Tag Archives: Canadian

Elizabeth Baird’s Butter Tart Recipe

Here is the classic butter tart recipe by renowned Canadian cook Elizabeth Baird. This recipe was found in the blog posts of the Tasting Table.

As a side note, Mrs. Baird was for decades the food editor of Canadian Living. You will find that her recipe differs from the recipe found in that magazine.

Prep Time: 20 minutes, plus chilling time

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes, plus chilling time

Yield: 12 tarts

 

INGREDIENTS

For the Pastry:

1½ cups all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ cup cold butter, cubed

¼ cup cold lard, cubed (or substitute butter)

1 large egg yolk

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Ice water

 

For the Filling:

½ cup packed light brown sugar

½ cup corn syrup

1 large, room-temperature egg

2 tablespoons very soft butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Pinch of salt

⅓ cup currants, sultana raisins, chopped walnuts or pecan halves

 

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make the pastry: In a large bowl, combine the flour and salt. Use a pastry blender to cut in the butter and lard until the mixture is in very fine crumbs. In a 1-cup measuring cup, use a small whisk or fork to combine the egg yolk, lemon juice and enough ice water to come to ⅓ cup. Gradually drizzle over the flour mixture, stirring briskly with a fork until the pastry holds together. You may need to add a little more ice water to gather up the last of the dry bits. Press into a disc, and wrap and chill until firm. Let stand at room temperature to soften a little before rolling.
  2. Make the filling: Preheat the oven to 450°. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, syrup, egg, butter, vanilla, lemon juice and salt until smooth.
  3. On a floured surface, roll out pastry to a ⅛-inch thickness. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter, cut out 12 circles, rerolling scraps if necessary. Fit into muffin cups. Divide the currants among the pastry shells. Spoon the filling over the currants until three-quarters full.
  4. Bake in the bottom third of the oven for about 12 minutes, or until filling is puffed and bubbly and pastry is golden. Let stand on a rack for a minute; immediately run a metal spatula around tarts to loosen. Carefully slide the spatula under the tarts and lift out to cool on a rack. The baker gets to eat all the tarts that break in transit, or give them as a reward to favourite people.
  5. You can freeze them for a month, or store in fridge for up to a week. Warm to serve.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Butter Tart Daydreams

The inspiration for this By George original digital art piece is (can you guess?) our favourite  daydreams…

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Kids and Butter Tarts — a very happy combination

Back before the coronavirus pandemic shut everything down in our country, the folks in Vaughan Ontario got to celebrate their first Butter Tart Festival.

Lisa Queen of YorkRegion.com and photographer Steve Somerville featured kids’ reactions to eating tarts in this delightful article: ‘Yummy’: 5 kids serve up 5 thoughts on butter tarts at Vaughan festival.

This is priceless…

Vanessa Flamminio, 9, of Maple: “It’s yummy. They’re really good.”

For the record, Vanessa: No raisins

Ana Maria Mallinos, 14, from Stouffville: “Definitely the goo. I like it, yeah. I love them.”

Ana Maria: No raisins

Tristan Pesci, 10, of Maple: “It’s sweet and then you get the taste of the crust. It’s one of my favourites.”

Tristan: No raisins

Mia Molella, 8, of Schomberg: “I just like the taste.”

Mia: No raisins

Gabriel Iorfida, 6, from Richmond Hill: “They’re really, really good.”

Gabriel: No raisins

By George thanks to Lisa Queen and Steve Somerville who captured these reactions. You can see the full article clicking here.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

An artist’s rendering… delicious!

Brooke Cormier is a 26-year-old Canadian artist who has been pursuing her art professionally since 2016.

In the summer of 2017, Brooke created a delicious masterpiece, a 24” x 24” acrylic on canvass entitled “Canadian Butter Tarts.”  She tells us “these butter tarts were purchased from a bakery in Minden, Ontario and are frequently consumed by the artist and her family.”

As part of her own Canada 150 Food Series, Brooke produced a video that all tart aficionados will find interesting: Canadian Butter Tart Time Lapse.

Enjoy her video. Then enjoy visiting her gallery here: brookecormier.com.

