Category Archives: Features

News, articles and opinion pieces

Maple Butter Tart Liqueur

Marie Porter is a cookbook author and active blogger from Hamilton. She is the “Evil Cake Overlord, All -Around Kitchen Badass!” who produces the entertaining CelebrationGeneration.com.

This is Marie Porter’s recipe for Maple Butter Tart Liqueur.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Dark Raisins
  • 2 Vanilla Beans
  • 3 Cups Decent Quality Vodka
  • 2 1/2 Cups Brown Sugar Packed
  • 1/2 Cup Maple Syrup
  • 1/2 Cup Water

Instructions

  1. Place raisins in a large, clean jar.
  2. Slice vanilla beans lengthwise, scoop the seeds out. Add beans and seeds to the jar, top with vodka, and shake well. Store in a cool, dark place for about 4-7 days, shaking daily.
  3. After a few days, taste. If the flavour is good and strong (it’ll likely be!), strain out raisins and vanilla, discard.* If you want more flavour, allow it to sit for another week or so, shaking daily.
  4. Combine brown sugar, maple syrup, and water in a pot. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until sugar is fully dissolved. Remove from heat, allow to cool.
  5. Combine infused vodka with maple-brown sugar syrup, stirring or shaking well to combine. Bottle in clean wine or liqueur bottles.
  6. After bottling, you should let it age for about a week in a cool place before drinking it – IF you have that kind of patience! Aging results in a smoother, more mellow flavor.

Notes

Saving a few vodka raisins to place in the liqueur bottle makes for a cute presentation idea.

By George originally came by this recipe in The Toronto Sun: Butter Tarts Recipes for the Quintessentially Canadian Dessert.

Here is the source page on the Celebration Generation Blog: Maple Butter Tart Liqueur

Here is Marie Porter’s recipe for Maple Butter Tarts and Gluten-Free Butter Tarts

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Almonte and Pakenham Bakeries are “Must-Stops”

A mere 45 minutes from Parliament Hill, there two bakeries that are “must-stops” for the butter tart aficionado.

On the main street of Almonte, Baker Bob’s is a traditional bakery; when you walk through the door it is like stepping back in time. The wooden floor, the smells, the baker’s smile… AND THE BUTTER TARTS. (There is nothing quite like Bob’s tarts. Their insides are painfully sweet and verrrry running. It’s kinda like biting into sugary molten lava.)

The second bakery in Mississippi Mills is found on the main street of Pakenham. The Pakenham General Store has a wonderful air about it. The establishment is the oldest “continuously operating” general store in Canada.

It’s claim to fame is its sticky buns and its tarts. The ladies at the store bake everything fresh and produce a variety of tarts, including no-raisin, raisin, pecan — and maple tarts. These butter tarts have a more-solid inside so when you bite into one you are not licking the syrup off your chin.

(So, now you have two destinations for a wonderful countryside ride from the bustle of Ottawa.) 

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Wellington County Butter Tarts

Wellington County proclaims it is home to a provincially recognized Butter Tart Champion (?!). The County has excellent bakeries, farm markets and restaurants and it is actively promoting a ramble through the countryside to discover a “favourite butter tart.”

In Wellington County there are 13 stops that feature butter tarts. From Belwood Country Market to Strom’s Farm south of Guelph, there is a great map and wonderful write ups of the bakeries: Wellington County Butter Tarts.

Make a stop into Misty Meadows Market in Conn

Here is must-stop: Thatcher Farms Butcher Shop, Makery and Farm Market outside of Guelph

In previous years, Wellington County also has hosted an annual Butter Tarts and Buggies Tour. Check out this event – and let’s hope in the future it will resume.

And about the County’s claim of having the champion butter tart baker….

   “Helen Moffat has been entering (and winning) the butter tart competition at the Drayton Fair for 48 years. But this past fall, she decided to submit her prize-winning tarts to a new competition, which would make her eligible for the second annual provincial butter tart competition hosted by the OAAS (Ontario Association of Agricultural Societies). Moffat swept the competition at Drayton and then moved on to districts (there are 15 OAAS districts in Ontario) to face off against other local winners.’ In February 2019 she was crowned the grand champion of the OAAS for her butter tart recipe.”

