Tag Archives: christmas

With Eggnog, you know the holiday season is upon us!!

eggnog2

It’s an eggnog bowl! Let the festivities begin!

Here’s a recipe for traditional – real eggs and cream – eggnog.

Enjoy! Cheers!

 

Ingredients

12 eggs, separated
6 cups milk
2 cups heavy/ thickened cream
2 cups bourbon
1+ 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 cup brandy
2 teaspoons ground nutmeg

Directions

  • In a large bowl and using a mixer, beat the egg yolks together with the sugar for approx 10 minutes (you want the mixture to be firm and the colour of butter).
  • Very slowly, add in the bourbon and brandy – just a little at a time.
  • When bourbon and brandy have been added, allow the mixture to cool in the fridge (for up to 6 hours, depending on how long before your party you’re making the eggnog).
  • 30 minutes before your guests arrive, stir the milk into the chilled yolk mixture.
  • Stir in 1+ 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg.
  • In a separate bowl, beat the cream with a mixer on high speed until the cream forms stiff peaks.
  • In yet another bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  • Gently fold the egg white mixture into the egg yolk mixture.
  • Gently fold the cream into the egg mixture.
  • After ladling into cups, garnish with the remainder of the ground nutmeg.
  • Serves: 8

.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @ CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

10 interesting Christmas facts

1. Christmas was once a moveable feast celebrated at many different times during the year. The choice of December 25 was made by Pope Julius I, in the 4th century A.D., because this coincided with the pagan rituals of Winter Solstice, or Return of the Sun. The intent was to replace the pagan celebration with the Christian one.

2. Christmas Day in the Ukraine can be celebrated on either December 25, in faithful alliance with the Roman Catholic Gregorian calendar, or on January 7, which is the Orthodox or Eastern Rite (Julian calendar), the church holy day.

3. During the ancient 12-day Christmas celebration, the log burned was called the “Yule log.” Sometimes a piece of the Yule log would be kept to kindle the fire the following winter, to ensure that the good luck carried on from year to year. The Yule log custom was handed down from the Druids.

4. At lavish Christmas feasts in the Middle Ages, swans and peacocks were sometimes served “endored.” This meant the flesh was painted with saffron dissolved in melted butter. In addition to their painted flesh, endored birds were served wrapped in their own skin and feathers, which had been removed and set aside prior to roasting.

5. After A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens wrote several other Christmas stories, one each year, but none was as successful as the original. Before settling on the name of Tiny Tim for his character, three other alliterative names were considered by Charles Dickens. They were Little Larry, Puny Pete, and Small Sam. And Dickens’ initial choice for Scrooge’s statement “Bah Humbug” was “Bah Christmas.”

6. During the Christmas/Hanukkah season, more than 1.76 billion candy canes will be made. Candy canes began as straight white sticks of sugar candy used to decorated the Christmas trees. A choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral decided have the ends bent to depict a shepherd’s crook and he would pass them out to the children to keep them quiet during the services. It wasn’t until about the 20th century that candy canes acquired their red stripes.

7. Christmas caroling began as an old English custom called Wassailing. “Wassail” comes from the Old Norse “ves heill” – to be of good health. This evolved into the tradition of visiting neighbors on Christmas Eve and drinking to their health.

8. Mistletoe, a traditional Christmas symbol, was once revered by the early Britons. It was so sacred that it had to be cut with a golden sickle.

9. Hallmark introduced its first Christmas cards in 1915, five years after the founding of the company. More than three billion Christmas cards are sent annually in the United States.

10. Greeks do not use Christmas trees or give presents at Christmas. In Greek legend, malicious creatures called Kallikantzari (gremlin-like spirits) sometimes play troublesome pranks at Christmas time. According to the legend, to get rid of them, you should burn either salt or an old shoe. Apparently the stench of the burning shoe (or salt) drives off the creatures. Other effective methods include hanging a pig’s jawbone by the door and keeping a large fire so they can’t sneak down the chimney. A priest may throw a little cross into the village water to keep kallikantzari hiding in dark, dusty corners, he goes from house to house sprinkling holy water.

[ed. – Source: Christmas Facts at corsinet.com]

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Our elves will be serving Christmas cheer daily!