(BTW – you can purchase a print of Brooke’s sweet masterpiece. Wouldn’t this look perfect on your kitchen wall?)

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

2020 Title Holder for Best Tart is From the Ottawa Valley

This year, the Ottawa Valley can boast having the 2020 Tart Queen (as well as the runner-up queen).  Derek Dunn reports in an Arnprior Chronicle-Guide news article of February 24, 2020.

“Two bakers from just outside Arnprior have won first and second place in the butter tart category at a convention in Toronto.

“Marilyn Misener and her friend Nordella Zimmerling of McNab/Braeside township took home the top ribbon and runner up, respectively, at the Ontario Association of Agricultural Society gala. Misener won the right to submit at the provincial level after winning at the Carp Fair; Zimmerling won at Arnprior’s….

“Judges at the convention blind tasted from the association’s 200 submissions before declaring the winners. They evaluated appearance, including crust and filling, texture, even the folds (preferably none) in the pastry.

Here is the key take away from this story of success.

The two are on the same side on the eternal debate between including or excluding raisins. No raisins!” both said, vehemently.”

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Mom, Tarts, and Life Lessons

Jessica Outram is a very creative school educator. Jessica is a playwright, director, actor, singer, publisher, as well as a poet. She is a member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada. In June 2019, she was appointed the Poet Laureate for Cobourg Ontario.

Jessica writes a delightful blog called Sunshine in a Jar and a few years ago wrote a wonderful piece: Meet Mom and Her Homemade Butter Tarts. Here is an exceptional extract from Jessica’s post about her Mother.

Five Things I’ve Learned from Mom and Her Tarts

  1. Heart: Mom makes tarts to show her love. (She doesn’t even eat the tarts!) The butter tarts are a sign of her generosity, talent, and kindness. She enjoys making the people around her happy. Mom teaches me the importance of putting heart at the centre, of giving our best to others, of creating something excellent to spread joy and express gratitude.
  2. Attention to Detail: Mom attends to perfecting each step in the tart making process. She inspects everything along the way, reflecting on how to make it better. By attending to every small detail, her tarts are absolute perfection each and every time she bakes them. Mom teaches me the importance of being methodical, following a plan, adjusting the plan when needed, and learning from the plan as time passes.
  3. Community: Mom uses tarts to bring people together. From family and friends to community groups to passersby, mom creates a sense of belonging by giving away butter tarts. Mom teaches me how to connect with others through generosity and to give the most to the people who are closest and part of our every day. It’s important to use our skills and talents in the service of building community and belonging.
  4. Practice: Mom worked hard to become an amazing cook and baker. She asked for help when she needed it. She utilized the lessons from her teachers. Mom teaches me that if we practice something, we will improve. If we practice it long enough, we can become experts. She chose to perfect her butter tart making not because it was her favourite thing to bake, but because of the joy the tarts brought others. Every year Mom and Dad continue to adjust the butter tart baking process to improve efficiency and excellence.
  5. Embrace the Crown: Mom has earned her crown as Queen of Tarts and she wears it with pride. It’s important to celebrate our achievements and to accept the compliments of others. Mom teaches me to take pride in my creations, to make space for others to celebrate, and to happily wear a crown when it’s been earned.

(BTW – For the record, Mom Outram uses raisins!) 

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

A Dozen Delectable Photos

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.”

Today we present a dozen of the most delicious photos of mouthwatering butter tarts. If this post does not make you run out and buy a tart today, nothing will.

 

Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Canadian Living’s Butter Tart Recipe

“THE BEST BUTTER TARTS”

INGREDIENTS

Shell:

1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup cold butter cubed

1/4 cup lard cubed

1/4 cup butter cubed

1 egg yolk

1 teaspoon vinegar

ice water

 

Filling:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup corn syrup

1 egg

2 tablespoons butter softened

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 teaspoon vinegar

1 pinch salt

1/4 cup currants

1/4 cup raisin

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1/4 cup shredded coconut

 

DIRECTIONS

In large bowl, whisk flour with salt. With pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in butter and lard until mixture resembles coarse crumbs with a few larger pieces.