   ‘She’s not revealing the secret to her prize-winning ways any time soon. Much to her family’s chagrin, she doesn’t have a recipe to pass down. “I eyeball it, I never measure anything. That’s just the way I’ve done it for years,” she says.’

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The (Infamous) Butter Tart Tour

Yes, you can find everything sweet and delicious on Ontario’s infamous Butter Tart Tour. For example, go ahead and order a decadent slice of butter tart pie from The Spot in Mount Forest.

Spread across the Kawartha Lakes — a scenic region of forests, hills and shining waterways about two hours northeast of Toronto — this tour spans the heart of the province’s cottage country. The Butter Tart Tour has grown to over 50 locations across Northumberland County, Peterborough County, the City of Peterborough, and Kawartha Lakes.

You can walk, bike and drive along four suggested routes — and you can even boat to 19 spots located along the Trent-Severn Waterway!

There is a resourceful website for your family and friends to plan your tour(s): Butter Tart Tour. You can find this tour on social media, including a Facebook Page: Kawarthas Butter Tart Tour.

The most recent 1st place winner of the tour’s annual taste off is The Pastry Peddler in Millbrook. Learn more about this delectable spot here: The Pastry Peddler

Also, if you are planning to head out on a trek along one of the routes, you will be interested to read an entertaining article written for the WestJet tourism magazine. Check out the photos in this piece: Kawarthas Northumberland Butter Tart Tour

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

The Best Butter Tart Festival

The Best Butter Tart Festival is Canada’s original and largest butter tart festival. It is an annual event in Ontario’s butter tart heartland of Midland. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 festival was cancelled, however the date for next year’s fun is June 12, 2021.

At the inaugural festival in June 2013, the bakers sold out of the 10,000 butter tarts available for sale by 11 a.m.  The number of butter tarts available for sale is increasing each year. In the last few years there has been between 150,000 to 200,000 butter tarts available! In 2019, the festival had a record 65,000 butter tart lovers in attendance. Find out more information here: Best Butter Tart Festival

The reigning champion of the festival contest is from Alliston. The Carriage House Bakery was recognized as the “Best In Show” and the bakery won in the category “Traditional: Professional Bakers.” Read more on this victory: Alliston bakery wins best butter tart, business has never been sweeter

BTW – you can find recent news, photos and comments on the festival on the I Love Butter Tarts Facebook Page.

 

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Butter Tart Daydreams II

This is another By George original digital art piece of our favourite  daydreams…

(Seriously, doesn’t looking at this make your mouth water and your teeth ache?)   

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The core beliefs and aspirations of George Soros (Part 2)

The Niagara Independent, July 17, 2020 — George Soros 4-part series reviews his life and achievements, beliefs and goals, and his ties and influence in Canada.

What are George Soros’ core philosophical beliefs; what are the man’s mental constructs that motivate and drive him? What is Soros’ view of the world and his role within the global community? To address these questions is to begin to better understand Soros and the influence he wields.

George Soros’s thought processes revolve around the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper and his classic work The Open Society and Its Enemy. Soros studied under Popper at the London School of Economics and it is not surprising that the professor’s teachings resonated with the young Soros, who had survived wartime Hungary. Soros became attached to the theory of “open societies,” that would guarantee and protect rational exchange where, alternatively, closed societies coerced people to submit to political authority.

Soros’ early notions of open societies evolved with his life experiences and, today, he conveniently smudges the purer objectives of Popper’s desired society. In a 2011 essay on the subject, Soros explains what he sees as the essential adjunct to his original teachings. He writes, “If thinking has a manipulative function as well as a cognitive one, then it may not be necessary to gain a better understanding of reality in order to obtain the laws one wants. There is a shortcut: ‘spinning’ arguments and manipulating public opinion to get the desired results. Today our political discourse is primarily concerned with getting elected and staying in power.” Here we see Soros appreciates the utility of spinning arguments; ends will justify means.

