canadian Living, and the Taste Atlas. Ultimately, however the By George braintrust selected and ranked the top ten list.

Here are the Honourable Mentions:

Nova Scotian Lobster Rolls, Saskatoon berry pie, Beavertails, Montreal-style Bagels, Maple Taffy, Sugar pie, Hawaiian pizza (with pineapples!), Split Pea Soup, Moose Burgers, and the drink Caesar (with Clamato Juice)

The By George Top-10 List of Canadian Foods

10. Halifax Donair

9. Kraft Dinner

8. Nanaimo Bars

7. Peameal Bacon

6. Tourtiere

5. Montreal Smoked Meat Sandwich.

4. Pancakes and (endless) Maple Syrup

3. Cedar Planked Salmon

2. Poutine

1. Butter Tarts

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Top-10 List of Canucks

In celebrating Canada Day in 2020, By George is producing a Top-10 List of Canucks selected through the years of our Nationhood.

For this list By George consulted the following sources:  The Pantheon At M.I.T., Insider.com, CBC Greatest Canadian, Amazon’s IMDb.com, Quora.com, TheMagazine.ca, The Canadian Guide (historical figures), Global News 150 birthday selection, and TopTenz. Ultimately, however the By George braintrust selected and ranked the top ten list.  

Here are Honourable Mentions:

William Shatner, Michael J. Fox, John Candy, Jim Carrey, Martin Short, Avril Lavigne *, Neil Young, Justin Bieber, Gord Downie, Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, Alice Munro, John Kenneth Galbraith, Alex Trebek, Peter Jennings, Nellie McClung, Laura Secord, Isaac Brock, Northrop Frye, Norman Bethune, Tommy Douglas *, Lester B Pearson, Chris Hatfield, James Cameron, Don Cherry, Gordie Howe and Bobby Orr (* – people who were #1 on another list)

The By George Top-10 List of Canucks

10. Lorne (SNL) Michaels

9. Marshall McLuhan

8. Celine Dion

7. Shania Twain *

6. Pierre Trudeau

5. Frederick Banting

4. Sir John A Macdonald

3. Terry Fox * 

2. Wayne Gretzky *

1.  Alexander Graham Bell

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

By George Top-10 Canadian Icons

A few years ago AskMen.com listed the top 10 Canadian icons “that have been branded as our global symbols and that define our Canadian identity.” In ascending order, they picked: maple syrup, Canada goose, beaver, Tim Horton’s, the loon, totem poles, Mounties, the CBC, the maple leaf and their number #1 icon is hockey.

In our own circles, we asked around and have prepared this list:

The By George Top 10 Canadian Icons

10. Newfie jokes, eh! Canadian humour at its best…

9. The beauty of our country’s nature captured in a Group of Seven shoreline painting or with a lone canoeist gliding through the early-morning mist of a fresh water lake

8. A mounted RCMP with Parliament Hill’s Peace Tower serving as his backdrop

7. A Bryan Adams ballad or Margaret Atwood novel – or our country’s next generation of talent – crooner Justin Bieber and renowned Yann Martel

6. Paul Henderson’s ’72 Team Canada sweater – the hopes and dream of a nation immortalized with this $1 million icon

5. The Canada Space Arm reaching out with the globe in the background – a poignant symbol of our remarkable contribution to science and to tomorrow’s dreams

4. A Tim Horton’s double-double and a maple-iced donut (hey, believe it or not in the Maritimes, they’re now ordering 4 x 4s – a coffee with four creams and four sugars!)

3. HNIC’s Coach’s Corner highlighting Bobby Orr soaring through the goal crease, Wayne Gretzky scoring from behind the net, and/or Sydney Crosby skating backward and raising his arms in victory.

2. Terry Fox and his drive and will to make a difference – our memories of Terry’s smile, his curly hair, the lean of his body as he makes his way through the Canadian Shield landscape.

1. The red maple leaf – Through the past forty years, the red leaf in the middle of our nation’s flag has become a definitive icon for Canucks and for the world. From a fluttering flag to the patch on a serviceman’s shoulder, the red maple leaf represents all that is good in our country.

canadiana_03

 

Canada’s #1 Symbol

Through the past few weeks, the By George Journal conducted a Canadiana contest to select the most-Canadian of symbols.  Based on the feedback of our followers, here are the top-three, most-beloved symbols of Canadiana.