In liquid measure, whisk egg yolk with vinegar; add enough ice water to make 1/3 cup (75 mL). Sprinkle over flour mixture, stirring briskly with fork until pastry holds together. Press into disc; wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour. Make-ahead: Refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Filling: In bowl, whisk together brown sugar, corn syrup, egg, butter, vanilla, vinegar and salt until blended; set aside.

On lightly floured surface, roll out pastry to 1/8-inch (3 mm) thickness. Using 4-inch (10 cm) round cookie cutter (or empty 28 oz/796 mL can), cut out 12 circles, rerolling scraps once if necessary. Fit into 2-3/4- x 1-1/4-inch (7 x 3 cm) muffin cups. Divide currants among shells. Spoon in filling until three-quarters full.

Bake in bottom third of 450 F (230 C) oven until filling is puffed and bubbly and pastry is golden, about 12 minutes. Let stand on rack for 1 minute. Run metal spatula around tarts to loosen; carefully slide spatula under tarts and transfer to rack to let cool.

12 servings

SOURCE:  https://www.canadianliving.com/food/baking-and-desserts/recipe/best-butter-tarts

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The humble origins of the butter tart

Butter tarts were common in pioneer Canadian cooking and the recipe is of genuinely Canadian origin.

The earliest published recipe for a “butter filling” is from Barrie, Ontario, dating back to 1900. This recipe is found in The Women’s Auxiliary of the Royal Victoria Hospital Cookbook, submitted by Mrs. Mary Ethel MacLeod, a Scottish immigrant to Ontario.

Throughout the early 1900s butter tarts gained popularity and variations were published in Toronto’s Daily News  The first printed recipe of “The Butter Tart” is found in a 1915 Red Roses Cookbook.

Similar tarts are made in Scotland, where they are often referred to as Ecclefechan butter tarts from the town of Ecclefechan. Elizabeth Baird, former food editor at Canadian Living, states that butter tarts were also known in early Ontario as “border tarts” as many of  the Scottish immigrants came from “the border area” of Scotland and England. Like many other Scots living in rural Canada in the late 1800s. Mrs. MacLeod likely adapted a recipe for the old “border tarts” with local ingredients to make her own unique recipe for the tart filling.

In an October 2019 CBC interview, Liz Driver, author of Culinary Landmarks: A Bibliography of Canadian Cookbooks, states she believes it is wholly feasible that butter tarts were invented by ordinary people in rural Ontario. “It’s absolutely completely believable that something did sort of rise up out of the grassroots.”

On the topic of the origins of the butter tart, there is often reference made to the King’s Daughters (or Filles du Roi) of New France. During a ten-year period, from 1663 to 1673, at least 770 young women were sent to Quebec by Louis XIV to help with colonization. The women were resourceful bakers and they created the forerunner of the butter tart, a sugar pie with baking ingredients like maple sugar and dried fruit.

SOURCES: CBC Radio “History of the Butter Tart”, The Food Bloggers of Canada, The Canadian Encyclopedia, Wikipedia

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

First printed recipe of butter tarts

A Five Roses Flour cookbook has the earliest printed reference to “butter tarts” in Canadian food literature.

The Lake of the Woods Milling Company released the first edition of the Five Roses Cookbook in 1913 as a collection of around 600 recipes submitted by women across Canada via a contest the company held.

A later 1915 edition of this same book has an introduction that states it is an all-Canadian publication: “The recipes were supplied by Canadian housewives. The book was printed in a Canadian shop, and the paper, both inside and cover stock, was produced in a Canadian mill.… Already, nearly 950,000 copies are in daily use in Canadian kitchens — practically one copy for every second Canadian home.”

Here is the Five Roses Cookbook recipe.

 

Butter Tarts 

Ingredients:

Pastry:

2½ cup Five Roses® all-purpose flour

1 tsp salt

1 cup butter, cold

½ cup water, cold

 

Filling:

2 eggs

1 cup brown sugar

½ tsp salt

1 Tbsp cider vinegar

½ cup maple syrup

1/3 cup butter, melted

¾ cup walnuts, chopped

½ cup currants

½ cup raisins

 

Preparation:

Pastry:

Combine the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Add the butter and rub into the flour until mixture resembles coarse meal. Drizzle in enough water until the dough begins to hold together.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and shape into a disc (do not overwork the dough).

Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Roll out dough to 1/8-inch thickness. Cut out three-inch rounds and line 12 muffin cups with dough. Chill.

Filling:

Whisk together eggs and brown sugar. Add the salt, vinegar, maple syrup and melted butter; combine well.

In small bowl mix together walnuts, currants and raisins.

Divide the walnut-fruit mixture between the tart shells.

Fill each tart with approximately ¼-cup filling.

Bake in a preheated 350 F (180 C) oven for 20-25 minutes or until set.

 

SOURCE:  CBC article on recipes in vintage cookbooks

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

The All-Important Question: Raisins or No-Raisins?

The butter tart is recognized as the greatest Canadian food – ranked number one in the latest By George Top-10 List of Canadian Foods, So, By George wants to celebrate this distinction and, therefore, we have declared the month of July “Butter Tart Month.”

Let’s kick off this celebration with the pivotal question for all tart lovers:

“Does the ultimate butter tart contain raisins?”

To register your opinion, email us at chrisg.george@gmail.com or visit the By George Facebook page and click onto our cover image to make your comment.

By George has declared July as “Butter Tart Month.” Here is a menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

Butter Tarts are the Quintessential Canadian food

Today By George published its Canada Day newsletter “Our Canadian Top-10 Lists” which included a list of the greatest Canadian foods.

Ranking number one on that list of Canadian foods was the iconic butter tart.

To view the full list of the top ten Canadian foods, click here.

So, to appropriately pay respect to this honour, By George has declared the month of July as “Butter Tart Month.” Each day the By George Journal will post an article on the infamous Canadian butter tart.

Full a full menu of our delectable articles on Canada’s iconic dessert, click here.

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

By George 10 most favourite quotes on Canada

  1. Canada was built on dead beavers. — Margaret Atwood
  2. The beaver, which has come to represent Canada as the eagle does the United States and the lion Britain, is a flat-tailed, slow-witted, toothy rodent known to bite off it’s own testicles or to stand under its own falling trees. — June Callwood
  3. The huge advantage of Canada is its backwardness. – Marshall McLuhan
  4. Canada has never been a melting-pot; more like a tossed salad. — Arnold Edinborough
  5. Canada is like an old cow. The West feeds it. Ontario and Quebec milk it. And you can well imagine what it’s doing in the Maritimes. — Tommy Douglas
  6. Canadians are generally indistinguishable from Americans, and the surest way of telling the two apart is to make the observation to a Canadian. — Richard Staines
  7. A Canadian is someone who knows how to make love in a canoe. — Pierre Burton
  8. Canada is the linchpin of the English-speaking world. — Sir Winston Churchill
  9. In a world darkened by ethnic conflicts that tear nations apart, Canada stands as a model of how people of different cultures can live and work together in peace, prosperity, and mutual respect. — U.S. President Bill Clinton
  10. When I’m in Canada, I feel this is what the world should be like. — Jane Fonda

.

(ed. – Here are more quotes on our country and its peoples)

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Quotes on our country Canada

1296310790_fb4505fa48

By George Journal presents some of our favourite quotes on Canada and Canucks – so you might spice up your toasts on Canada Day! Cheers!

 