Another key influencer in Soros’s world view was his mentor Maurice Strong. This Canadian oil businessman and diplomat is arguably the greatest global visionary of the modern, post-World Wars era. He is recognized as a founder of the international environmental movement. Involved from the early 1970s in the United Nations (U.N.) bureaucracy, Strong’s self-promoted mission was to empower the U.N. as the global authority that would manage a new era of global governance through three of its international organizations: the World Wildlife Fund, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and the World Resources Institute. Strong was bent on establishing a new world order with an overseeing group of leaders within the U.N., stating: “In order to save the planet, the group decides: Isn’t the only hope for the planet that the industrialized civilizations collapse? Isn’t it our responsibility to bring this about? This group of world leaders forms a secret society to bring about an economic collapse.”

Soros was drawn to Strong’s vision of a new world order and his machinations for the U.N.  For decades, the two men collaborated and directed the U.N. non-governmental organizations in advancing the goals of a One World Government. Before Maurice Strong’s death in 2015, American political commentator Glen Beck assessed their working partnership, “Maurice Strong has almost as much impact on average Americans as the air that they breathe… One World Government begins and ends with Maurice Strong. George Soros is merely the financier.”

Beck has downplayed the role of “the financier,” yet Soros has proven dominant in his own right. He has effectively guided his own Open Society Foundations (OSF) grant network to champion the One World Government idea. And through the last 30 years, George Soros has published 14 books and numerous print articles that define his principles of internationalism. He repeatedly espouses that the creation of a global open society is the only way mankind can succeed against today’s formidable world challenges of climate change and nuclear proliferation. One can hear echoes of both Popper and Strong.

The multi-billion dollar OSF is the strong arm of Sorus’ global activism. In a 2017 essay that reveals private information leaked from Soros’ papers, City Journal contributing editor Stefan Kanfer exposes the underbelly of the OSF involvement in Syria. Kanfer writes, “Underneath its lofty rhetoric, the organization was clearly devoted to the eradication of national sovereignty. A key Open Society paper, hacked in its entirety, described the Syrian refugee crisis as an opportunity to “shape conversations about rethinking migrations governance.” Translation: use agitprop to flood Europe and the U.S. with evacuees (among them some probable terrorists); make the old borders and institutions irrelevant; and, in the process, create a world liberated from the restraints of constitutionalism, American exceptionalism, free-market capitalism, and other obsolete isms.”

Another illustrative example of Soros financing social discord can be found with Extinction Rebellion (XR), a U.K.-based, global environmental movement with a publicly stated aim of using nonviolent civil disobedience to prompt action on climate change. However, in an internal briefing memo to XR’s members, it is evident that the organization’s mission is not so well-intentioned. This is verbatim from the XR memo:

  1. To show to radical people (and internationally) that it is possible to have an “impossible” plan and carry out a rebellion – however small (or large!) and thus increase the “overton window” of acceptable discourse on the ecological crisis.
  2. To create a national conversation about the ecological crisis and climate breakdown – including that our families/communities/society and state are facing existential threat. This includes to discuss our demands with the government/ political parties (see below). Also to support further uprisings to demand change off the back of the door we open.
  3. To build structure, community and test prototypes in preparation for the coming structural collapse of the regimes of western “democracies” – now seen as inevitable due to stored up crisis. Thus preparing a foundation to transform society and resist fascism / other extremes. This includes creating Rising from the Wreckage- a Citizens Assembly based on sortation.

Supported in part by OSF funds, XR last year had more than one million pounds in its war chest.

The Capital Research Center is an American organization examining how foundations, charities, and other nonprofits spend money and get involved in politics and advocacy. Shane Devine recently wrote for the Centre an expose on George Soros in which he comments, “Soros is honest about who he is, repeatedly calling himself a selfish man, who sought money and recognition throughout his life to satisfy his large ego. But he argues that this selfishness was ultimately good, since he was able to cultivate it into a moral force through philanthropy.”

In a 2018 New York Times interview, Soros himself explains his ideological approach to world matters, “My ideology is nonideological. I’m in the club of non-clubs.” But surely George Soros jests. His intellectual influences tell us otherwise. The modus operandi of the hundreds of groups around the world financed by the OSF tell us otherwise. George Soros is a man with the design for this world – and every country, including Canada, factors into his plan for One World Government.

Chris George is an Ottawa-based government affairs advisor and wordsmith, president of CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. Contact: ChrisG.George@gmail.com

LINK: https://niagaraindependent.ca/the-core-beliefs-and-aspirations-of-george-soros-part-2/

Photo Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The Bee Hive Corn Syrup Recipe

Beehive Corn Syrup had its own recipe for Butter Tarts on the back label of its golden product. Here it is in all its simplicity.