Be sure to follow our By George Journal for countless posts celebrating the Christmas season. Our wordsmith elves will be busy providing remarkable quotes, the best of Christmas humour, seasonal facts and articles – all guaranteed to put you in the holiday spirit. Follow the By George Facebook page and our Twitter @byGeorgeJournal to drink in a steady stream of creative yule time content.

 

It is a very social time of year. So, let us provide you with merry sayings and helpful information. Our content will ensure you suffer no awkward silences with your family and friends, or at office parties. We encourage you to use our bons mots and share the posts widely – spread the joy!

 

Join the merriment on Facebook

Join us on Twitter

 

We hope to have a little fun through December. We ask that you take up a glass and join the party. Enjoy the By George Virtual Eggnog Bowl!

 

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas and the very best

of the season to you and yours!!

.

Time was with most of us, when Christmas Day,

encircling all our limited world like a magic ring,

left nothing out for us to miss or seek;

bound together all our home enjoyments,

affections, and hopes; grouped everything and everyone

round the Christmas fire, and make the little picture

shining in our bright young eyes, complete.

– Charles Dickens

.

 

Kourambiedes-Greek Christmas Cookies

christmas_14

Here is a wonderful recipe of a cookie that is a favourite in every Greek household at this time of the year (well, at any time of the year!).

Mixing the ingredients

Beat on medium speed until lightened in color and creamy:
3/4 pound unsalted butter, softened
1/4 teaspoon salt

Beat until very fluffy and well blended:
2/3 cup powdered sugar
1 large egg yolk
2 tablespoons brandy
1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract

Gradually add and stir until well blended and smooth:
3 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
1 cup Ground Almonds* see note below (optional)

Instructions

1. Cover and refrigerate the dough until firm enough to shape into balls, about 1 hour.

2. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Grease cookie sheets.

3. Pull off pieces of the dough and roll between your palms into generous 1-inch balls. Space about 1 inch apart on the sheets.

4. Bake, 1 sheet at a time, until the cookies are faintly tinged with brown, 14-18 minutes; routate the sheet halfway through baking for even browning. Remove the sheet to a rack and let stand until the cookies firm slightly. Gently transfer to racks to cool completely.

5. Sift over the cookies until evenly coated: 1/3 cup powdered sugar

6. If desired, 1 cup ground almonds may be added to this recipe. If you do add the ground almonds, stir in after you have added the vanilla or almond extract, then continue with recipe.

This recipe makes about 4 dozen (1 1/4 inch) cookies.

 

10 Great Christmas Toasts

champagne-glass-mdHere are ten of our favourite Christmas toasts. We trust your gatherings with Family and friends are wonderful through this holiday… Cheers!  

  • May Peace be your gift at Christmas and your blessing all year through!
  • May peace, love and prosperity follow you always.
  • May the Blessings of Christmas be with you today and always.
  • May the closeness of friends, the comfort of home, and the unity of our nation, renew your spirits this holiday season
  • May the Good Lord fulfill you with His promises and bestow on you His many blessings
  • May the Holiday Season bring only happiness and joy to you and your loved ones.
  • May the Joy and Peace of Christmas be with you now and throughout the new year.
  • May the peace and joy of the holiday season be with you throughout the coming year.
  • May you have the gift of faith, the blessing of hope and the peace of His love at Christmas and always
  • Merry Christmas May God bless you richly throughout this holiday season.

.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

3 Tips on being a Good Conversationalist

This is the season of Christmas socials, year-end parties, and gatherings of colleagues, friends and family. Like no other time of year, we enjoy cocktails, plenty of delicious foods, and endless conversations.

So, By George Journal asks, ‘What makes a good conversationalist?’  Here are three pointers to be that ‘gracious host’ or that ‘guest you must remember to invite again next year.’

#1.  A good conversationalist is a great listener. When people engage in conversation, most feel that what they have to say is important. Nothing signals more to a person that you are interested in them than to give undivided attention to what they are saying. Listen intently, ask questions and provide comments; don’t mindlessly nod and continually glance over the person’s shoulder to see what is happening across the room.

#2.  What you say will not likely be remembered,  but how you make people feel will not be forgottened. It’s most important to smile when you greet and depart an individual or group. Make and keep eye contact with those you are speaking with. Use appropriate body language and facial gestures to demonstrate your engagement and enjoyment in the conversation(s).