 

In reverse order, the top-three selected symbols are:

#3 The RCMP

 

#2 The Game of Hockey

 

#1 The Beaver

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The Maple Leaf Forever!

Here are the words of the chorus and first couple of verses of the song that first united our land – the song that our soldiers marched to in WWI – establishing forever the maple leaf as an enduring symbol of all that is Canadian.

Chorus:

The Maple Leaf, our emblem dear,
The Maple Leaf forever!
God save our Queen and Heaven bless
The Maple Leaf forever!

In days of yore, from Britain’s shore,

Wolfe, the dauntless hero, came
And planted firm Britannia’s flag
On Canada’s fair domain.
Here may it wave, our boast our pride
And, joined in love together,
The thistle, shamrock, rose entwine
The Maple Leaf forever!

Chorus

At Queenston Heights and Lundy’s Lane,
Our brave fathers, side by side,
For freedom, homes and loved ones dear,
Firmly stood and nobly died;
And those dear rights which they maintained,
We swear to yield them never!
Our watchword evermore shall be
“The Maple Leaf forever!”

Chorus

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Happy Efisga Day, er, Canada Day

Have you wondered where the name ‘Canada’ comes from?

It’s the Huron-Iroquois word ‘kanata’ which means ‘settlement’ or ‘village.’

Jacques Cartier first heard it in reference to Quebec City, but soon it was used to describe the whole region. Upper Canada Parliamentarian Thomas D’Arcy McGee argued the adoption of Canada as the name for the country in 1865. And the name was officially adopted on July 1, 1867.

So, have you ever wondered what other names were being considered for this country?

Here are some of the names that were bested by the moniker ‘Canada.’

Acadia – Albertland – Albionara

Albona – Alexandrina – Aquilonia

Borealia – British North America – Brittanica

Cabotia – Canadensia – Colonia

Efisga – Hochelaga – Laurentia

Mesopelagia – New Albion – Niagarentia

Norland – Superior – Transatlantia

Transatlantica – Transylvania – Tuponia

Ursulia – Vesperia – Victorialand or Victorialia

Say, how does “Happy Efisga Day” sound?

Or “Happy Hochelaga Day!”

Of course, I like many of my friends still like to say “Happy Dominion Day,” but that’s an argument for another time….

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

6 Remarkable Desktop Wallpapers

You will want to get these wallpapers to adorn your desktop! Right click on the image you love and save – and enjoy! 

To see a greater selection of images, click here and go to bicycle wallpapers.

To see more on cycling, pedal through the By George Journal menu.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte

Cycle MORE (182 km)

For a few years now my friend Jeff Mills and I would talk about the opportunity of having a cycle route looping northern Lanark cycle routes to the western parts of Ottawa and Parliament Hill. It would traverse all the small towns, the farm fields, wooded lands, and the pathways along the Mississippi and Ottawa Rivers.

We have poured over maps. It was a source of conversation for too many nights. We even spoke to officials at the towns of Mississippi Mills and Carleton Place – and the City of Ottawa.

Then, last year, we got on our bikes and found the perfect loop.

Almonte / Carleton Place / along the Trans Canada Trail into Stittsville / Ottawa to Parliament Hill via the Ottawa River riverside trails in Gatineau… and then back along the Ottawa River / Kanata / Carp / Fitzroy Harbour / Galetta / and along the Ottawa Valley Rail Trail through Pakenham  to Almonte. It is a grand loop — two magnificent rivers, two unique provinces, two rail trails, and over 180 km of fun.

As we biked this wonderful route – we named it: the Mississippi & Ottawa Rivers Experience or MORE for short. It’s a great loop. We want to encourage everyone to cycle MORE.

  • Almonte Old Town Hall to the Ottawa Valley Rail Trail to the Carleton Place Junction (11 km)
  • L Coleman Street to proceed onto the Trans Canada Trail to Stittsville Main Street (22 km)
  • Proceed on Trans Canada Trail to north side of Robertson Road (9 km)
  • Sharp L onto Greenbelt Pathway West, north to Watts Creek Pathway (5 km)
  • R Watts Creek Pathway to become Trans Canada Trail to Moodie Drive (2 km)
  • Procced on Trans Canada Trail / Watts Creek Pathway to Carling Avenue (3 km)
  • Proceed through Andrew Haydon Park on Pathway to Trans Canada Trail that runs beside the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway (3 km)
  • Proceed along paved cycle path beside Macdonald Parkway to Island Parkway (4 km)
  • L onto Island Parkway Champlain Bridge to Ottawa River Pathway in Quebec (1 km)
  • R onto Ottawa River Pathway in Gatineau to the Canadian Museum of History (7 km)