Ingredients 
2 eggs
1 Cup Beehive Corn Syrup
1 Cup Sugar
1/4 Cup Butter (melted)
1 teasp. Vanilla
1 Cup raisins (and I would soak them in water first for 1 hour to soften them)
24 3″ tart shells (or 48 mini shells)

Directions 
In a bowl beat eggs lightly with a fork
Add corn syrup, sugar, melted butter and vanilla
Stir until mixed
Spoon raisins into shells pour syrup mixture over the raisins two thirds full
Bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Bacon Butter Tarts

By George underlined for future reference one of the 26 butter tart creations found in The Great Canadian CookbookBacon Butter Tarts!  This is a must-bake.  Here is the recipe:

Ingredients 

Premade pastry, cut into 3 1/2-inch circles

5 slices bacon, cooked until crispy and chopped

¼ cup soft butter

½ cup lightly packed brown sugar

1 cup corn syrup

¼ tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla

Directions 

1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.

2. Line 18 medium sized muffin tins with the pastry. Do not prick.

3. In bowl, combine butter and brown sugar. Stir in corn syrup, salt and vanilla. Combine until just blended.

4. Arrange cooked bacon in the shells.

5. Spoon mixture into unbaked tart shells filling each to about 2/3 full.

6. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes. Do not allow filling to bubble over.

Prep time – 10 minutes; total time – 25 minutes; and, makes 18 servings.

The Food Network has a video to guide you through the baking process.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Butter Tart Recipes from The Great Canadian Cookbook

By George has found the website for those who wish to venture beyond the traditional tart and make a butter tart creation. In The Great Canadian Cookbook there are 26 recipes from butter tart squares to pinwheels. There are tarts with pecans and chocolate and maple.

We saw coffee cake, cinnamon buns, and an interesting cheese cake recipe.

We also saw a baklava butter tart bake and a receipt for butter tart ice cream.

There’s everything – including a traditional Waterloo County Butter Tart recipe.

The cookbook introduces the butter tart section with the following description:

Known around the world as a uniquely Canadian dessert, butter tarts are one of the tastiest things to come out of the True North. Nothing beats the flaky pastry filled with a perfectly sticky-sweet centre. Whether you prefer them plain, studded with raisins or turned into a cheesecake, we’ve got 26 recipes to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Enjoy reading through and baking these fun recipes!

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

It’s the all-important question: raisins or no-raisins

By George is celebrating July as the “Butter Tart Month.”

We are having a sweet time, but there is one piece of serious business we wish to clear up with our followers. It’s the all-important question for all butter tart lovers:

“Does the ultimate butter tart contain raisins?”

Mid-way through our By George survey the results are inconclusive:

Raisin 47 %

No-Raisins 39%

Other 14%

(With respect to the “other” responses, some people said “both” or “neither” and some answered pecans or currants.)

If you have not done so already, please register your opinion by emailing us at chrisg.george@gmail.com or visit the By George Facebook page and leave us a message.

Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

An apology for adding raisins

Canadians receive long-awaited apology from person who first added raisins to butter tarts

Pastry connoisseurs were shocked this morning when 98-year-old Rosie Vasco, the first person to publish a butter tart recipe that inexplicably called for raisins, issued a long-awaited public apology for desecrating one of Canada’s most beloved baked goods.

“My sincere apologies to anyone who has ever innocently bitten into a butter tart, unaware that it is filled with raisins,” Vasco said in a press conference from her nursing home. “I have spent my life haunted by guilt for the undue anguish my recipe has caused the bake sale community.”

The apology had special significance to Jeanie McLean, great-granddaughter of butter tart inventor Bertha McLean.

At her home in Barrie, Ontario, Jeanie flips through a scrapbook filled with pictures of butter tarts. She stops on a worn page from a 1942 issue of Chatelaine and her eyes instantly well with tears.

“This is it. The first published butter tart recipe to include raisins,” McLean says. “It’s hard for me to look at. Dad says it’s what sent Grannie to her grave.”

In 2000, the year the butter tart celebrated its centennial, McLean organized a petition calling for an apology from the author of Chatelaine‘s “tart sacrilege.”