  • A Canadian is someone who knows how to make love in a canoe. — Pierre Burton
  • We Canadians live in a blind spot about our identity. We have very strong feelings about who we aren’t but only weak ones about who we are. We’re passionate about what we don’t want to become but oddly passive about what we should be. — John Cruickshank (in McLean’s Magazine)
  • There are no limits to the majestic future which lies before the mighty expanse of Canada with its verile, aspiring, cultured, and generous-hearted people. — Sir Winston Churchill
  • In a world darkened by ethnic conflicts that tear nations apart, Canada stands as a model of how people of different cultures can live and work together in peace, prosperity, and mutual respect. — U.S. President Bill Clinton
  • Americans are benevolently ignorant about Canada, while Canadians are malevolently well informed about the United States. — J. Bartlett Brebner
  • Canada is the essence of not being. Not English, not American, it is the mathematic of not being. And a subtle flavour – we’re more like celery as a flavour. — Mike Myers
  • Canada is a country whose main exports are hockey players and cold fronts. Our main imports are baseball players and acid rain. — Pierre Trudeau
  • The huge advantage of Canada is its backwardness. – Marshall McLuhan
  • Very little is known of the Canadian country since it is rarely visited by anyone but the Queen and illiterate sport fishermen. — P. J. O’Rourke
  • Canada is like an old cow. The West feeds it. Ontario and Quebec milk it. And you can well imagine what it’s doing in the Maritimes. — Tommy Douglas
  • The beaver, which has come to represent Canada as the eagle does the United States and the lion Britain, is a flat-tailed, slow-witted, toothy rodent known to bite off it’s own testicles or to stand under its own falling trees. — June Callwood
  • If you don’t believe your country should come before yourself, you can better serve your country by livin’ someplace else. — Stompin’ Tom Connors
  • We shall be Canadians first, foremost, and always, and our policies will be decided in Canada and not dictated by any other country. — John G. Diefenbaker
  • In any world menu, Canada must be considered the vichyssoise of nations, it’s cold, half-French, and difficult to stir. — Stuart Keate
  • Canada has never been a melting-pot; more like a tossed salad. — Arnold Edinborough
  • Canada: A few acres of snow. — Voltaire
  • Canadians, like their historians, have spent too much time remembering conflicts, crises, and failures. They forgot the great, quiet continuity of life in a vast and generous land. A cautious people learns from its past; a sensible people can face its future. Canadians, on the whole, are both. — Desmond Morton
  • Canadians were the first anti-Americans, and the best. Canadian anti-Americanism, just as the country’s French-English duality, has for two centuries been the central buttress of our national identity. — Jack Granetstein
  • Canadians are generally indistinguishable from Americans, and the surest way of telling the two apart is to make the observation to a Canadian. — Richard Staines
  • Here in Canada, in the Western world, we are inside the walls. Outside the walls are the barbarians. — Barbara Amiel
    I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind. — John Diefenbaker (From the Canadian Bill of Rights, July 1, 1960)
  • When I’m in Canada, I feel this is what the world should be like. — Jane Fonda
  • Canada is the linchpin of the English-speaking world. — Sir Winston Churchill
  • There is a Canadian culture that is in some ways unique to Canada, but I don’t think Canadian culture coincides neatly with borders. — Stephen Harper
  • Canada was built on dead beavers. — Margaret Atwood

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

You might be Canadian if…

You might be Canadian if:

  • You have 10 favorite recipes for moose meat.
  • You know how to pronounce and spell “Saskatchewan”
  • Your municipality buys a Zamboni before a bus.
  • You know that Canadian Tire on any Saturday is busier than the toy stores before Christmas.
  • You bring a portable TV on a camping trip so that you don’t miss Hockey Night.
  • You substitute beer for water when cooking.
  • You pity people who haven’t tasted a “beavertail”.
  • You have worn shorts and a parka at the same time
  • You design your Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit.
  • You have twins named Wayne and Gretzky (alternately Gordie and Howe).
  • You owe more money on your snowmobile than on your car.
  • You know which leaves make for good toilet paper.
  • You think sexy lingerie is tube-socks and a flannel nightie with only 8 buttons.
  • The local paper covers national and international headlines on 2 pages, but requires 6 pages for hockey.

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.


Short jokes re: Canada

Q: What do you call a sophisticated American?/ A: Canadian.

Q: What are the two seasons of weather in Canada? / A: Six months of winter and six months of poor snowmobiling.

Q: What does a Canadian say when you step on his foot? / A: “Sorry”

Q: How do you empty a swimming pool of Canadians? / A: “Excuse me, could everyone please get out of the pool?”

Q: What’s the difference between an American and a Canadian?/ A: An Canadian not only has a sense of humour but can also spell it.

Q: Did you hear about the war between Newfoundland and Nova Scotia?/ A: The Newfies were lobbing hand grenades; the Nova Scotians were pulling the pins and throwing them back.

Q: Did you hear about the Newfoundlander who died drinking milk?/ A: The cow fell on him.

Q: Why did the Canadian cross the road? / A: He saw some American do it on TV.

Q: How do you know when a Canadian is going on a date? / A: The entire dog team has had a bath.