#3.  Be ever-ready to share a great story or series of anecdotes. Enliven conversations with personal observations, remarkable sayings, and a provocative question or two.  Through the next few days, By George Journal will provided a series of conversation-starters. Here are our five favourite from the “Over the Eggnog Bowl” posts for your holiday exchanges.

  1. Is Santa coming to your family this Christmas? You do believe in Santa, right!?
  2. If you could offer a newborn child only one piece of advice, what would it be?
  3. How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?
  4. Joy is found with simple awareness.  What does your joy look like today?
  5. It used to be that at a party one should never discuss religion, sex and politics. Does this still stand? Are there other subjects that need to be added to this list of avoidable conversations?

.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

#FakeChristmasSongFacts

#FakeChristmasSongFacts from Twitter! Very funny…

littledrummerboy-bookii

The full version of Little Drummer Boy has a twenty minute drum solo.

Silent Night is best performed by mimes.

Do You Hear What I Hear was inspired by an ear exam.

Only 2 Of The Hens Were French. The Other 1 Was Portuguese.

There Is A 3rd Verse Where Frosty Goes Berserk And Kills All The Townspeople.

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” was originally written during a Los Angeles traffic jam in July.

Silent Night was written by a man who snored like a freight train.

Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer eerily predicted the 2016 Presidential election results.

Grandma didn’t get run over by a reindeer; she was assaulted for being a Trump supporter.

Original version of “Rocking around the Christmas Tree” had way more cowbell.

Those 5 golden rings were gold-plated because that jackass spent all his money on birds.

I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus eventually led to a brutal child custody battle.

Whoever wrote Silent Night never had any kids.

After Santa asked Rudolph to be his guide, he then turned to the other reindeer and said ”Deal With It.”

The person who wrote “Noel” was dyslexic and it was supposed to be about his brother Leon.

The only thing God and Satan can agree upon? Christmas songs shall play 24/7 for eternity in *all* Circles of Hell!

.

Join By George Journal on Twitter – @ByGeorgeJournal

.

Chris George provides reliable PR & GR counsel and effective advocacy. Need a go-to writer and experienced communicator? Call 613-983-0801 @CG&A COMMUNICATIONS.

 

 

Christmas is not a date. It is a state of mind.

   

But I am sure that I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round…as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely.” 

– Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol 

 

Merry Christmas!

A Traditional Eggnog Recipe

It’s eggnog season!

Here’s a recipe for traditional – real eggs and cream – eggnog. It’s from the authority website of eggnog – called (what else but) http://www.eggnogrecipe.net/

Enjoy! Cheers!

.

Ingredients
12 eggs, separated
6 cups milk
2 cups heavy/ thickened cream
2 cups bourbon
1+ 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 cup brandy
2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
Directions

  • In a large bowl and using a mixer, beat the egg yolks together with the sugar for approx 10 minutes (you want the mixture to be firm and the colour of butter).
  • Very slowly, add in the bourbon and brandy – just a little at a time.
  • When bourbon and brandy have been added, allow the mixture to cool in the fridge (for up to 6 hours, depending on how long before your party you’re making the eggnog).
  • 30 minutes before your guests arrive, stir the milk into the chilled yolk mixture.
  • Stir in 1+ 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg.
  • In a separate bowl, beat the cream with a mixer on high speed until the cream forms stiff peaks.
  • In yet another bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  • Gently fold the egg white mixture into the egg yolk mixture.
  • Gently fold the cream into the egg mixture.
  • After ladling into cups, garnish with the remainder of the ground nutmeg.
  • Serves: 8

Here’s one of our favourite websites to get that special, traditional Christmas recipe.

 

 

Ringing in the Season with By George

eggnog2The By George newsletter was delivered today: Frothy content for use through the Season

In it, we have rung in the Christmas Season by announcing our editorial mission through the next five weeks. The introductory letter to our readers stated:

   Through this merry season of socials, By George will bring you a bevy of frothy content so that you might share the joy and make the greatest of personal statements.

   By George is making the most of the season – pouring generous amounts of Christmas spirit – and it all starts today.

Here is what you can expect from By George

The By George Journal will have everything-you-want-to-know about Christmas with daily posts through December

The By George Facebook will have seasonal memes, quotes and links to share with your FB followers

And on twitter, @ByGeorgeJournal will be providing a stream of merry tweets – RT #ByGeorgeHoHo

We hope our readers will share the joy and make the most of this wonderous season. Let us be the first to say, “Merry Christmas.”