More than 850,000 Canadians signed the petition, demanding reparations for the damage the highly controversial dried fruit had caused to the reputation of the nationally acclaimed dessert.

One of the signatories was Gordie Beynon, then 29, who says his father’s homemade butter tarts used to be his favourite treat.

“While visiting Dad in the hospital, I noticed the cafeteria sold butter tarts. I bought one thinking it would comfort him,” Beynon said. “He took one bite, whispered ‘RAISINS,’ and slipped into a coma he never came out of.”

Beynon added, “To be fair, “Raisins” was also the name of his beloved childhood toboggan, so I’m not sure what he meant.”

Vasco said it took her 17 years to respond to the petition due to a constant stream of threats.

“People have called me a grape murderer. They’ve mailed me Glosette Raisins boxes filled with chocolate-covered flies,” she said. “In 1987 someone broke into my house and left a beheaded California Raisins doll in my bed. They weren’t sure where its neck started, so they just left its arms and legs.”

Vasco says she’s apologizing now to “make amends with God.”

“My pastor told me raisins are the husks of grapes who have gone to hell.”

However, McLean says forgiveness will take time.

“I’m still too scared to buy unmarked tarts at farmers markets. I will not rest until every tart is pure and safe.”

(Yes, this is Canadian humour written by Laura Salvas and published by CBC Comedy. Go to the original post here.)

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

An Award-Winning Butter Tart Recipe

“Butter tarts are a Canadian tradition. Waaaay back in the 1970s, a national contest here in Canada concluded that these butter tarts, originating from Wilkie’s Bakery in Orillia, Ontario, were the best. I certainly think so and it’s the only recipe I use. Add a sprinkle of toasted walnuts when you add the raisins, if you wish, or use only walnuts if you don’t like raisins.”

Lennie L as posted on Food.com

INGREDIENTS

pie pastry (enough to fill 16 muffin cups, your own or from a mix)

½ cup cup raisins

1⁄4 cup soft butter

1⁄4 cup packed brown sugar

1 pinch salt

1⁄2 cup corn syrup

1 egg, lightly beaten

1⁄2 teaspoon vanilla

DIRECTIONS

Prepare muffin pans by rolling out pie dough and cutting 4-inch (approx) circles; fit dough circles into muffin cups; set aside in fridge until ready to fill.

In a small bowl, place raisins and cover with hot tap water; let stand on the counter for 30 minutes.

In a large bowl, using a wooden spoon, mix together the soft butter, brown sugar, salt and corn syrup; stir well until sugar is dissolved and butter is creamed.

Add egg and vanilla and mix well.

Drain raisins.

Retrieve tart shells and divide raisins equally into all shells; then divide butter mixture into all tarts.

Bake at 400F for 15-20 minutes; filling will be lightly browned but still bubbling.

Canadians fall into two camps about butter tarts and are quite loyal to their favourite type: runny or firm.

I like runny– the type that dribbles when you bite into one; if you like firm, bake them for the full 20 minutes, even adding another minute or two if you wish.

Let cooked butter tarts cool in pans for 10 minutes after removing from oven; then remove and place on racks until completely cool.

Serves 16

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Introducing George Soros (Part 1)

The Niagara Independent, July 10, 2020 — George Soros 4-part series reviews his life and achievements, beliefs and goals, and his ties and influence in Canada.

Who exactly is George Soros? Is he a billionaire investor and philanthropist or a Machiavellian globalist bent on creating discord? Soros’ multi-million dollar donations to political causes has had direct influence on the outcomes of political battles and on elections around the world, including in Canada. So, what are the beliefs, aspirations, and goals of this man?

According to Forbes magazine, in 2018 George Soros was the 29th richest person in the world and the richest hedge-fund manager with a net worth of over $25 billion U.S. That same year the British news organization Financial Times named Soros “Person of the Year,” describing him as “a standard bearer for liberal democracy, an idea under siege from populists.” Next month, when Soros will turn 90-years young, it is expected he will be adorned and feted for his leadership in advancing global causes. Bottom line: George Soros has a lot of money and is an influential force on the world stage.