Q: How many Canadians does it take to change a light bulb? / A: Twelve. Four to form a Parliamentary study committee to decide how to solve the problem, one Francophone to complain that I didn’t translate this joke into French, one Native Canadian to protest that the interests of Native Canadians have been overlooked, one woman from the National Action Committee On the Status Of Women to say that women have been underrepresented in the process, one to go over the border to the Niagara Falls Factory Outlet Mall and buy a new bulb and not pay duty on it on the way back, one to actually screw it in, one to collect taxes on the whole procedure so the government can afford it, one to buy a case of Molson for everybody to drink, and one to drop the puck.

 

 

BONUS JOKE:  A Canadian is walking down the street with a case of beer under his arm.  His friend Doug stops him and asks, “Hey Bob! Whacha get the case of beer for?”
“I got it for my wife, eh.” answers Bob.
“Oh!” exclaims Doug, “Good trade.”

 

 

BONUS JOKE #2:  An American, a Scot and a Canadian were in a terrible car accident. They were all brought to the same emergency room, but all three of them died before they arrived. Just as they were about to put the toe tag on the American, he stirred and opened his eyes. Astonished, the doctors and nurses present asked him what happened.

“Well,” said the American, “I remember the crash, and then there was a beautiful light, and then the Canadian and the Scot and I were standing at the gates of heaven. St.Peter approached us and said that we were all too young to die, and said that for a donation of $50, we could return to earth. So of course I pulled out my wallet and gave him the $50, and the next thing I knew I was back here.”

“That’s amazing!” said the one of the doctors, “But what happened to the other two?”

“Last I saw them,” replied the American, “the Scot was haggling over the price and the Canadian was waiting for the government to pay his.”

 

 

BONUS JOKE #3:  In a train car there were a Canadian, an American, a spectacular looking blonde and a fat lady. During the trip the train passes through a dark tunnel, and the unmistakable sound of a slap is heard. When the train exits the tunnel, the American had a big red slap mark on his cheek.

The blonde thought – “That American idiot wanted to touch me and by mistake he must have put his hand on the fat lady, who in turn must have slapped his face.”

The fat lady thought – “This dirty old American laid his hands on the blonde and she smacked him.”

The American thought – “That crazy Canadian put his hand on that blonde and by mistake she slapped me.”

The Canadian thought – “I hope there’s another tunnel soon so I can smack that stupid American again.”

Go ahead and laugh your way through the holiday weekend… Happy Canada Day!

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Our Canada Day Quiz

This quiz is different in that there will not be any wrong answers… your goal is to get the most Canadian of answers to the question “What best defines Canada?”

We have taken the responses from a national poll of Canadians conducted by the Dominion Institute within the past few years. We have then weighted those findings with two other Top-Ten Canadiana Lists (of askmen.ca and By George Journal). Our final list of symbols/icons is graded and a point system will be used to score your top ten mentions.  (So, you will want to mention as many of the most popular Canadian symbols as other Canadians have in the survey and found on the top ten lists.)

The Canada Day quiz question is, “Name 10 symbols of Canada that best define this country?”

Your list of ten Canadiana can include symbols, icons, people, places, events, accomplishments and/or inventions. What best defines our country and being Canadian…

TOP TEN CANADIANA THAT DEFINE THIS COUNTRY

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Once you (and your family and friends) have completed the list(s) of ten Canadiana, mark the answers with our point system and compare how you have done in capturing the best symbols that define our country. (The top possible score is 56.)

The point system is found in comments below. (When printing this off for your Canada Day party, be sure not to include the answers below).

 

Happy Efisga Day, er, Canada Day

Have you wondered where the name ‘Canada’ comes from?

It’s the Huron-Iroquois word ‘kanata’ which means ‘settlement’ or ‘village.’

Jacques Cartier first heard it in reference to Quebec City, but soon it was used to describe the whole region. Upper Canada Parliamentarian Thomas D’Arcy McGee argued the adoption of Canada as the name for the country in 1865. And the name was officially adopted on July 1, 1867.

So, have you ever wondered what other names were being considered for this country?

Here are some of the names that were bested by the moniker ‘Canada.’