Eggnog!

It’s eggnog season – everyone into the bowl!

 

Our elves love this traditional Christmas drink. Tis the season and eggnog is the seasonal refreshment. Over the years, By George Journal has shared a few interesting egg-noggy posts. So, to whet your whistle for your holiday socials, take out a punch glass and dip into these past posts!

 

The real-eggs-and-real-cream eggnog recipe

 

Eggnog’s rather rich history  (Did you know that in Colonial America, rum was commonly called “grog”, so the name eggnog is likely derived from the very descriptive term for this drink, “egg-and-grog”, which corrupted to egg’n’grog and soon to eggnog?)

 

Three pointers to being the season’s great conversationalist – including our five favourite questions to ask over the eggnog bowl.

 

Cheers!!

 

Our 2014 Christmas Wish

Christmas-Window-Candles-10

 

At By George, we have an annual tradition to send out a Christmas greeting with links to Yuletide facts, quotes and interesting lists that celebrate the season. So, please follow this link and accept our e-newsletter as our friendship gesture in wishing you the very best these holidays.

 

Our 2014 Christmas Wish

 

We hope and wish you a wonderful holiday with your family and friends. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

(ed. – If you didn’t receive the Christmas Wish it is because you are not on our mailing list. Connect with us and we can ensure you get our next missive. Click on “Join our mailing list” box in the lower right hand corner of the e-newsletter.)

 

A Christmas Story: The Gifts

christmas presents

A family had twin boys whose only resemblance to each other was their looks. If one felt it was too hot, the other thought it was too cold. If one said the TV was too loud, the other claimed the volume needed to be turned up. Opposite in every way, one was an eternal optimist, the other a doom and gloom pessimist.

Just to see what would happen, on Christmas Eve the twins’ father loaded the pessimist’s room with every imaginable toy and game. The optimist’s room he loaded with horse manure.

Christmas morning the father passed by the pessimist’s room and found him sitting amid his new gifts crying bitterly.

“Why are you crying?” the father asked.

“Because my friends will be jealous, I’ll have to read all these instructions before I can do anything with this stuff, I’ll constantly need batteries, and my toys will eventually get broken.” answered the pessimist twin.

Passing the optimist twin’s room, the father found him dancing for joy in the pile of manure. “What are you so happy about?” he asked.

To which his optimist twin replied, “There’s got to be a pony in here somewhere!”

 

(ed. – This is a favourite story of ours, posted a few times in earlier Decembers in the By George Journal.)

FAV Christmas Links

Christmas-Tree-Fireplace-1024-127315

 

In looking through all the articles we’ve posted over the years, the By George elves have picked three they consider “favourite.”

Our Favourite Magical Christmas Sayings

Our Favourite Classic Christmas Movie

Our favourite joke about gift-receiving

 

And then a few rogue elves picked three more, less-liked

but very interesting posts:

Top Ten Christmas Record Breakers

The hustle and bustle of Christmas shopping

Kourambiedes-Greek Christmas Cookies

 

Of course, there’s a lot more to see in the menu of articles

tagged “Christmas”

 

Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas and the very best

of the season to you and yours!!

 

Time was with most of us, when Christmas Day,

encircling all our limited world like a magic ring,

left nothing out for us to miss or seek;

bound together all our home enjoyments,

affections, and hopes; grouped everything and everyone

round the Christmas fire, and make the little picture

shining in our bright young eyes, complete.

– Charles Dickens

 

Our Christmas Wish – By George

Link to quotes, Christmas facts and humour

 

Our Favourite Classic Christmas Movie

There is excitement in the air as tonight we will be watching our favorite Christmas classic. The elves at By George Journal have held dear the movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” as the best Christmas flick of all time! This story is a moving account of a caring, community-minded, family man who struggles with inner-doubt and comes to fully appreciate the love of family and friends with the help of an aspiring angel-in-waiting on Christmas Eve. In our crazy, mixed-up world, it really doesn’t get any better than this.

 

Everyone should place watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” on their “list-of-must-dos” in the annual lead up to Christmas Day.  As you prepare the dried-cranberry-and-popcorn, here are a few quick links to our Journal’s posts on this timeless Christmas treasure:

 

Drop us a note and let us know when you view “It’s a Wonderful Life” this Christmas season. Enjoy!