  • Proceed on pathway onto Royal Alexandria Bridge across to Ontario, through Major’s Hill Park to the Bytown Locks (2 km)
  • Cross over the locks at the base of Parliament Hill and proceed west onto Trans Canada Trail pathway — from Parliament Hill locks along beside Macdonald Parkway to Andrew Hayden Park (15 km)
  • Ver R onto Carling Ave to Herzberg Road (6 km)
  • R onto Herzberg / L Leggett Dr / L on Terry Fox to Second Line (4.5 km)
  • R Second Line / L Old Carp Road and into Carp – to Carp Road corner (9 km)
  • R Carp Road through village of Carp to Thomas Dolan Parkway (6 km)
  • R Thomas Dolan Parkway to Woodkilton Road (6.5 km)
  • L Woodkilton Road to Galetta Sideroad (19 km)
  • L Galetta Sideroad / R Ferry Road / L Aylwin Road / L Canon Smith Dr to Fitzroy St (8 km)
  • R Fitzroy Street into Fitzroy Harbour / L on Harbour Street out to Galetta Sideroad (3 km)
  • R Galetta Sideroad through village of Galetta to Hwy 29 (15 km)
  • L Hwy 29 for a short distance / R Shaw Road to Ottawa Valley Rail Trail (1 km)
  • L Ottawa Valley Rail Trail to Pakenham crossing at Waba Road (6 km)
  • Proceed from Pakenham to Almonte Old Town Hall (14 km)

I promise in the next few weeks to publish photos and trail features and explain the excitement in cycling MORE.  This is the ultimate ride in our region.

To see more on cycling, pedal through the By George Journal menu.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte

 

In Justin Trudeau’s post-national state, there are no proud Canadians

The Niagara Independent, June 25, 2021 — Oh Canada, is there anything left of our country and its history for us to celebrate? Does it not seem that, in reading news headlines, Canadians’ new national sport is self-flagellation?

We now live in a country where our nation’s past is being removed from public squares and crated for “safe keeping.” It is acceptable to deface and topple the statues of the founding prime minister Sir John A. Macdonald and the country’s initial champion of public education Egerton Ryerson. It is empowering for many to argue that Canada Day must be cancelled and in its place we are all to mourn “the lives lost to the Canadian state – Indigenous lives, Black lives, migrant lives, women, trans and two-spirit lives.”

It appears from our country’s prime minister on down; many political leaders are abetting a narrative that casts Canada’s history in the most negative possible light. As Candice Malcolm of True North Media explained, “It is much more fashionable to condemn Canada as a uniquely terrible, systemically compromised failed state built by irredeemably horrendous leaders who committed unspeakable atrocities and crimes against humanity.”

Malcolm recently lamented, “The woke mob wants to erase our history, tear our country apart and cancel Canada Day but nobody is standing up to them…Baseless claims from the woke left are no longer being challenged. Instead, political and media leaders allow radical woke leftists to use Canada as a punching bag.”

And PM Justin Trudeau never misses an opportunity to virtue signal and incite social justice warriors. It is by design, his drive toward a post-national state – sans culture, sans institutions, sans history.

For years, our country’s prime minister has been ceaselessly denigrating Canadian historic accomplishments and institutions – including the legitimacy of Canada’s seat of government itself – to foster a culture of guilt and unworthiness. Of parliament, PM Trudeau stated: “There are many institutions that we have in this country, including the big building right across the street from us (Parliament Hill’s Centre Block) that has and is built around a system of colonialism, discrimination, of systemic racism in all our institutions.”

The prime minister’s reflections echo the woke world view that western culture is best summarized as a hierarchy of power with a shameful story of oppressors and oppressed – defined by skin colour, gender and sexual orientation.

It is the woke world view in the Canadian education system today that is indoctrinating young minds with a guilt-based, anti-Western narrative. It is also found in Canada’s bureaucracy, which has superimposed a race-based conflict narrative on all policy discussions of our country’s current affairs.