Acadia – Albertland – Albionara

Albona – Alexandrina – Aquilonia

Borealia – British North America – Brittanica

Cabotia – Canadensia – Colonia

Efisga – Hochelaga – Laurentia

Mesopelagia – New Albion – Niagarentia

Norland – Superior – Transatlantia

Transatlantica – Transylvania – Tuponia

Ursulia – Vesperia – Victorialand or Victorialia

Say, how does “Happy Efisga Day” sound?

Or “Happy Hochelaga Day!”

Of course, I like many of my friends still like to say “Happy Dominion Day,” but that’s an argument for another time….

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

The Maple Leaf Forever!

Here are the words of the chorus and first couple of verses of the song that first united our land – the song that our soldiers marched to in WWI – establishing forever the maple leaf as an enduring symbol of all that is Canadian.

Chorus:

The Maple Leaf, our emblem dear,
The Maple Leaf forever!
God save our Queen and Heaven bless
The Maple Leaf forever!

In days of yore, from Britain’s shore,

Wolfe, the dauntless hero, came
And planted firm Britannia’s flag
On Canada’s fair domain.
Here may it wave, our boast our pride
And, joined in love together,
The thistle, shamrock, rose entwine
The Maple Leaf forever!

Chorus

At Queenston Heights and Lundy’s Lane,
Our brave fathers, side by side,
For freedom, homes and loved ones dear,
Firmly stood and nobly died;
And those dear rights which they maintained,
We swear to yield them never!
Our watchword evermore shall be
“The Maple Leaf forever!”

Chorus

 

Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

10 Fascinating Facts about Beavers

1. Giant beavers roamed Eurasia and North America in the Pleistocene era, rubbing shoulders with mastodons and mammoths. They were 10 feet in length, including tail just smaller than a MINI Cooper and weighed up to 800 pounds.

2. The modern beaver is the second-largest rodent in the world (the capybara of South America is the first). An average adult beaver weighs 35 to 70 pounds and measures 4 feet long, including a 12-inch tail.

3. A large adult beaver skin yielded enough fur for 18 beaver hats. The beaver was hunted and trapped almost to the point of extinction. They are firmly established once more, thanks to a conversation movement championed by Grey Owl, the infamous English immigrant who posed as a Metis in the 1930s.

4. Grey Owl claimed to have compiled a beaver dictionary by listening to the utterings of his two pet beavers, Rawhide and Jellyroll. He stated that he could recognize 49 words and expressions that were intelligible to all beavers, but the manuscript of this dictionary is now missing and presumed lost forever.

5. Beavers are well adapted to working underwater. A secondary transparent eyelid allows them to see, and specialized ducts allow them to close off their ears, nostrils and lips so they can chew without drowning.

6. The two chisel-like upper front teeth of the beaver grow continuously and are sharpened by the act of gnawing on trees. They are not buck teeth, but rather point inwards to facilitate chewing wood.

7. Beavers groom themselves constantly to keep their pelt waterproof with the oil (castoreum) they produce in two glands near their anus. Castoreum also keeps their soft, fine under-fur from matting. Moisture never penetrates their skin, even after a long time swimming underwater.

8. The urge to build dams stems from an instinctive aversion to the sound of running water. Beavers will try desperately to stem the flow, thereby flooding their surroundings to create a pond deep enough that the water wont freeze in winter. They eat sticks in these lean months, so they spend the entire fall submerging twigs in the pond and poking them into the muddy bottom to store them.

9. Contrary to popular legend, beavers do not know how to fell trees so that they fall in a certain direction. Beaver remains have been found that show that the trees they were chewing fell towards them, pinching and crushing their skulls. With their work, it is the female beavers that do most of the engineering and lodge planning, while the male beavers inspect the structure and patch the leaks.

10. Beavers are monogamous and mate for life. And a word to dispel the myth about male beavers biting off their own testicles if provoked. This dates back to Aesops fables when the beaver was hunted for its castoreum, which people believed was produced in the testicles. A story popular at the time held that beavers would see a hunter coming and would bite off their testicles and toss them to the hunter to avoid being killed. If they were chased again, they would flash the hunter to show that they already made the ultimate sacrifice.

 .
Chris George, providing reliable PR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer or experienced communicator? 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.