Soros injecting himself into current affairs as a mega-donor for progressive movements around the globe has expectedly created his detractors, many fueling conspiracy theories about the man and his intentions. Veronika Bondarenko, reported in Business Insider that “For two decades, some have seen Soros as a kind of puppet master secretly controlling the global economy and politics.” Dubbed in the media as the “Connoisseur of Chaos,” he has been accused of being the sultan of Antifa — hiring protesters, renting buses, and even stashing piles of bricks to be hurled at police and through glass storefronts. Currently there is a campaign urging international authorities to “investigate George Soros for funding domestic terrorism and his decades-long corruption.”

Most recently, Soros made headlines with his private dinner speech to elite business leaders at the annual 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. He unloaded on U.S. President Donald Trump, forecasting in the upcoming elections, “He will fail!” Soros claims the President is “a con man and a narcissist, who wants the world to revolve around him… This has turned his narcissism into a malignant disease.” A stinging condemnation, but not unexpected by the U.S. Democratic Party’s most affluent donor. Still, to understand Soros’ bravado, one must first appreciate his life story.

George Soros was born Gyorgy Schwartz into a prosperous upper-middle class, non-observant Jewish family residing in Budapest Hungary. Experiencing the anti-Semitic prejudices rising from Nazism in 1930s Europe, the family changed its name to a Hungarian surname. Then at 13, the young Soros witnessed Nazi-Germany occupy his country and begin to strip Hungarian Jews of their rights. He recounts an indelible life lesson delivered by his father at the time of the Nazi invasion; his father instructed the family: “This is an emergency. If we remain law-abiding citizens and continue our current existence, we are going to perish.” The family did what it could – including having George sent from his family home to live with a government official – and they managed to survive the brutality of Nazi rule where half a million Hungarian Jews were sent to death camps.

Soros attended the London School of Economics where he earned a masters degree in philosophy. He ventured to the U.S. to begin a business career in various merchant banks. In 1973, at age 43, Soros established his own hedge fund Quantum Fund, which has generated more than $40 billion through four decades of operation (the fund made $5.5 billion in 2013 alone).

Soros’ meteoric hedge fund career included some notorious dealings. In 1992, Soros was named “The Man Who Broke the Bank of England” because of his short sale of $10 billion U.S. worth of pounds sterling, which made him a tidy $1 billion profit on the U.K.’s infamous Black Wednesday. Similarly, in 1996 he profited from a Finnish financial crisis; and in 1997 he profited from the Asian financial crisis.

Repeatedly, Soros made cash from market chaos. In fact, Soros’ impact on the markets prompted Nobel-prize winning American economist Paul Krugman in 1999 to observe:  “Nobody who has read a business magazine in the last few years can be unaware that these days there really are investors who not only move money in anticipation of a currency crisis, but actually do their best to trigger that crisis for fun and profit. These new actors on the scene do not yet have a standard name; my proposed term is “Soroi.”

Soros (and many others) has attributed his success in the stock markets to the “Theory of Reflexivity” – developed by Soros himself. In simple terms, this theory is used to decipher asset bubbles, market value of securities, and value discrepancies to short and swap stocks. Soros reads the boom and bust cycles of the market and anticipates investors’ trading patterns. The more volatile the markets, the greater the opportunity to cash in.

Through his life, George Soros’ money has funded groups that advanced his beliefs. In 2018, he donated more than $32 billion to the Open Society Foundations (OSF), an umbrella institute Soros himself had created in 1993 to help fund groups working for “justice, democratic governance, and human rights.” On its website, the OSF states it “works to build vibrant and tolerant democracies whose governments are accountable to their citizens. To achieve its mission, OSF seeks to shape public policies that assure greater fairness in political, legal, and economic systems and safeguard fundamental rights….” Today OSF is funding a global web of activity in 60 countries, giving an average of $600 million a year to progressive causes.

One core recipient of OSF funding is the Tides Foundation and Tides Centres, which in turn directly and indirectly fund World Wildlife Fund, The Nature Conservancy, the Sierra Club, the American Civil Liberties Union, and a multitude of grant-making philanthropic foundations across North America. In the U.S., the Tides Foundation is a registered charity organization, fostering special interest groups, advancing progressive policy — and distributing money from anonymous donors to liberal causes and political campaigns.