Back in 2019 the Trudeau government introduced “antiracism training” and in the recent 2021 federal budget there was a massive expansion of the race-based programming for all government employees. The training is grounded in “critical race theory,” which is an interpretation of history that positions Western society as intrinsically racist due to its alleged white supremacist thinking and policies.

Canadians are to come to understand that they are racist “settlers” in a land where they have no legitimate rights. The government’s training program instructs civil servants to question everything, including the very name of our country. According to the program, it is a fact that “this place we now call Canada” is but “a colonial settler society – a concept based on many myths, including European discovery and harmonious multiculturalism.”

Given this skewed historical interpretation of Canada, it should not be surprising that the call to cancel the country’s national day has traction among a certain portion of our society. The progressives’ claim is captured in a popular tweet that has been reposted ad nauseum with the hashtag #cancelCanadaDay: “Celebrating Canada Day is a celebration of First Nations dispossession, oppression and genocide. July 1st instead should be a day of mourning and remembrance of the evils of colonialism. People who celebrate occupations and genocide are misguided and shameful.”

The ultimate goal of the woke, progressive mindset is to tear down all structures of our Canadian society and shake the confidence of its people. It is to deny any hint of the country’s accomplishments based on the riches of our natural resources and an industrious people sharing a remarkable history of peace, order and good government.

As Candice Malcom lamented, there seems to be no political leader prepared to stand up to the woke mob – that is until this week.

As MPs were preparing to leave Ottawa for a summer of campaigning, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole addressed his caucus. His message contained a forcible defence of Canada and its history. In response to the progressive mob’s chant to cancel Canada Day, he asserted that “It’s time to build Canada up, not tear it down…the road to reconciliation, the road to equality, the road to inclusion, does not involve tearing Canada down.”

O’Toole broached the subject of recent residential school discoveries by describing them as “very troubling” and evidence of the “grave injustices” committed against Indigenous peoples. However, he rejected that this historic wrong should result in a rejection of Canada’s culture, its institutions and people’s inherited rights. He was adamant that it should not lead to a cancellation of Canada Day, nor to undermine the pride Canadians feel for their country and its history.

This message and O’Toole’s tone stands out in sharp contrast to the narrative being spun this week by PM Trudeau and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

O’Toole reasoned, “We are not a perfect country. No country is. There is no place on this planet whose history can withstand close scrutiny. But there is a difference between acknowledging where we’ve fallen short and always tearing the country down.”

He placed himself directly in front of the mob and the prime minister’s design for a post-national state. O’Toole spoke directly over the heads of the woke when he said, “As someone who served Canada and will soon ask for the trust to lead this country, I can’t stay silent when people want to cancel Canada Day. I am very proud to be Canadian and I know most people are as well.”

So, perhaps, there is something with this defiant retort to celebrate on this July 1st – oh Canada.

Chris George is an Ottawa-based government affairs advisor and wordsmith, president of CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. Contact: ChrisG.George@gmail.com

[Photo credit: The Canadian Press/Justin Lang — People celebrate Canada Day on Parliament Hill, July 1, 2018]

LINK: https://niagaraindependent.ca/there-are-no-proud-canadians-in-justin-trudeaus-post-national-state/

 

Go-To Websites for Cycling in Ontario

There are a number of excellent websites to reference if you are looking for new cycling adventures in Ontario.

Our favourite go-to site is Ontario By Bike.

Whether you are interested in meandering recreational trails, rugged mountain biking terrain or paved road riding, there are trail and route types suitable for any kind of rider. The cycling information and maps in this website will take you through some of the most scenic spots in the province. The resources throughout Ontario By Bike are invaluable!

Another great resource is the Cycle Ontario website. It has great tour information broken out into the regions of the province. There are great trail descriptions and maps.

There are also a number of blog entries that identify terrific rides:

Top Cycle Routes to Explore Ontario

Top 20 Rides in Ontario

Best Bike Rides in Ontario – 9 Picks

AllTrails: Best road biking trails in Ontario

And if you are traveling to eastern Ontario, the City of Ottawa has a good set of maps and information to plan your trip in and around the National Capital Region: Cycling in Ottawa.

To see more on cycling, pedal through the By George Journal menu.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte

 

Biking the rail trail from Arnprior to Sand Point (19 km return)

September 2020 — The George family had a wonderful cycle along the Ottawa River from Arnprior to Sand Point. Pictured here at our starting point on the old train bridge over the mighty Madawaska River.