The primary beneficiary of Soros and the OSF’s political agenda in the U.S. has been the Democratic Party. Soros’ generosity to the Party is legendry. In 2004, Soros spent more than $25 million to support 527 groups to defeat George W. Bush. In the 2016 presidential election, he spent more than $20 million on Democrats’ Political Action Committees (PAC) and doled out $8 million on a pro-Hillary Clinton super PAC. In Fall 2019, Soros donated $5.1 million seed money to create his own Democracy PAC. Then in the first three months of 2020, Soros has pumped $28.3 million into Democratic groups for the 2020 election, including $5 million to pro-Biden Priorities USA PAC. The flow of money is constant, the well deep; Soros is intent that U.S. President Trump does indeed fail.

George Soros is an incredible man. He survived an incredible childhood, accomplished incredible financial success and is now wielding incredible influence. Canadians need to know more about Soros and the shadows he casts across our country.

Chris George is an Ottawa-based government affairs advisor and wordsmith, president of CG&A COMMUNICATIONS. Contact: ChrisG.George@gmail.com

LINK: https://niagaraindependent.ca/introducing-george-soros-part-1/

Photo Credit: Georg Hochmuth/AFP/Getty Images

Elizabeth Baird’s Butter Tart Recipe

Here is the classic butter tart recipe by renowned Canadian cook Elizabeth Baird. This recipe was found in the blog posts of the Tasting Table.

As a side note, Mrs. Baird was for decades the food editor of Canadian Living. You will find that her recipe differs from the recipe found in that magazine.

Prep Time: 20 minutes, plus chilling time

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes, plus chilling time

Yield: 12 tarts

 

INGREDIENTS

For the Pastry:

1½ cups all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ cup cold butter, cubed

¼ cup cold lard, cubed (or substitute butter)

1 large egg yolk

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Ice water

 

For the Filling:

½ cup packed light brown sugar

½ cup corn syrup

1 large, room-temperature egg

2 tablespoons very soft butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Pinch of salt

⅓ cup currants, sultana raisins, chopped walnuts or pecan halves

 

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make the pastry: In a large bowl, combine the flour and salt. Use a pastry blender to cut in the butter and lard until the mixture is in very fine crumbs. In a 1-cup measuring cup, use a small whisk or fork to combine the egg yolk, lemon juice and enough ice water to come to ⅓ cup. Gradually drizzle over the flour mixture, stirring briskly with a fork until the pastry holds together. You may need to add a little more ice water to gather up the last of the dry bits. Press into a disc, and wrap and chill until firm. Let stand at room temperature to soften a little before rolling.
  2. Make the filling: Preheat the oven to 450°. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, syrup, egg, butter, vanilla, lemon juice and salt until smooth.
  3. On a floured surface, roll out pastry to a ⅛-inch thickness. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter, cut out 12 circles, rerolling scraps if necessary. Fit into muffin cups. Divide the currants among the pastry shells. Spoon the filling over the currants until three-quarters full.
  4. Bake in the bottom third of the oven for about 12 minutes, or until filling is puffed and bubbly and pastry is golden. Let stand on a rack for a minute; immediately run a metal spatula around tarts to loosen. Carefully slide the spatula under the tarts and lift out to cool on a rack. The baker gets to eat all the tarts that break in transit, or give them as a reward to favourite people.
  5. You can freeze them for a month, or store in fridge for up to a week. Warm to serve.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Butter Tart Daydreams

The inspiration for this By George original digital art piece is (can you guess?) our favourite  daydreams…

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Kids and Butter Tarts — a very happy combination

Back before the coronavirus pandemic shut everything down in our country, the folks in Vaughan Ontario got to celebrate their first Butter Tart Festival.

Lisa Queen of YorkRegion.com and photographer Steve Somerville featured kids’ reactions to eating tarts in this delightful article: ‘Yummy’: 5 kids serve up 5 thoughts on butter tarts at Vaughan festival.

This is priceless…

Vanessa Flamminio, 9, of Maple: “It’s yummy. They’re really good.”

For the record, Vanessa: No raisins

Ana Maria Mallinos, 14, from Stouffville: “Definitely the goo. I like it, yeah. I love them.”

Ana Maria: No raisins

Tristan Pesci, 10, of Maple: “It’s sweet and then you get the taste of the crust. It’s one of my favourites.”

Tristan: No raisins

Mia Molella, 8, of Schomberg: “I just like the taste.”

Mia: No raisins

Gabriel Iorfida, 6, from Richmond Hill: “They’re really, really good.”

Gabriel: No raisins

By George thanks to Lisa Queen and Steve Somerville who captured these reactions. You can see the full article clicking here.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

An artist’s rendering… delicious!

Brooke Cormier is a 26-year-old Canadian artist who has been pursuing her art professionally since 2016.

In the summer of 2017, Brooke created a delicious masterpiece, a 24” x 24” acrylic on canvass entitled “Canadian Butter Tarts.”  She tells us “these butter tarts were purchased from a bakery in Minden, Ontario and are frequently consumed by the artist and her family.”

As part of her own Canada 150 Food Series, Brooke produced a video that all tart aficionados will find interesting: Canadian Butter Tart Time Lapse.

Enjoy her video. Then enjoy visiting her gallery here: brookecormier.com.

(BTW – you can purchase a print of Brooke’s sweet masterpiece. Wouldn’t this look perfect on your kitchen wall?)

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

2020 Title Holder for Best Tart is From the Ottawa Valley

This year, the Ottawa Valley can boast having the 2020 Tart Queen (as well as the runner-up queen).  Derek Dunn reports in an Arnprior Chronicle-Guide news article of February 24, 2020.

“Two bakers from just outside Arnprior have won first and second place in the butter tart category at a convention in Toronto.

“Marilyn Misener and her friend Nordella Zimmerling of McNab/Braeside township took home the top ribbon and runner up, respectively, at the Ontario Association of Agricultural Society gala. Misener won the right to submit at the provincial level after winning at the Carp Fair; Zimmerling won at Arnprior’s….

“Judges at the convention blind tasted from the association’s 200 submissions before declaring the winners. They evaluated appearance, including crust and filling, texture, even the folds (preferably none) in the pastry.

Here is the key take away from this story of success.

The two are on the same side on the eternal debate between including or excluding raisins. No raisins!” both said, vehemently.”

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Mom, Tarts, and Life Lessons

Jessica Outram is a very creative school educator. Jessica is a playwright, director, actor, singer, publisher, as well as a poet. She is a member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada. In June 2019, she was appointed the Poet Laureate for Cobourg Ontario.

Jessica writes a delightful blog called Sunshine in a Jar and a few years ago wrote a wonderful piece: Meet Mom and Her Homemade Butter Tarts. Here is an exceptional extract from Jessica’s post about her Mother.

Five Things I’ve Learned from Mom and Her Tarts

  1. Heart: Mom makes tarts to show her love. (She doesn’t even eat the tarts!) The butter tarts are a sign of her generosity, talent, and kindness. She enjoys making the people around her happy. Mom teaches me the importance of putting heart at the centre, of giving our best to others, of creating something excellent to spread joy and express gratitude.
  2. Attention to Detail: Mom attends to perfecting each step in the tart making process. She inspects everything along the way, reflecting on how to make it better. By attending to every small detail, her tarts are absolute perfection each and every time she bakes them. Mom teaches me the importance of being methodical, following a plan, adjusting the plan when needed, and learning from the plan as time passes.
  3. Community: Mom uses tarts to bring people together. From family and friends to community groups to passersby, mom creates a sense of belonging by giving away butter tarts. Mom teaches me how to connect with others through generosity and to give the most to the people who are closest and part of our every day. It’s important to use our skills and talents in the service of building community and belonging.
  4. Practice: Mom worked hard to become an amazing cook and baker. She asked for help when she needed it. She utilized the lessons from her teachers. Mom teaches me that if we practice something, we will improve. If we practice it long enough, we can become experts. She chose to perfect her butter tart making not because it was her favourite thing to bake, but because of the joy the tarts brought others. Every year Mom and Dad continue to adjust the butter tart baking process to improve efficiency and excellence.
  5. Embrace the Crown: Mom has earned her crown as Queen of Tarts and she wears it with pride. It’s important to celebrate our achievements and to accept the compliments of others. Mom teaches me to take pride in my creations, to make space for others to celebrate, and to happily wear a crown when it’s been earned.

(BTW – For the record, Mom Outram uses raisins!) 

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.