There is much beauty along the Ottawa Valley Recreational Trail – and it gets interesting leaving Arnprior, where the weeping willows meet the pussy willows.

Here is the first sighting of the Ottawa River is as we enter Braeside…

… and DYK there is a beach in Braeside?! (FYI – the Ottawa River is cold.)

The trail is flat and solid crushed stone dust – and wide enough for two to travel side by side.

For about 2 kms, the trees thin and there are wonderful views along the river.

The Sand Point lighthouse is the destination point – a total of 9.5 km.

Here is the view of the Ottawa River looking down stream from the base of the Sand Point Lighthouse.

On the return trek, we are again greeted by the magnificent willows as we enter Arnprior.

Our final view before heading home was of the Madawaska River — photos taken from Arnprior’s old train bridge.

To see more on cycling, pedal through the By George Journal menu.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte

 

Stewiacke-Pictou Town NS Ride (110 km)

A few years back a bluenose friend, Dwight Isenor, and I started out from the mastodon in Stewiacke for a wonderful ride through Nova Scotia backroads to Pictou Town — a 110 km trek that took a better part of a leisurely day.

  • Mastadon L to Hwy 2 (650 m)
  • L Hwy 2 to Brookfield (15 km)

Crossing over the winding Stewiacke River with the tide coming in.

We saw the great mud flats of the Stewiacke.

We rolled through Brookfield – my wife`s hometown village and the place where our Family has so many special memories. (Dwight wanted to stop for a sticky bun from the Brookfield Bakery – but I forced him to press on.)

  • Proceed through Brookfield on Hwy 2 to Queen Street Truro (13 km)
  • R Queen Street to Salmon River Road (6 km)
  • R Salmon River Road to Valley / Hwy 4 (3.5 km)
  • R Hwy 4 to Mount Thom (22 km)
  • Proceed through Mount Thom to Central West River (16.5 km)

Here’s the Salmon River outside of Truro with the Fundy tide out. The river bed was nothing but one large mud flat!

Our first look at the Mount Thom hill. This road twists around – and look at the upper left of this photo to see the full extent of this winding climb.

We traveled by the the hills and forest along old hwy 4 to Pictou County.

  • At Central West River ver left onto Hwy 376
  • Hwy 376 to Pictou Town and the Trans Canada Trail (15 km)
  • R Trans Canada Trail to the Pictou Waterfront (18.5 km) 
  • Proceed to the Pictou Wharf for your salute! (200 m)

Our first sight of the water – the mouth of the West River, which empties into Pictou Bay.

We rode a trail along the Bay`s edge and this was the first sighting of Pictou Town – and onto the end of our ride – at the Pictou Wharf.

And here’s the Pictou Harbour mainstay — the Hector.

The Pictou Wharf salute! What a great ride!

To see more on cycling, pedal through the By George Journal menu.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte

The Top Canadian Cycle Dream Trips

Here are lists of the most spectacular rides in Canada as selected by avid Canuck cyclists…

6 Dream Rides in Canada ~ Bucket-list roads and trails in Canada you need to do

Mount Fromme, the North Shore in North Vancouver, B.C. — 1.85 km with 300 m descent

The Cabot Trail in Cape Breton, N.S. — 300 km with 3,400 m climbing

The Lakes and Rivers Route in Mont-Tremblant, Que. — 87 km with 768 m climbing

Kettle Valley Rail Trail in Penticton, B.C. — 342.2-km multi-day loop or a out-and-back options of either 92 km or 160 km (photo above)

Edith Cavell Road in Jasper, Alta. — 19.2 km with 722 m gain

Montana Mountain in Carcross, Yukon — 28 km with 1,400 m climb

SOURCE: https://cyclingmagazine.ca/sections/ridesevents/5-dream-rides-in-canada/

Go cycling in Canada on these 8 epic Canadian bike trails

Route Verte in Quebec

Did you know that you could cross La Belle Province all by bike? Quebec’s Route Verte is a 4,000-kilometre bike path network that goes from one end of the province to the other, making it one of the longest bike trails in Canada

Southeastern Waterfront Trail in Ontario

One of the ultimate bike trips in Ontario has to be the Southeastern Waterfront Trail. Get some incomparable views of the province’s Great Lake region at this 780-kilometre bike route, which follows the shores of Lake Ontario and starts at Niagara-on-the-Lake.

Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia

You can take an epic road trip to the Cabot Trail, but you can also take your bike. The 298-kilometre paved loop goes around part of Cape Breton Island. (Photo above.)

Confederation Trail on Prince Edward Island

If you’re looking for a relatively flat biking route, then the Confederation Trail on PEI might be the perfect cycling adventure.

Viking Trail in Newfoundland and Labrador

If you’re up for a challenge, this 489-kilometre route takes you along the rugged coast of Newfoundland and Labrador. It starts at Deer Lake, passes through the Gros Morne National Park, and continues to the northern tip of Newfoundland to L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site.

The Gulf Islands in British Columbia

The Gulf Islands are a group of islands that are located between Vancouver Island and the mainland.

Kettle Valley Railway Trail in British Columbia

The Kettle Valley Railway Trail extends from Hope to Castlegar in British Columbia’s beautiful Okanagan Valley, passing through Penticton and going close to Kelowna.

Ridge Road Heritage Trail in Yukon

This is the shortest bike trail on this list, measuring in at 33-kilometres. Enjoy some unforgettable cycling along the oldest road in the Yukon, which was built just after the gold rush.

SOURCE: https://www.skyscanner.ca/tips-and-inspiration/best-canadian-bike-trails

Bike Trips in Canada – 10 of the Best

Gulf Islands, BC biking – a fun way to explore the islands

Cycling the Gulf Islands is a treat. You have a number of islands to choose from, all with their own personalities. You need a week if you want to properly cycle all of them, even more if you want some side trips. (Download a full guide to cycling the Gulf Islands here.)

Kettle Valley Railway, BC – one of the best bike trips in Canada

The Kettle Valley Railway (KVR) is an abandoned railroad track that winds across the Okanagan and Similkameen region in southern BC. It offers over 800 km (497 mi) of mountain biking trails (as opposed to road biking). The 80 km section from Myra Canyon near Kelowna through to Penticton is one of the most popular.

Biking from Banff to Jasper – a standout bike trip in Canada

The 290 km bike ride between Banff and Jasper is one of the most impressive bike rides in the world. The route runs parallel to the Continental Divide so mountains are always in sight. For the experienced and fit cyclist, it offers challenging hills and epic downhill rides.

Niagara-on-the-Lake to Fort Erie bike ride

Niagara Falls, quiet riverside paths, museums, world-class wineries and an abundance of orchards guarantee that the cycling along the Niagara River Recreation Trail is anything but average.  Its 25 km one way to Niagara Falls and another 29 km to reach Fort Erie. You can actually cycle a 195 km loop and return to Niagara-on-the-Lake via Port Colborne, Thorold and Jordan.

Eastern Townships, Quebec – a top bike trip in Canada especially in fall

Within spitting distance of Montreal, Quebec’s Green Route travels through the Eastern Townships on a total of 225 km of signed trail and road. If you head out with just a couple of panniers, you have the flexibility to stay in some of the small towns before returning to your starting point. (Photo above.)

Le Petit Train du Nord in Quebec

For a superb three to four day bike ride choose the 200 km Le Petit Train du Nord in Quebec’s Laurentian region. For more information read: Biking Le Petit Train du Nord

Biking the Fundy Isles in New Brunswick

It’s great fun exploring the Fundy Isles by bike. There are three worth visiting- Grand Manan Island, the largest; Deer Island – the smallest and Campobello Island, where you’ll find the sprawling summer home of former US President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia – a difficult but one of the top bike trips in Canada

The Cabot Trail is a 300 km loop around the northern part of Cape Breton Island including Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Biking the length of Prince Edward Island

If you’re in shape you could in theory cycle the length of Prince Edward Island in a day – but who’d want to do that?  You’d miss all the things that make the island so special – beautiful beaches, quiet backroads, stops for scallop burgers and lobster rolls, friendly people and a laid-back vibe.

A bike ride on the Viking Trail in Newfoundland

The 600 km cycling trip up Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula is a fantastic bike ride but it’s a tough one. Allow 7 – 10 days on a route that primarily follows the rugged coast through a series of sparsely populated but picturesque fishing villages with names like Sally’s Cove, Cow Head and Brig Bay.

SOURCE:  https://hikebiketravel.com/10-of-the-best-bike-trips-in-canada/

 

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Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. And yes, Chris also would rather be cycling… #bikealmonte